Systems Engineering Analysis Curriculum and Program

Chair

Jeff Kline, CAPT, USN (Ret.) (SEA Chair)

Naval Postgraduate School

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 262

1411 Cunningham Road

Monterey, CA 93943-5219

(831) 656-7946, DSN 756-7946, FAX (831) 656-2595

jekline@nps.edu

Members

Academic Associate

Mark Stevens

Code SE/ST, Bullard Hall, Room 201I

(831) 656-7545, DSN 756-7545

FAX (831) 656-3129

mstevens@nps.edu

Program Officer

Keith Littrell, LCDR, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 283

(831) 656-2358, DSN 756-2358

FAX (831) 656-2595

wklittre@nps.edu

Chair, Department of Systems Engineering

Cliff Whitcomb, Ph.D.

Code SE/Ol, Bullard Hall, Room 201K

(831) 656-3583, DSN 756-3583

FAX (831) 656-3129

cawhitco@nps.edu

Chair, Department of Operations Research

Robert Dell, Ph.D.

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 239A

(831) 656-2654, DSN 756-2654

FAX (831) 656-2595

Overview

The Systems Engineering Analysis (SEA) curriculum and program at NPS provides a unique education bridging the knowledge bases of both Systems Engineering and Operations Analysis. The Chair of SEA, supported by the Academic Associate and Program Officer, manages execution of the program. The Deans of GSEAS and GSOIS jointly exercise overall executive responsibility, with the chairs of the Systems Engineering and Operations Research Departments being jointly responsible for ensuring the quality of the program. The Chair of SEA acts as a liaison point-of-contact for the collaborative efforts between the curriculum sponsor, OPNAV N9I and the SEA curriculum and program at NPS, and collaborates with the two department chairs in professional development, supports team-oriented research and analysis that links technical solutions to tactical problems, enhances understanding of the Navy's Requirements-Setting, Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution (PPBE) and acquisition processes, and the manner in which they impact warfighting acquisition programs.

The responsibilities of the faculty team are:

  1. To maintain the military relevance and academic excellence of the SEA program;
  2. To foster close relationships with the appropriate officers in OPNAV and the Fleet and with a curriculum sponsor, emphasizing the curriculum goal of improving the technical-tactical-operational prowess of the unrestricted line;
  3. To draw on the best qualified and most knowledgeable faculty to serve as instructors and curriculum/course advisors;
  4. To work through the Academic Associate, to ensure the interdisciplinary nature of the program is maintained, and that the best possible use is made of existing courses and faculty;
  5. To enhance the availability of suitable student capstone projects, the professionalism of faculty advisors, and the quality of written project reports;
  6. To foster the selection and matriculation of well-qualified students who have intellectual and professional promise of being future leaders of the Navy; and,
  7. To advise the Chair in the management of SEA courses, administration of SEA students, and supervising the SEA Capstone project.

Degrees Awarded

The Systems Engineering and Operations Research Departments jointly award the Master of Science in Systems Engineering Analysis (MS SEA) degree. The SEA curriculum is designed for unrestricted line officers who aspire to command and seek a graduate degree tailored to enhance their value as combat officers. The hallmark of the curriculum is a strong scientific and technical content that offers a balanced blend and breadth in systems thinking and analysis of current and future military operations.

Candidates normally are expected to have studied mathematics and science in their undergraduate work. Undergraduate engineering study is advantageous, but not required.

The Master of Science degree in Systems Engineering Analysis requires a minimum of 48 quarter-hours of graduate-level work. The candidate must take all courses in an approved study program, which must also satisfy the following requirements: A minimum of 36 quarter-hours of credit in 3000 and 4000 level courses, including a minimum of 12 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.

Participation in a capstone project with a minimum of 12 credits is required for the degree. An acceptable thesis, for a minimum of 12 credits, may be substituted in lieu of a team project. The Academic Associate and the Program Officer must endorse such a request, which will be subject to final approval by the Chair Professor.

A student seeking the Master of Science in Systems Engineering Analysis must also demonstrate knowledge in systems design and integration, systems analysis and application, combat technology, and familiarity with professional military education in strategy and policy. This may be accomplished by completing all courses in an approved study program.

Systems Engineering Analysis Program – Curriculum 308

Program Officer

Keith Littrell, LCDR, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 283

(831) 656-2358, DSN 756-2358

FAX (831) 656-2595

wklittre@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Mark Stevens

Code SE/ST, Bullard Hall, Room 201I

(831) 656-7545, DSN 756-7545

FAX (831) 656-3129

mstevens@nps.edu

This interdisciplinary curriculum provides a foundation in systems thinking, technology, and operations analysis for warfighters. Graduates will be able to understand how to develop and fight new systems of combat systems, and have a more thorough understanding of current combat systems.

Students normally complete group projects in lieu of theses. These “capstone” projects are chosen to allow students to gain a thorough understanding of a critical warfare area and to provide the Navy and other services insights about future systems options to meet emerging needs.

The program is designed as a highly integrated graduate education. Lectures, team projects, and individual research are provided, as well as seminars from visiting experts. The length of this program is eight quarters.

Requirements for Entry

For entry, the officer must have at least a C+ undergraduate grade point average, with at least one calculus course with a C or better and at least one calculus-based physics course with a C or better (APC 334). If an officer is an outstanding performer, but lacks the necessary academic preparation, waivers may be considered. In addition, distance learning courses in Calculus are available for candidates wishing to obtain higher math skills.

Systems Engineering Analysis Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies a naval officer as a Systems Engineering Subspecialist, with subspecialty code 6500P.

Entry Dates

The Systems Engineering Analysis curriculum is an eight-quarter curriculum with entry dates in January and July. If further information is needed, contact the Program Officer or Academic Associate for this curriculum.

Degrees

Master of Science in Systems Engineering Analysis

This degree is proposed for all students completing the 308 curriculum. The System Engineering and Operations Research departments are the approving authority for the degree.

Master of Science in Systems Engineering

To be considered for this degree, a student must meet the degree requirements (including an ABET EAC accredited engineering BS degree or documented equivalent) and complete all the requirements of curriculum 308. The chair of the Department of Systems Engineering is the approving authority for the degree.

Master of Science in Systems Analysis

Selected students may elect to earn a degree in Systems Analysis from the Department of Operations Research. This involves a thesis in lieu of project and an extended analysis sequence. The chair of the Department of Operations Research is the approving authority for the degree.

Typical Course of Study

The first quarter of the SEA curriculum reflects a review of mathematics and physics, from a systems perspective. Subsequent quarters present a balance of courses in systems engineering, operations analysis, technology, joint professional military education, culminating in the capstone project-encompassed by the SE3201/2/3 sequence of courses. The students gain additional knowledge and insight through seminars and project related travel.

Quarter 1 (Accelerated)

SE1001

(4-2)

Math I for SEA

SE1002

(3-1)

Math II for SEA

SE2003

(4-2)

Introduction to Mechanical Systems

SE2101

(4-2)

Introduction to Electro- Mechanical Systems

Quarter 2

SE3000

(1-0)

Systems Engineering Colloquium

SE3100

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

SE3112

(3-2)

Combat Systems Engineering I (Sensors)

OS3180

(4-1)

Probability and Statistics for Systems Engineers

MN3301

(4-0)

Acquisition of Defense Systems

Quarter 3

SI3400

(3-2)

Engineering Project Management

OS3211

(4-0)

Systems Optimization

SE3000

(1-0)

Systems Engineering Colloquium

OS3680

(4-0)

Naval Tactical Analysis

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy & Policy

Quarter 4

SE3113

(3-2)

Combat Systems Engineering II (Weapons)

SE3302

(3-2)

Systems Suitability

SE3000

(1-0)

Systems Engineering Colloquium

OS4680

(4-0)

Naval Systems Analysis

OS3380

(3-1)

Combat Systems Simulation

Quarter 5

SE3303

(3-2)

Systems Assessment

SE4112

(3-2)

Combat Systems Engineering III

OA4602

(4-0)

Joint Campaign Analysis

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

SE3000

(1-0)

Systems Engineering Colloquium

Quarter 6

NW3275

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Operations I (U.S. Navy URL only)

SE4115

(3-2)

Combat Systems Integration

Elective

 

 

SE3201

(2-4)

Engineering Systems Conceptualization

SE3000

(1-0)

Systems Engineering Colloquium

Quarter 7

Elective

 

 

OA4603

(4-0)

Systems test and Evaluation

SE3202

(2-4)

Engineering Systems Design

NW3276

(2-2)

Joint Maritime Operations II (U.S. Navy URL only)

SE3000

(1-0)

Systems Engineering Colloquium

Quarter 8

Elective

 

 

SE3203

(2-4)

Engineering Systems Implementation & Operation

SI0810 or Elective

(0-8)

Integrating Project

NW3285

(4-0)

National Security Decision Making

Educational Skill Requirements
Systems Engineering Analysis Curriculum

Broad Objective

This curriculum teaches U.S. Navy Unrestricted Line Officers how the Navy builds and operates large combat systems of systems. The primary objective is to prepare officers to serve afloat and in key operational staff billets by giving them the technological and analytical understanding to fight the fleet today and in the future. The emphasis is on integration of complex warfare systems with compatible tactics. In addition, graduates with experience afloat will be prepared to serve ashore as program managers and in technical/analytical billets on headquarters staffs.

  1. Basics. Introduction to the mathematics, physics, and computer skills needed to understand the technical aspects of combat, information, and decision systems.
  2. Systems Engineering. Understand the systems engineering process and how to perform systems engineering studies, to include a knowledge of system design, development, and deployment; technical and cost trade-offs; human-in-the-loop issues and project management. Be able to integrate relevant technological disciplines that bear on weapons, sensor and information systems. Understand responsiveness to realistic military requirements, specifications and cost limitations. Study the linkage between strategic planning, requirements, project organization, and technology.
  3. Operations Analysis. Learn how to apply advanced management and operations research ideas to defense problems, to include cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis. Understand uncertainty and risk and their impact on military planning, decision making and operations. Become familiar with complexity and the modeling of competitive systems. Gain a basic knowledge of modeling, simulation and gaming. Learn how Operations Research techniques, including experimental design, are applied to operational test and evaluation; planning and analyzing fleet battle experiments; and to military decision making.
  4. Sensor and Weapon Systems. Gain a solid understanding of the scientific, mathematical and engineering principles behind existing and future military systems. Understand the elements that impact sensor system performance. Understand the principles behind existing and emerging sensor technologies, including radar, sonar, electro-optical sensors, and other sensors. Understand the technologies underlying weapons systems, and the principles that guide successful integration of weapons and sensors with platforms.
  5. Information Systems Technology. Develop knowledge of information systems technology including computer systems; computer networks and communications systems; software engineering; and data base management. Demonstrate awareness of the capabilities, limitations, design and operation, and vulnerabilities of information systems. Understand the concepts of defensive and offensive Information Warfare.
  6. Independent Study. Each student must demonstrate the ability to conduct independent and team oriented research and analysis on problems that link technical solutions to tactical problems, and to present the results in writing and oral briefings. A substantive project report or thesis will be required of all students.
  7. Department of Defense Resource Allocation. Develop a working knowledge of resource allocation within the Department of Defense including the PPBE, JCIDS, and Acquisition processes.  It is imperative that students understand key issues regarding the scheduling of budget delivery to, and the related interface with Congress, as well as the critical milestones involved in development of the President's Budget.  In addition, a working knowledge of the interfaces between PPBE, JCIDS, and Acquisition is necessary to gain an appreciation for the synergies and disconnects between these two processes - and in particular to understanding the manner in which they impact warfighting acquisition programs.

Joint Professional Military Education

Completion of Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) is required for all USN officers enrolled in the 308 curriculum. Graduates will develop an understanding of warfighting within the context of operational art, to include: national military capabilities and command structure, joint and service doctrine, joint planning and execution, and joint and multinational forces and systems integration at the operational level of war.

Systems Engineering Analysis - Mixed Mode - Curriculum 309

This curriculum is closed to new admissions. Previous catalog descriptions of this curriculum are found in the Past Edition Archives at this link: http://www.nps.edu/Academics/Admissions/Registrar/AcademicCatalog

Program Officer

Keith Littrell, LCDR, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 283

(831) 656-2358, DSN 756-2358

wklittre@nps.edu