Acquisition and Contract Management Curriculum 815

The Acquisition & Contract Management Curricula are designed to develop the knowledge, skills and competencies necessary to effectively lead the acquisition workforce and efficiently manage the resources allocated to the acquisition process. The curricula focus on problem solving and decision making in a variety of acquisition situations demanding critical thinking and a balanced approach in the application of theory and practical solutions. Graduates of the curricula are expected to assume leadership positions in the acquisition workforce.

Program Officer

Jefferson E. McCollum, CDR, SC, USN

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 201

(831) 656-3953, DSN 756-3953

jemccoll@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Rene G. Rendon, D.B.A., Associate Professor

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 331D

(831) 656-3464, DSN 756-3464

rgrendon@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Acquisition and Contract Management curriculum is an interdisciplinary program which integrates management theory, accounting, economics, finance, behavioral science, management theory, operations/systems analysis, and specific courses in acquisition and contracting. The 815 curriculum includes a concentration option in strategic purchasing. Student input includes officers and civilians from all DoD services, other federal agencies and allied nations. The curriculum is designed to provide officers and civilians with the skills to serve effectively in systems buying offices, field contracting offices, contract administration offices, and contracting policy offices.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Date

January and July.

Program Length

Six Quarters.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Acquisition and Contract Management Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies naval officers as Acquisition and Contract Management Subspecialists with a subspecialty code of 1306P, Army officers as Functional Area 51C, and Marine Corps officers with a 9656 MOS. The curriculum satisfies mandatory Defense Acquisition University (DAU) contracting courses required by the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Contracting Officer:

Naval Inventory Control Point, Philadelphia, PA;

Air Force Major Weapon System Program Offices

Hardware Systems Commands (NAVAIR, NAVSEA, SPAWAR)

Air Force Major System Centers (Aeronautical System Center, Space and Missiles System Center)

Army Material Command

Major Subordinate Commands (CECOM, AMCOM)

Business/Financial Manager (BFM)

Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA)

Superintendent, Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair (SUPSHIP)

Air Force Commodity Council Contracting Officer

Air Force Regional Contracting Center Contracting Officer

Procuring Contracting Officer (Product or Logistic Center)

Administrative Contracting Officer (Defense Contract Management Agency)

Contract Negotiator (Product or Logistic Center)

Flight Commander, Major Command Headquarters

Contracting Squadron Commander (IDE graduates)

Key Staff (HQ USAF, Joint Command) (IDE graduates)

Director of Contracts:

Marine Corps Field Contracting System, Fleet and Industrial Supply Centers, Army and Navy Laboratories, Naval Regional Contracting Centers

Contracts and Business Policy:

Staff of Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition)

Staff of Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology)

Staff of Assistant Secretary of the Air Force (Acquisition)

Staff of Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics)

Curriculum Sponsor

Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Acquisition)

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 815

Within the 815 curriculum, students may substitute specialty courses in strategic purchasing at the approval of their service and the academic associate.

US Navy students also complete an additional four courses leading to the Naval War College Command and Staff program diploma.

International students take IT1500 American Life and Institutions and IT1600 Communication Skills for International Officers in Quarters one and two.

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

GB1000

(0-3)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Business Statistics & Data Analysis

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

MN3331

(5-1)

Systems Acquisition and Program Management

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communications for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

MN3303

(4-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Contract Management

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GBXXXX

(3-0)

MBA Core Elective *

MN3315

(4-0)

Acquisition Management and Contract Administration

MN3312

(4-0)

Contract Law

Quarter 5

MN3318

(3-0)

Contingency Contracting

MN4304

(2-0)

Defense Systems Contracting

MN3304

(5-2)

Contract Pricing and Negotiations

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project or Thesis

Quarter 6

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy & Policy**

MN4371

(4-0)

Acquisition and Contracting Policy

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project or Thesis

MN3306

(3-0)

Strategic Purchasing***

MN4311

(3-0)

Contracting for Services

MN3384

(4-1)

Principles of Acquisition Production and Quality Management****

* Core Elective will be selected from four available courses offered in Q4

** USN and USMC only; students may complete three additional War College classes for JPME certification

*** USN and USAF only

**** USMC and US Army only

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Acquisition Management -
Curriculum 815 Subspecialty Code 1306P

  1. Management Fundamentals: The graduate will understand the theory of and have an ability to apply accounting, economic, mathematical, statistical, managerial, and other state-of-the-art management techniques and concepts to problem solving and decision-making responsibilities as military managers.
  2. Advanced Management Concepts: The graduate will have the ability to apply advanced management and operations research techniques to defense problems. This includes policy formulation and execution, strategic planning, defense resource allocation, cost benefit and cost effectiveness analysis, federal fiscal policy, computer-based information and decision support systems, and complex managerial situations requiring comprehensive integrated decision making.
  3. Acquisition and Contracting Principles: The graduate will have an understanding of and will be able to apply the principles and fundamentals of acquisition and contracting within the federal government, including knowledge of the acquisition laws and regulations, particularly the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the DoD FAR Supplement (DFARS); the unique legal principles applied in government contract law and the Uniform Commercial Code; and the application of sound business principles and practices to defense contracting problems. Further, the graduate will be able to apply innovative and creative approaches not only to resolve difficult acquisition and contracting issues but to significantly influence the legal and regulatory structure within which acquisition decision making occurs. Finally, the graduate will have the ability to conceptualize, develop and execute strategic business alliances and relationships necessary to the successful acquisition of goods and services.
  4. Acquisition and Contracting Policy: The graduate will have an ability to formulate and execute acquisition policies, strategies, plans and procedures; a knowledge of the legislative process and an ability to research and analyze acquisition legislation; and a knowledge of the government organization for acquisition, including Congress, the General Accounting Office, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy, the federal and military contracting offices, the Boards of Contract Appeals, and the court system.
  5. Contracting Process: The graduate will understand the theory of and have the ability to manage the field contracting, contingency contracting, supplies and services contracting, system acquisition, and contract administration processes. This involves a knowledge of the defense system life cycle processes, including requirements determination, funding, contracting, ownership, and disposal; an ability to evaluate military requirements, specifications, and bids and proposals; an ability to utilize the sealed bid, competitive proposals and simplified acquisition methodologies; a comprehensive knowledge of all contract types and their application in defense acquisition; an ability to conduct cost and price analyses; and an ability to negotiate various contracting actions, including new procurement, contract changes and modifications, claims, equitable adjustment settlements, and noncompliance issues.
  6. Business Theory and Practices: The graduate will have an understanding of the business philosophy, concepts, practices, and methodologies of the global commercial industrial base, and the ability to apply these to the federal government acquisition environment.
  7. Federal and Defense Budgeting: The graduate will have an ability to apply economic and accounting principles, including monetary and fiscal theories, to defense acquisition and contracting issues.
  8. Program Management: The graduate will have an understanding of the basic principles and fundamentals of Program Management, with particular emphasis on the Procuring Contractor Officer's and Administrative Contracting Officer's roles and relationships with the Program Manager.
  9. Acquisition Workforce: The graduate will satisfy all requirements of the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) and mandatory contracting courses required by the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) at Levels I, II, III.
  10. Ethics and Standards of Conduct: The graduate will have an ability to manage and provide leadership in the ethical considerations of military acquisition, including the provisions of procurement integrity, and to appropriately apply defense acquisition standards of conduct.
  11. Strategy and Policy: Officers develop a graduate-level ability to think strategically, critically analyze past military campaigns, and apply historical lessons to future joint and combined operations, in order to discern the relationship between a nation's policies and goals and the ways military power may be used to achieve them. This is fulfilled by completing the first of the Naval War College course series leading to Service Intermediate-level Professional Military Education (PME) and Phase I Joint PME credit.
  12. Analysis, Problem Solving, and Critical Thinking: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct research and analysis, and proficiency in presenting the results in writing and orally by means of an applied project and a command-oriented briefing appropriate to this curriculum.

Systems Acquisition Management - Curriculum 816

Program Officer

Jefferson E. McCollum, CDR, SC, USN

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 201

(831) 656-3953, DSN 756-3953

jemccoll@nps.edu

Academic Associate

John Dillard, Ph.D.

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 336

(831) 656-2650, DSN 756-2650

jtdillar@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Systems Acquisition Management curriculum is an interdisciplinary program designed to integrate business principles, program leadership and management theory, operations analysis, and systems engineering applications. It is uniquely tailored to federal government acquisition management and intensive exposure to the fundamental principles of the acquisition environment. The courses in this curriculum apply business analysis and problem solving techniques essential to effective major system program management within the structure of DoD acquisition management. It further focuses on the decisions and problems facing the acquisition manager, the various forces at work within industry and government, and the impact of acquisition policies and strategies. Student input includes officers and civilians from all DoD Services, other federal agencies, and allied nations.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Dates

January and July

Program Length

Six Quarters

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Systems Acquisition Management Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an Army officer for Functional Area 51 and a Marine Corps officer for MOS 9657. Department of Defense civilians are typically members of the acquisition work force as specified by the Defense Acquisition Work force Improvement Act (DAWIA). This curriculum satisfies the mandatory Defense Acquisition University (DAU) program management education required by the Defense Acquisition Work force Improvement Act (DAWIA) for Program Management through Level III and provides up to 14 additional DAU equivalencies in other functional areas.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Program Manager/Deputy Program Manager/Program Office:

Army/Air Force/Navy/Marine Corps Acquisition Category I through III (ACAT I - III) Programs

Program Executive Officer (PEO) staff

Matrix Organization Staff

Army Materiel Command (AMC)

Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)

Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA)

Air Force Systems Command

Army Communications - Electronics Command (CECOM)

Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM)

Force Development Officer

Test and Evaluation Officer

Acquisition Logistics Officer

Curriculum Sponsor

Director, Acquisition Career Management, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology): ASA/ALT (DACM)

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 816

The 6-quarter matrix below is for US Army and USAF students.

USN, USMC and international students follow a 7-quarter program. USN students may add JPME courses.

International students also take IT1500 American Life and Institutions and IT1600 Communication Skills for International Officers in quarters one and two.

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

GB1000

(03)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Business Statistics & Data Analysis

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

MN3331

(5-1)

Principles of Systems Acquisition and Program Management

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

MN3303

(4-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Contract Management

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GBXXXX

(3-0)

MBA Core Elective *

SE4011

(3-2)

Systems Engineering for Acquisition Managers

MN3384

(4-1)

Principles of Acquisition Production and Quality Management

Quarter 5

MN3309

(4-1)

Acquisition of Embedded Weapon Systems Software

GB4410

(3-0)

Logistics Engineering

MN4602

(2-2)

Test and Evaluation Management

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project or Thesis

Quarter 6*

MN4307

(4-0)

Program Management Policy and Control

MN3315

(4-0)

Contract Administration

MN4470

(4-0)

Life Cycle Support

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project or Thesis

* Selected from three or four available courses offered in the 4th quarter.

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Systems Acquisition Management - Curriculum 816

  1. Management Fundamentals: The graduate will understand the theory of and have an ability to apply accounting, economic, mathematical, statistical, managerial, and other state-of-the-art management techniques and concepts to problem solving and decision-making responsibilities as Department of Defense managers. The graduate will have the ability to think creatively, addressing issues and problems in a dynamic, challenging environment.
  2. Advanced Leadership and Management Concepts: The graduate will have the ability to apply advanced leadership, management and operations research techniques to defense problems. This includes policy formulation and execution, strategic planning, defense resource allocation, project leadership, cost benefit and cost effectiveness analysis, federal fiscal policy, computer-based information and decision support systems, and complex managerial situations requiring comprehensive integrated leadership abilities.
  3. Program Leadership and Management Principles: The graduate will have an understanding of and will be able to apply the principles, concepts, and techniques of Program Leadership and Program Management to the acquisition of major defense weapon systems. This includes the principles of risk management and tradeoff decision analysis using Total Ownership Cost, schedule and performance dynamics from a total life cycle management perspective.
  4. Program Management Policies: The graduate will have an ability to formulate and execute defense acquisition policies, strategies, plans and procedures; an understanding of the policy-making roles of various federal agencies of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the U.S. government, particularly the Department of Defense (DoD), the General Accounting Office (GAO), congressional committees, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB); and an understanding of the strategies necessary to influence policy development and implementation.
  5. Systems and Acquisition Process: The graduate will understand the theory of and have an ability to lead program teams and manage the systems acquisition process. This involves the system life cycle process for requirements determination, research and development, funding and budgeting, procurement, systems engineering, including systems of systems, test and evaluation, manufacturing and quality control, integrated logistics support, ownership and disposal; the interrelationship between reliability, maintainability and logistics support as an element of system effectiveness in defense system and equipment design; and embedded weapon system software, particularly related to current policies and standards, software metrics, risk management, inspections, testing, integration, and post-deployment software support.
  6. Contract Management: The graduate will understand the role of the contracting process within the acquisition environment, including financial, legal, statutory, technical, and managerial constraints in the process.
  7. Business Theory and Practices: The graduate will have an understanding of the business and operating philosophies, concepts, practices and methodologies of defense industry with regard to major weapon systems acquisition, particularly the application of sound business practices.
  8. Government and Industry Budgeting and Financial Management: The graduate will have an understanding of and an ability to apply the principles of government and private organizational financing, including corporate financial structures, cost and financial accounting, capital budgeting techniques, financial analysis, and Defense financial management and budgeting processes to include the Planning, Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES).
  9. Acquisition Work force: The graduate will satisfy all requirements of the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) and mandatory program management courses required by the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) at Levels I, II, and III.
  10. Ethics and Standards of Conduct: The graduate will have an ability to manage and provide leadership in the ethical considerations of defense acquisition, including the provisions of procurement integrity, and to appropriately apply defense acquisition standards of conduct.
  11. Analysis, Problem Solving, and Critical Thinking: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct research and analysis, and proficiency in presenting the results in writing and orally by means of an applied project and a command-oriented briefing appropriate to this curriculum.

Financial Management Curriculum

Program Officer

Jefferson E. McCollum, CDR, SC, USN

Ingersoll Hall, Room 201

(831) 656-3953, DSN 756-3953

jemccoll@nps.edu

Academic Associate (837)

Philip J. Candreva

Ingersoll Hall, Room 215

(831) 656-2884

pjcandre@nps.edu

Master of Arts in Management Program (MAM) - 834

Brief Overview

The objective of the MAM with Financial Management focus – is to expose officers to and to teach business, financial, and analysis practices, techniques, and policies. From staff to line, career fields within DON increasingly require some aspect of financial management. This degree does not create FM experts but rather provides a solid basis for DoN decision makers to be aware of and be able to use the available accurate, timely and relevant information and analysis to inform their decisions. Managers concerned with the optimal allocation of resources to achieve the DoN's goals and objectives while assuring efficient and effective expenditure of public funds will benefit from this degree. Graduates of the MAM with FM focus curriculum will be prepared to return to the fleet with a greater understanding of strategic planning, business analysis, financial analysis, budgeting, accounting, business and financial management.

Graduate courses cover topics such as FM policy and practice; cost, operations, supply chain, IT, and strategic management; organizational effectiveness; ethics and communications for managers; business statistics, economic analysis and financial reporting.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades and an APC of 245 is required for entry.

Entry Dates

January

Program Length

18 months (6 months DL + 12 months Resident)

Degree

Requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Management are met by:

  1. Completion (excluding by validation) of a minimum of 44 credit hours of graduate-level GB/MN courses, at least 18 of which are at the 4000 level. (Credit hours required for the degree project do not count toward the 44 credit hour minimum requirement.)
  2. Completion of the core MBA management, ethics, acquisition, economics, and quantitative GB/MN courses
  3. Completion of an approved sequence of financial management courses totaling at least 14 credit hours
  4. Completion of an acceptable application project or thesis.
  5. Approval of the candidate's program by the Dean, GSBPP.

Curriculum Sponsor

N-82, Director, Office of Budget and Fiscal Management Division.

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 834

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB4070

(4-0)

Energy Economics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and War

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

MN3301

(4-0)

Systems Acquisition

GB4021

(3-0)

Strategic Management of Information Technology

NW3285

(4-0)

Theatre Security Decision Making

GB3510

(3-0)

Defense Financial Management Practice

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

NW3275

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Operations (Part 1)

GB4090

(3-0)

Capstone Project (taken twice)

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling & Analysis

NW3276

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Operations (Part 2)

Curriculum Sponsor and Educational Skill Requirements Approval Authority

Chief of Naval Operations (N8/N82)

Financial Management - Curriculum 837

Brief Overview

The objective of the Financial Management Curriculum is to prepare officers for business, financial, and analysis positions within the DoN and DoD. Financial Managers assist the DoN's decision-making processes at all levels by providing accurate, timely and relevant information and analysis. They are concerned with the optimal allocation of human, physical and financial resources to achieve the DoN's goals and objectives while assuring efficient and effective expenditure of public funds. Graduates of the Financial Management Curriculum will be prepared for assignment to positions in strategic planning, business analysis, financial analysis, budgeting, accounting, business and financial management, and internal control systems and auditing.

Graduate courses cover topics such as financial reporting standards, cost standards, cost analysis, budgeting and financial management, internal control, auditing, management planning and control systems, strategic resource management, quantitative techniques used in planning and control, system acquisition and program management, and the Planning Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES) used within the Department of Defense.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Dates

January and July

Program Length

Six Quarters

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Financial Management Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies a U.S. Navy officer as a Financial Management Subspecialist, subspecialty code 3110P. Completion qualifies a U.S. Marine Corps officer for MOS 9644.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Comptroller: Naval Bases/Naval Air Stations/SYSCOMs

Budget Analyst: Office of Budget, N-82 SYSCOMS, U.S. STRATCOM

Public Works Officer: CONUS/OUTCONUS

Comptroller: Naval Hospitals

Business Financial Managers: Program Offices

Action Officer/Program Analyst: OSD

Budget Analyst: OPNAV

Fiscal Officer: BUMED

Budget Officer: CINPACFLT/CINCLANTFLT

Curriculum Sponsor

N-82, Director, Office of Budget and Fiscal Management Division.

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 837

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

GB1000

(0-3)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy***

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

GB4550

(4-0)

Advanced Financial Reporting

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GBXXXX

(2-0)

MBA Core Elective **

GB4530

(3-0)

Management Control Systems

MN3301

(4-0)

Systems Acquisition*

GB3510

(3-0)

Defense Financial Management Practice

Quarter 5

GB4510

(4-0)

Strategic Resource Management

GB4540

(2-0)

Financial Management Seminar

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project ****

Quarter 6

GB4520

(3-0)

Internal Control and Audit

MN4157

(3-0)

Seminar in Management Accounting

GB4560

(3-0)

Defense Financial Management

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project ****

* Equivalent to DAU courses ACQ101 & ACQ102. May be replaced by MN3331. May be replaced by GB3031 for international students.

** Selected from four available courses offered in the 4th quarter.

*** Not required for International students, US Army or USAF. International students take American Life and Institutions (IT1500) and Communication Skills for International Officers (IT1600) in quarters 1 and 2.

**** Students may elect to complete a thesis.

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Financial Management - Curriculum 837
Subspecialty Code 3110P

  1. Management Fundamentals: The graduate will have the ability to apply quantitative techniques, accounting, economics, finance, organization theory, information technology, and other state-of-the-art management techniques and concepts to military management problems. Also, the graduate will know basic management theory and practice, embracing leadership, ethics, written and oral communication, organization design, team building, human resource management, conflict resolution, quality assurance, cost-benefit analysis, risk analysis, stakeholder analysis, and planning within military organizations, as well as military sub-units and activities. This ensures internal and external constituencies are considered in resource management.
  2. Strategic Vision and Defense Budgeting: The graduate will understand the roles of the executive and legislative branches in strategic planning, setting federal fiscal policy, allocating resources to national defense, budget formulation, budget negotiation, budget justification, and budget execution strategies, including the principles of Federal Appropriations Law. In addition, the graduate will have knowledge of all aspects of the federal, Defense, and Navy budget cycles including the Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System with emphasis on budget formulation and execution.
  3. Funds Management: In support of approved programs, the graduate will be able to manage appropriated, revolving, and non-appropriated funds in compliance with regulations of the Comptroller of the Navy and the federal government. Also, the graduate will be able to develop and review financial reports, analyze budget execution against operating and financial plans, develop alternate plans based on analyses of an activity's financial performance, and prepare recommendations or make decisions regarding the reallocation or reprogramming of funds. The guidelines of the Defense Finance and Accounting System and the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board are relevant.
  4. Accountability, Control, and Auditing: The graduate will be able to acquire and analyze financial data and communicate the results to a diverse audience, including maintaining an integrated financial information system and appropriate internal controls to ensure timely, accurate, and consistent financial information. In accordance with the auditing standards of the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the Defense and Navy audit organizations, and the professional standards of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the graduate will learn to apply audit techniques that enforce sound internal accounting and administrative controls, safeguard defense assets, and assure the completeness and integrity of financial reports.
  5. Acquisition and Program Management: The graduate will understand the purpose and concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the defense systems acquisition process, and the practical application of program management methods within this process.  This includes systems acquisition management; the systems acquisition life cycle; user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling.  This satisfies the Defense Acquisition University education equivalency requirements for defense acquisition professionals as specified in Congress' Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA)
  6. Economy, Efficiency, and Effectiveness: The graduate will have the skills for solving complex and unstructured management problems in which alternatives must be identified, evaluated, and selected in accordance with economical procurement of resources, efficient utilization of resources, and effective accomplishment of overall Defense and Navy goals and objectives. This includes cost/benefit analysis, systems analysis, cost estimation, value engineering, business process reengineering, and application of relevant OMB and Defense regulations.
  7. Cost Management and Analysis: The graduate will be able to design, implement, and evaluate different costing systems encountered within Defense and Navy organizations and activities, as well as those found in private sector organizations conducting business with the federal government. In addition to private sector cost management policies and practices, the graduate will understand the application of Defense unit costing guidelines to functional business areas, and the Office of Management and Budget's Cost Accounting Standards for major suppliers of goods and services to the federal government.
  8. Strategic Resource Management: The graduate will have knowledge of strategic vision and strategic core competency concepts for setting long-range goals and objectives; designing programs to achieve objectives; assigning individual responsibility for resource management, actions, and decision making; measuring performance; reporting results; and evaluating and rewarding performance. This includes assessing customer needs and customer satisfaction, making recommendations, and implementing improvements in the effective delivery of goods and services to customers or users.
  9. Innovation and Creativity: The graduate will demonstrate innovation and creativity in developing solutions to complex financial, budget, and program management issues that increase program effectiveness and customer satisfaction, while controlling the efficient utilization of financial, physical, and human resources. This involves the ability to identify problems and potential concerns, providing leadership, and teaming with others in the decision making process, and obtaining support for recommended decisions or courses of action.
  10. Strategy and Policy: Officers develop a graduate-level ability to think strategically, critically analyze past military campaigns, and apply historical lessons to future joint and combined operations, in order to discern the relationship between a nation's policies and goals and the ways military power may be used to achieve them. Fulfilled by completing the first of the Naval War College series leading to Service Intermediate-level Professional Military Education (PME) and Phase I Joint PME credit.

Curriculum Sponsor and Educational Skill Requirements Approval Authority:

Financial Management (837):
Chief of Naval Operations (N8/N82)

Financial Management (Energy Specialty) - 838

Brief Overview

The objective of the Financial Management – Energy Specialty Curriculum is to prepare officers for business, financial, and analysis positions within the DoN and DoD and also to provide an advanced education in energy-related problem solving. Financial Managers assist the DoN's decision-making processes at all levels by providing accurate, timely and relevant information and analysis. They are concerned with the optimal allocation of human, physical, financial, and energy resources to achieve the DoN's goals and objectives while assuring efficient and effective expenditure of public funds. Graduates of the Financial Management – Energy Specialty curriculum will be prepared for assignment to positions in strategic planning, business analysis, financial analysis, budgeting, accounting, business and financial management, and internal control systems and auditing.

Graduate courses cover topics such as energy economics, energy strategy and policy, financial reporting standards, cost standards, cost analysis, budgeting and financial management, internal control, auditing, management planning and control systems, strategic resource management, quantitative techniques used in planning and control, system acquisition and program management, and the Planning Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES) used within the Department of Defense.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Dates

January and July

Program Length

18 months (six quarters)

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Financial Management Subspecialty

3113-P: Financial Management with Energy Focus

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

AVIATOR/N432D FLY HRS PROGRAM

SUP PLN/SPEC ASST TASK FORCE ENERGY/N43E

LIAISON R&D/N402B LOG TECH

LOGISTICS/SPECIAL ASSIST FOR OPER LOGS

SUP LOG/LOGISTICS/PLNS OFF (N412)

TRA PLN AVFLGT/AIROPS/FHP

PRCM MGMT/SURFACE MOBILITY PROG MGR

Curriculum Sponsor

N-82, Director, Office of Budget and Fiscal Management Division and N45, Energy and Environmental Readiness Division.

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 838

GB3013

(0-2)

Problem Analysis and Ethical Dilemmas

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB4070

(4-0)

Energy Economics

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and War

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

GB4550

(4-0)

Advanced Financial Reporting

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

MN3810

(4-0)

Fundamentals in Energy Technology Adoption

GB4530

(3-0)

Management Control Systems

MN3301

(4-0)

Systems Acquisition*

GB3510

(3-0)

Defense Financial Management Practice

GB4510

(4-0)

Strategic Resource Management

OS3007

(4-0)

OR for Energy Systems Analysts

GB4090

(0-6)

MBA Project

GB4520

(3-0)

Internal Control and Audit

NS4053

(4-0)

Energy Security: History, Politics, and Policy

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

PH3700

(4-0)

Energy Fundamentals

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)


Management Fundamentals; Strategic Vision and Defense Budgeting; Funds Management; Accountability, Control and Auditing; Acquisition and Program Management; Economy, Efficiency, and Effectiveness; Cost Management and Analysis; Strategic Resources Management; Innovation and Creativity; Strategy and Policy; Energy Emphasis.

Curriculum Sponsor and Educational Skill Requirements Approval Authority

Chief of Naval Operations (N8/N82) and (N45)

Information Management Curriculum

The Information Age has generated a revolution in the means in which we conduct business and warfare. New technologies have changed the traditional views of the marketplace, supply chain management, and logistics. As the range and complexity of computer applications have grown, the need to manage and exploit those resources has increased. This curriculum provides both the technical skills and business acumen to deal with a constantly evolving digital world.

Program Officer

Jefferson E. McCollum, CDR, SC, USN

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 201

(831) 656-3953, DSN 756-3953

jemccoll@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Glenn R. Cook

Code IS, Glasgow West, Room GW-3012

(831) 656-2778, DSN 756-2778

grcook@nps.edu

Information Management - Curriculum 870

Brief Overview

The Information Systems Management graduate shall have the knowledge skills and competencies to: 1) Manage the acquisition of Information Systems; 2) Manage Information Systems and infrastructure support afloat and ashore; 3) Solve Information Systems engineering and management problems individually and in teams; 4) Effectively manage and lead in today's constantly changing digital world; 5) Develop and implement effective strategies and policies to take advantage of technological opportunities and mitigate risk; 6) Assimilate new technologies and transform organizations, processes, and strategies to compete in the marketplace or on the battlefield. These general education skill requirements are supported by the following topical educational skill requirements.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Dates

July

Program Length

Six Quarters (no P-Code); Seven Quarters (1309P with JPME I)

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies a U.S. Navy officer as a Logistics - Information Technology subspecialist (subspecialty code 1309P). The 1309P code is applicable only to Supply Corps Officers (3100/3105/3107).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Project /Program Manager, Hardware Systems Command

Business Systems Center, Project Officer

Business Manager, PEO

CIO, Acquisition Office

Curriculum Sponsor

Naval Supply Systems Command

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 870

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

IS3502

(4-2)

Network Operations I

GB1000

(0-3)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GBXXXX

(3-0)

MBA Core Elective **

IS4300

(3-2)

Software Engineering/Project Mgmt

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy & War

Quarter 5

IS3200

(3-2)

Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design

IS3201

(4-2)

Enterprise Database Management Systems

IS4220

(3-2)

Technology Enabled Process Improvement

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project ***

Quarter 6

CS3600

(4-2)

Information Assurance

IS3301

(3-2)

Decision Support Systems

IS4182

(4-0)

Enterprise Information Systems Strategy and Policy

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project ***

* NW3230 required for USN and USMC; students completing JPME take all four Naval War College classes.

** Selected from four available courses offered in the 4th quarter.

*** Students may elect to complete a thesis.

International students take American Life and Institutions (IT1500) and Communication Skills for International Officers (IT1600) in quarters 1 and 2.

Educational Skills Requirements for Information Systems Management - Curriculum 870
Subspecialty 1309P

  1. Management Fundamentals: The graduate will have the ability to apply quantitative accounting, economics, information technology, and other management techniques and concepts to military management problems. Also, the graduate will know management theory and practices, including leadership, communications, organizational design, staffing, quality and planning within large public and private sector organizations with a focus on military sub-units and activities.
  2. Information Systems Technology: The officer will have a thorough knowledge of information systems management to include: 1) computer system components; 2) computer networks: network architectures, protocols and standards; 3) database management systems: database technologies, object-oriented databases, data warehouses, OLAP, technical and administrative issues involved in the design, implementation and maintenance of database management systems.
  3. Decision Support and Knowledge Management Systems: The student will have a thorough knowledge of problem identification, formulation, and application of systems to support decision making. The student will understand the purpose of executive information systems, group decision support systems, and contingency management systems and their potential impacts on public organizations and missions. The student will also be familiar with knowledge collection technologies designed to capture, categorize, store, retrieve and present knowledge.
  4. Computer Security: The student will gain fundamental knowledge of the methods for ensuring integrity, confidentiality, authentication, and availability of computer resources, distributed databases, and networks.
  5. Information Systems Analysis and Management: The officer will have a thorough knowledge of the following concepts to effectively manage the application of information systems to organizational goals: 1) Managerial Concepts: decision-making theory, microeconomics, marketing, operations analysis, statistics, financial management, organizational development, and research methodologies; 2) Evaluation of Information Systems: cost-performance (effectiveness) analysis; selection, evaluation, acquisition, installation and effective utilization of information systems hardware and software risk assessment; 3) Systems Analysis and Design: information systems feasibility, life cycle management, system requirements determination, system performance evaluation, conversion and maintenance of legacy systems, post-implementation evaluation; 4) Management of Information Systems: metrics evaluation, monitoring, capacity planning, human resource management, budgeting and financial control of computer centers, design of effective organization structure, understanding architectural constraints, control and security (INFOSEC) policies, and training requirements for both the user and support staff; 5) Adapting to Technological, Organizational, and Economic Changes: Evaluation of potential impacts of new technology on information systems and organizational strategy.
  6. Military Applications: The officer must be able to combine analytical methods and technical expertise with operational experience for effective military applications to include: 1) DoD Decision-Making Process on Information Systems: DoD, DoN, OMB, and congressional decision making on information systems matters; 2) Information Technology Acquisition Management: Acquisition policies and procedures of the DoD, including: statutory framework, acquisition planning, contracting, and the planning, programming, and budgeting system; 3) Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) Level 1.
  7. Independent Research: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research analysis and proficiency in communicating the results in writing and orally by means of a field application study. The research in information technology and its management will include problem formulation, decision criteria specification, decision modeling, data collection and experimentation, analysis, and evaluation.

Defense Management Curricula

The Defense Management Curricula serve U.S. and international officers. The overriding objective of the curricula is to provide students with the analytical skills and critical thinking ability to solve problems and make decisions they confront in both operational and staff jobs. Students may design their own concentrations to meet their organizations' unique staffing and operational needs. International officers in the Resource Planning and Management for International Defense curriculum blend courses from the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy and the National Security Affairs Department into an integrated Defense Resource program of study.

Program Officer

Jefferson E. McCollum, CDR, SC, USN

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 201

(831) 656-3953, DSN 756-3953

jemccoll@nps.edu

Defense Business Management - Curriculum 809

Academic Associate

James Suchan, Ph.D.

Code GB/Su, Ingersoll Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-2905, DSN 756-2905

jsuchan@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This interdisciplinary curriculum integrates within the defense context coursework in accounting, economics, mathematics, communications, management theory, and operations/systems analysis. As a result, students develop the analytical, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills not only to understand and critically assess the processes by which management in a defense organization is accomplished, but also to manage and allocate wisely defense resources, evaluate written research, and analyze products of others throughout their careers.

In addition, this curriculum permits students to design their own concentration. Students work with their Academic Associate to determine the concentration areas and courses that meet their sponsoring agency needs. Students are free to choose among any of the specific management areas available. For example, a student may elect to specialize in the relevant portion of a functional area, such as financial management, logistics, human resources and organization management, acquisition, or manpower and personnel analysis. Or, the student may choose to follow a general management program, which would include an overall balance of courses from many functional areas.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Dates

January and July

Program Length

Six Quarters

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Subspecialty

Determined in consultation with the Academic Associate.

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 809

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

GB1000

(0-3)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and FM Policy

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GBXXXX

(2-0)

MBA Core Elective *

GB3031

(2-0)

Principles of Acquisition Management

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

Quarter 5

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project **

Quarter 6

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(V-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project **

* Selected from four available courses offered in the 4th quarter.

** Students may elect to complete a thesis.

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Defense Business Management - Curriculum 809

  1. Management Fundamentals: The graduate will have the ability to apply quantitative techniques, accounting, economics, finance, organization theory, information technology, and other state-of-the-art management techniques and concepts to military management problems. Also, the graduate will know basic management theory and practice, embracing leadership, ethics, written and oral communication, organization design, team building, human resource management, conflict resolution, quality assurance, cost-benefit analysis, risk analysis, stakeholder analysis, and planning within military organizations, as well as military sub-units and activities. This ensures internal and external constituencies are considered in resource management.
  2. Strategic Vision and Defense Budgeting: The graduate will understand the roles of the executive and legislative branches in strategic planning, setting federal fiscal policy, allocating resources to national defense, budget formulation, budget negotiation, budget justification, and budget execution strategies, including the principles of Federal Appropriations Law. In addition, the graduate will have knowledge of all aspects of the federal, Defense, and Navy budget cycles including the Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System with emphasis on budget formulation and execution.
  3. Funds Management: In support of approved programs, the graduate will be able to manage appropriated, revolving, and non-appropriated funds in compliance with regulations of the Comptroller of the Navy and the federal government. Also, the graduate will be able to develop and review financial reports, analyze budget execution against operating and financial plans, develop alternate plans based on analyses of an activity's financial performance, and prepare recommendations or make decisions regarding the reallocation or reprogramming of funds. The guidelines of the Defense Finance and Accounting System and the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board are relevant.
  4. Accountability, Control, and Auditing: The graduate will be able to acquire and analyze financial data and communicate the results to a diverse audience, including maintaining an integrated financial information system and appropriate internal controls to ensure timely, accurate, and consistent financial information. In accordance with the auditing standards of the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the Defense and Navy audit organizations, and the professional standards of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the graduate will learn to apply audit techniques that enforce sound internal accounting and administrative controls, safeguard defense assets, and assure the completeness and integrity of financial reports.
  5. Acquisition and Program Management: The graduate will understand the purpose and concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the defense systems acquisition process, and the practical application of program management methods within this process. This includes systems acquisition management; the systems acquisition life cycle; user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. This satisfies the Defense Acquisition University education equivalency requirements for defense acquisition professionals as specified in Congress' Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA)
  6. Economy, Efficiency, and Effectiveness: The graduate will have the skills for solving complex and unstructured management problems in which alternatives must be identified, evaluated, and selected in accordance with economical procurement of resources, efficient utilization of resources, and effective accomplishment of overall Defense and Navy goals and objectives. This includes cost/benefit analysis, systems analysis, cost estimation, value engineering, business process reengineering, and application of relevant OMB and Defense regulations.
  7. Cost Management and Analysis: The graduate will be able to design, implement, and evaluate different costing systems encountered within Defense and Navy organizations and activities, as well as those found in private sector organizations conducting business with the federal government. In addition to private sector cost management policies and practices, the graduate will understand the application of Defense unit costing guidelines to functional business areas, and the Office of Management and Budget's Cost Accounting Standards for major suppliers of goods and services to the federal government.
  8. Strategic Resource Management: The graduate will have knowledge of strategic vision and strategic core competency concepts for setting long-range goals and objectives; designing programs to achieve objectives; assigning individual responsibility for resource management, actions, and decision making; measuring performance; reporting results; and evaluating and rewarding performance. This includes assessing customer needs and customer satisfaction, making recommendations, and implementing improvements in the effective delivery of goods and services to customers or users.
  9. Innovation and Creativity: The graduate will demonstrate innovation and creativity in developing solutions to complex financial, budget, and program management issues that increase program effectiveness and customer satisfaction, while controlling the efficient utilization of financial, physical, and human resources. This involves the ability to identify problems and potential concerns, providing leadership, and teaming with others in the decision-making process, and obtaining support for recommended decisions or courses of action.
  10. Strategy and Policy: Officers develop a graduate-level ability to think strategically, critically analyze past military campaigns, and apply historical lessons to future joint and combined operations, in order to discern the relationship between a nation's policies and goals and the ways military power may be used to achieve them. Fulfilled by completing the first of the Naval War College series leading to Service Intermediate-level Professional Military Education (PME) and Phase I Joint PME credit.

Defense Systems Management-International - Curriculum 818

Academic Associate

Simonia Blassingame, CDR, USN

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 238

(831) 656-2697, DSN 756-2697

slblassi@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This curriculum is designed for international students. It provides international officers with the core MBA interdisciplinary techniques of quantitative problem-solving methods, management theory, management science, economic analysis, and financial management. These skills enable the officers to manage and allocate defense resources, evaluate written research, and analyze products of others throughout their careers. The curriculum will further provide the officers with the specific functional skills required for effective leadership and defense resources management.

This curriculum permits students the opportunity to design their own concentration. Concentration areas and courses are determined after consultation with the Academic Associate. The 818 program allows students to design a program of course work specific to management effectiveness in the host country's military system. The student may elect to specialize in the relevant portion of a functional area, such as financial management, logistics, human resources and organization management, or manpower and personnel analysis. Or, the student may choose to follow a general management program, which would include an overall balance of courses from many functional areas. International students are free to choose any of the specific management curricula available.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Dates

January and July

Program Length

Six Quarters

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Subspecialty

Determined in consultation with the Academic Associate.

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

GB1000

(0-3)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

IT1600

(3-0)

Communication Skills for International Officers (if needed)

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

IT1500

(4-0)

American Life and Institutions

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GBXXXX

(3-0)

MBA Core Elective *

GB3031

(2-0)

Principles of Acquisition Management

GB4999

(4-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

Quarter 5

GB4999

(4-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(4-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(4-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project **

Quarter 6

GB4999

(4-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(4-0)

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project **

* Selected from four available courses offered in the 4th quarter.

** Students may elect to complete a thesis.

Resource Planning and Management - International - Curriculum 820

Academic Associate

Simonia Blassingame, CDR, USN

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 238

(831) 656-2697, DSN 756-2697

slblassi@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Resource Planning and Management for International Defense curriculum is an interdisciplinary program designed exclusively for officers and civilian employees in defense agencies of other countries. The program focuses on economic analysis, the management of financial, material, and human resources, domestic and international political institutions, civil-military relations, and the role of international law. The curriculum includes a combination of existing courses within the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy and the Department of National Security Affairs, and courses especially designed for this program. In the majority of courses, international students will study and learn with U.S. students from several other management and national security affairs curricula.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Dates

January and July

Program Length

Six Quarters

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 820

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

GB1000

(0-3)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

IT1600

(3-0)

Communication Skills for International Officers (if needed)

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

IT1500

(4-0)

American Life and Institutions

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

NS3023

(4-0)

Introduction to Comparative Politics

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GBXXXX

(3-0)

MBA Core Elective *

NS3900

(4-0)

International Law and Organizations

NS3030

(4-0)

American National Security Policy

Quarter 5

NS3041

(4-0)

Comparative Economic Systems

NS3025

(4-0)

Introduction to Civil-Military Relations

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project **

Quarter 6

NS4235

(4-0)

Diplomacy & Strategic Coalitions - Operations other than War

GB4090

(0-6)

Application Project **

GB4999

(4-0)

Elective

* Selected from four available courses offered in the 4th quarter.

** Students may elect to complete a thesis.

Master of Science in Management Programs

Program Officer

Jefferson E. McCollum, CDR, USN, SC

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 201

(831) 656-3953, DSN 756-3953

jemccoll@nps.edu

The Master of Science in Management program prepares graduates to manage in complex defense organizations and to conduct rigorous analyses of organizational problems, policies and operations. To accomplish these goals, the program places particular emphasis on developing students’ mathematical and statistical skills and their ability to analyze and model complex phenomena. Program graduates will:

The Master of Science in Management degree requires:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 48 credit hours of graduate-level courses, at least 12 hours of which are at the 4000 level.
  2. Completion or validation of the Management Fundamentals program, which consists of a total of 32 quarter-hours of 2000 and 3000 level courses, including a minimum of the following hours by discipline:

    Accounting and Financial Management

    (6)

    Economics

    (6)

    Organization and Management

    (6)

    Quantitative Methods

    (8)

  3. Completion of an approved sequence of courses in the student's area of concentration.
  4. Completion of an acceptable thesis.
  5. Approval of the candidate's program by the Dean, GSBPP.

Defense Systems Analysis - Curriculum 817

Academic Associate

Donald E. Summers, M.S.

Code GB/Ds, Ingersoll Hall, Room 337

(831) 656-3632, DSN 756-3632

desummer@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This curriculum provides officers with the fundamental interdisciplinary techniques of quantitative problem-solving methods, behavioral and management science, economic analysis, and financial management. The curriculum educates students to evaluate others' research and analysis and to develop in them sound management and leadership skills. This curriculum is an interdisciplinary program that integrates mathematics, accounting, economics, behavioral science, management theory, operations/systems analysis, and a subspecialty into an understanding of the process by which the defense mission is accomplished.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Dates

January and July

Program Length

Six Quarters

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Management (MSM) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Subspecialty

U.S. Marine Corps officers completing this curriculum fulfill the requirements for MOS 8852.

Curriculum Sponsor

Programs and Resources, Headquarters Marine Corps

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 817

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

GB1000

(0-3)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

MN2039

(4-0)

Basic Quant Methods in Econ Analysis

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget & FM Policy

MN4110

(4-1)

Multivariate Manpower Data Analysis I

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

GB4044

(3-0)

Defense Focused Managerial Inquiry

MN3331

(5-1)

Systems Acquisition & Project Management

MN0810

(0-8)

Thesis

Quarter 5

GB4510

(4-0)

Strategic Resource Management

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

GB4440

(4-0)

Simulation Modeling for Management Decision Making

MN0810

(0-8)

Thesis

Quarter 6

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy & War

MN0810

(0-8)

Thesis

GB4999

(V-0)*

Curriculum Elective Course

GB4999

(V-0)*

Curriculum Elective Course

*V=variable. May be 3000 or 4000 level course.

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Defense Systems Analysis - Curriculum 817

  1. Management Fundamentals: The graduate will have the ability to apply quantitative techniques, accounting, economics, finance, organization theory, information technology, and other state-of-the-art management techniques and concepts to military management problems. Also, the graduate will know basic management theory and practice, embracing leadership, ethics, written and oral communication, organization design, team building, human resource management, conflict resolution, quality assurance, cost-benefit analysis, risk analysis, stakeholder analysis, and planning within military organizations, as well as military sub-units and activities. This ensures internal and external constituencies are considered in resource management.
  2. Strategic Vision and Defense Budgeting: The graduate will understand the roles of the executive and legislative branches in strategic planning, setting federal fiscal policy, allocating resources to national defense, budget formulation, budget negotiation, budget justification, and budget execution strategies, including the principles of Federal Appropriations Law. In addition, the graduate will have knowledge of all aspects of the federal, Defense, and Navy budget cycles including the Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System with emphasis on budget formulation and execution.
  3. Modeling and Analysis: The graduate will be well-versed in applications of probability and statistics to the modeling, simulation, and analysis of military decision problems. The graduate will have gained knowledge in all aspects of analytical studies, including reviewing, critiquing, highlighting critical assumptions, recognizing strengths and weakness of applied analytical methodologies, and evaluating study recommendations. In addition, the graduate will be able to design and conduct analytical studies. This includes formulating problems, using the analytical process to define study requirements, applying appropriate analytical methodologies, and presenting the results effectively both orally and in writing.
  4. Acquisition and Program Management: The graduate will understand the purpose and concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the defense systems acquisition process, and the practical application of program management methods within this process. This includes systems acquisition management; the systems acquisition life cycle; user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. This satisfies the Defense Acquisition University education equivalency requirements for defense acquisition professionals as specified in Congress' Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA)
  5. Economy, Efficiency, and Effectiveness: The graduate will have the skills for solving complex and unstructured management problems in which alternatives must be identified, evaluated, and selected in accordance with economical procurement of resources, efficient utilization of resources, and effective accomplishment of overall Defense and Navy goals and objectives. This includes cost/benefit analysis, systems analysis, cost estimation, value engineering, business process reengineering, and application of relevant OMB and Defense regulations.
  6. Cost Management and Analysis: The graduate will be able to design, implement, and evaluate different costing systems encountered within Defense and Navy organizations and activities, as well as those found in private sector organizations conducting business with the federal government. In addition to private sector cost management policies and practices, the graduate will understand the application of Defense unit costing guidelines to functional business areas, and the Office of Management and Budget's Cost Accounting Standards for major suppliers of goods and services to the federal government.
  7. Strategic Resource Management: The graduate will have knowledge of strategic vision and strategic core competency concepts for setting long-range goals and objectives; designing programs to achieve objectives; assigning individual responsibility for resource management, actions, and decision making; measuring performance; reporting results; and evaluating and rewarding performance. This includes assessing customer needs and customer satisfaction, making recommendations, and implementing improvements in the effective delivery of goods and services to customers or users.
  8. Innovation and Creativity: The graduate will demonstrate innovation and creativity in developing solutions to complex financial, budget, and program management issues that increase program effectiveness and customer satisfaction, while controlling the efficient utilization of financial, physical, and human resources. This involves the ability to identify problems and potential concerns, providing leadership, and teaming with others in the decision-making process, and obtaining support for recommended decisions or courses of action.
  9. Strategy and Policy: Officers develop a graduate-level ability to think strategically, critically analyze past military campaigns, and apply historical lessons to future joint and combined operations, in order to discern the relationship between a nation's policies and goals and the ways military power may be used to achieve them. Fulfilled by completing the first of the Naval War College series leading to Service Intermediate-level Professional Military Education (PME) and Phase I Joint PME credit.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority:

Programs and Resources (P&R), HQ, USMC

Manpower Systems Analysis - Curriculum 847

Academic Associate

Yu-Chu Shen, Ph.D.

Ingersoll Hall, Room 204

(831) 656-2951, DSN 756-2951

yshen@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Manpower Systems Analysis Curriculum (MSA) leading to the MSM degree is designed for U.S. and international officers. Officers enrolled in the Manpower Systems Analysis curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate School undertake the challenge of an academic program designed to fill leadership and analytical roles in military manpower personnel, training, and education management. MSA subspecialists are responsible for developing and analyzing policies to ensure that the Navy and DoD are recruiting, training, utilizing and retaining personnel in the most efficient and effective ways possible. MSA is an analytical curriculum intended to develop skills necessary to perform and evaluate manpower analyses and manage the Navy's Human Resource community of interest. As such, the curriculum emphasizes mathematical, statistical, and other quantitative and qualitative analysis methods. Successful completion of the curriculum yields an officer skilled in conducting manpower personnel, training, and education policy analysis. The areas covered in the MSA curriculum include an understanding of manpower, personnel, training, education policy development, managing diversity, compensation systems, enlistment supply and retention models, manpower training models, manpower requirements determination processes, career mix, enlistment and reenlistment incentives, training effectiveness measures, and hardware/manpower trade-offs. Students gain familiarity with current models and methods of manpower analysis and economics as well as military manpower organizations, information systems and issues. The curriculum directly supports the Navy Human Resource Community of Interest.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of at least two semesters of college algebra or trigonometry is considered to be the minimum mathematical preparation. Additional preparation in calculus and statistics is advisable. An APC of 345 is required for entry. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements. Prospective students electing MSA as a curriculum must be adequately prepared by their undergraduate course work and comfortably oriented to a quantitatively and analytically rigorous graduate curriculum.

Entry Date

July

Program Length

Seven Quarters

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Management (MSM) degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skills Requirements.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as a Manpower Systems Analysis Subspecialist, subspecialty code 3130P. U.S. Marine Corps officers qualify for MOS 9640.

Curriculum Sponsors

OPNAV, N-1, Chief of Naval Personnel and Subject Matter Expert, OPNAV, N14, Director of Strategic Planning and Analysis

Military Personnel Plans and Policy and Headquarters - United States Marine Corps (Manpower & Reserve Affairs)

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Military Personnel Policy and Career Progression (N13)

Joint Manpower Management Branch, JCS (J-1)

Manpower Resources Branch, Director Total Force Programming/Manpower (N12)

Manpower and Training Analyst, DCNO (Resources, Warfare Requirements and Assessment (N801D)

Manpower Plans, COMCDRPAC/COMCDRLANT (N1)

Naval Manpower Analysis Center (NAVMAC)

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, BUMED

Marine Corps MCCDC and M&RA

Headquarters - United States Marine Corps Manpower & Reserve Affairs (M&RA)

Marine Corps Combat Development Command (MCCDC)

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 847

Quarter 1

GB3014

(1-0)

Ethics for Public Managers

GB3010

(4-0)

Managing for Organizational Effectiveness

GB3050

(4-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

GB3070

(4-0)

Economics of the Global Defense Environment

GB1000

(0-3)

Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and War

Quarter 2

GB3040

(4-0)

Managerial Statistics

GB3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

GB4071

(4-0)

Economic Analysis & Defense Resource Allocation

MN2111

(2-0)

Navy Manpower, Personnel, and Training Systems I

MN2039

(4-0)

Basic Quantitative Methods in Econ Analysis

Quarter 3

GB3012

(3-0)

Communication for Managers

GB4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling Analysis

GB4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

MN4110

(4-1)

Multivariate Manpower Data Analysis I

MN3111

(4-0)

Human Resource Management

Quarter 4

GB4014

(4-0)

Strategic Management

 

 

 

MN4760

(4-0)

Manpower Economics

MN4111

(4-1)

Multivariate Data Analysis II

NW3275*

(4-0)

JPME Requirement

Elective

(4-0)

Elective Course

Quarter 5

MN4119/

MN4130

(3-0)

Manpower Requirements Determination

OS4701

(4-0)

Manpower and Personnel Models

MN4106

(4-0)

Manpower and Personnel Policy Analysis

MN4761

(4-0)

Applied Manpower Analysis

MN2112

(4-0)

HR Issues II

NW3276*

(2-2)

JPME Requirement

Quarter 6

MN0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MN4115

(4-0)

Training Development

Elective

(4-0)

Elective Course

NW3285*

(4-0)

JPME Requirement

Quarter 7

MN0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MN0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MN0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Elective

(4-0)

Elective Course

* Not required for International students, US Army or USAF. International students take American Life and Institutions (IT1500) and Communication Skills for International Officers (IT1600) in quarters 1 and 2. USN students can complete JPME by taking four Naval War College courses.

Course Elective Options

GB3020

(3-0)

Fundamentals of Information Technology

OA3411

(3-0)

Introduction to Human Systems Integration

MN4114

(4-0)

Sociological and Psychological Perspectives on Military Service

MV4002

(4-1)

Simulation and Training

OA4109

(4-2)

Survey Research Methods

IS3201

(4-2)

Fundamentals of Database Management Systems

IS3210

(4-0)

Defense Knowledge & Information Management

DA4110

(4-0)

Culture and Influence

GB4480

(4-0)

Supply Chain Management

GB4015

(3-0)

Management of Change

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Manpower Systems Analysis -
Curriculum 847 Subspecialty Code 3130P

  1. Management Fundamentals - Organization and Management: The graduate will have the ability to apply contemporary management principles, organizational theory, and social science methodology to the development, implementation, and management of effective MPT&E policies and programs throughout DoN/DoD. The graduate will have the ability to use and understand computer systems in problem solving and will have a basic understanding of management information systems and E-Business.
  2. Budgeting and Financial Controls: The graduate will have an understanding of basic financial management practices of DoN/DoD and will be able to conduct cost benefit analyses and participate in the budgetary planning of commands and/or DoN programs. The graduate will have an understanding of the Planning, Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES) and the ability to analyze the impact of budgetary changes on DoN/DoD manpower and personnel programs and policies.
  3. Automated Data Analysis: The graduate will possess the skills in data manipulation, statistics, and exploratory data analysis to be able to formulate and execute analyses of a wide variety of manpower, personnel, and training issues. The graduate will have proficiency in computing and interactively apply a variety of methods to large-scale DoN and DoD databases. The graduate will have a working understanding of the manpower information systems.
  4. Management Fundamentals - Analytical Techniques: The graduate will be able to apply mathematical, statistical, accounting, economic and other analytical techniques and concepts to day-to-day military management issues. The graduate will be able to gather and analyze qualitative data. The graduate will also be able to use these techniques and concepts as a participant in the long-range strategic planning efforts of the Navy and DoD.
  5. Advanced Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis: The graduate will have the ability to apply a wide range of advanced organizational, economics, statistical, and mathematical techniques and concepts to manpower and personnel policies and issues. These include the use of econometric techniques in the quantitative analysis of large-scale DoN/DoD manpower and personnel databases, of qualitative techniques in the analysis of survey and personnel data, of manpower decision support systems, and of Markov models in the analysis of force structure and manpower planning, forecasting, and flow models.
  6. Manpower Systems Analysis Fundamental Concepts: The graduate will have an understanding of the fundamental concepts and basic functional areas of manpower, personnel, training, and education (MPT&E) within DoN/DoD as listed below, as well as an understanding of the MPT&E systems and their interrelationships.
    1. Manpower: Requirements determination; billet authorizations; billet costs; end strength planning; and total force planning and programming.
    2. Personnel: Recruiting; accession plans and policies; officer and enlisted community management; attrition; retention; compensation; and readiness.
    3. Training: Applications of theories of learning; instructional technologies; the systems approach to training; evaluation of training effectiveness and cost; and the relationship between training and fleet readiness.
  7. Manpower Systems Policy Analysis: The graduate will have the ability to analyze critically the strengths and weaknesses of proposed manpower, personnel, and training policies and to suggest alternatives that recognize the potential impact on DoN/DoD program planning, resources, and objectives.
  8. Joint Military Strategic Planning: The graduate will have an understanding of the development and execution of military strategy, the effects of technical developments on warfare, and the processes for formulating U.S. policy, the roles of military forces, joint planning, and current issues in the defense organization. This understanding will include expertise on the combined use of active and reserve forces in joint warfare.
  9. Evaluation, Innovation, and Creativity: The graduate will demonstrate individual initiative and creativity in the application of the skills and knowledge gained from the Manpower Systems Analysis program. The graduate will select a manpower, personnel, training, or education policy or management issue of importance to DoN/DoD, develop a plan to investigate the issue, analyze all of its aspects, suggest a solution as appropriate, and report the significant findings and recommendations in writing by means of a thesis.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Chief of Naval Operations (N14)

Executive Degree Programs

Program Officer

Jefferson E. McCollum, CDR, SC, USN

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 201

(831) 656-3953, DSN 756-3953

jemccoll@nps.edu

Executive Master of Business Administration (for Military students) - Curriculum 805

Academic Associate

William D. Hatch II, CDR, USN (Ret.)

Code GB/Hh, Ingersoll Hall, Room 339

(831) 656-2463, DSN 756-2463

whatch@nps.edu

Program Manager

William D. Hatch II, CDR, USN (Ret.)

Code GB/Hh, Ingersoll Hall, Room 339

(831) 656-2463, DSN 756-2463

whatch@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) is a defense-focused general management program for more senior DoN officers (805) and senior DoN civilians (see 807 curriculum). The program design and coursework capitalizes on the current managerial and leadership experience of program participants. Specifically, the EMBA goals are to provide participants with

The EMBA is a 24-month, part-time, distance learning degree program. Classes meet once a week, approximately 6-7 hours per day, depending on course units.

Requirements for Entry

The program has the following admissions criteria:

Undergraduate degree from an accredited four-year college or university

APC of 245 (GPA > 2.6)

Entry Dates

The 805 EMBA program entry dates are March and September (807 entry date is January).

Degree

Completion of this program results in an Executive Master of Business Administration degree. Requirements for the degree are met by:

Curriculum Subspecialty

Completion of the EMBA degree program qualifies an officer for subspecialty code 3100P, Resource Management-Defense Focus.

Curriculum Sponsor

Educational Skill Requirements Approval Authority: N8/N82

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 805

Orientation Week

GE3011

(2-0)

Management of Teams

Quarter 1

GE3109

(3-0)

Ethics and Moral Development

GE3050

(3-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

Quarter 2

GE3010

(3-0)

Organizations as Systems and Structures

GE3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

Quarter 3

GE3070

(3-0)

Economics for Defense Managers

GE3221

(3-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management I

Quarter 4

GE3222

(3-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management II

GE4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling and Analysis

Quarter 5

GE3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GE4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

Quarter 6

GE4480

(3-0)

Defense Supply Chain Management

GE4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

Quarter 7

GE3510

(3-0)

Defense Financial Management Practice

GE4016

(4-0)

Managing Strategic Change

Quarter 8

GE4101

(3-2)

Collaborative Problem Solving II

GE4102

(3-2)

Collaborative Problem Solving II

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Executive MBA - Curriculum

805 Subspecialty Code 3100P

  1. Business Ethics and Moral Development: The graduate will understand the ethical challenges of the global Defense business environment facing senior Navy corporate business leaders and resource managers, and develop the critical thinking and analytical skills required to address complex issues. In addition, the students will develop a personal approach to achieve ethical outcomes in the decision making process.
  2. Complex Systems Thinking: The graduate will be able to diagnose complex Navy and DoD problems from a systems perspective and offer solutions that maintain system alignments.
  3. Managing and Leading Complex Change: The graduate will understand the managerial and leadership levers required to institute and manage complex change and the implementation strategies necessary to ensure change initiatives reach all organizational levels.
  4. Strategic Thinking: The graduate will have knowledge of senior-level decision-making processes under conditions of significant uncertainty within the unique context of DoD organizations. In addition, students will learn how to implement these decisions, evaluate their effectiveness, and determine steps to take if desired outcomes aren't reached.
  5. Analysis for Efficiency and Effectiveness: The graduate will be able to use various statistical methods to solve complex and unstructured problems in which alternatives will be evaluated and selected based on cost and systems analysis factors. This includes the use of probability theory, decision models and decision analysis, decision trees, forecasting, and simulation to make decisions under conditions of uncertainty with competing objectives.
  6. Program Management Policies: The graduate will have an ability to execute Defense acquisition policies, strategies, plans and procedures; an understanding of the policy-making roles of various federal agencies of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the Government, particularly the Department of Defense (DoD), the General Accounting Office (GAO), congressional committees, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB); and an understanding of the strategies necessary to influence policy development and implementation.
  7. System Acquisition Process: The graduate will understand the theory of the systems acquisition process. This involves the major system life cycle process for requirements determination, research and development, funding and budgeting, procurement, systems engineering, test and evaluation, manufacturing and quality control, integrated logistics support, ownership and disposal; the interrelationship between reliability, maintainability and logistics support as an element of system effectiveness in Defense system/equipment design; and embedded weapon system software, particularly related to current policies and standards, software metrics, risk management, inspections, testing, integration, and post-deployment software support.
  8. Federal and Defense Budgeting: The graduate will understand the roles of the executive and legislative branches in setting Federal/Defense fiscal policy, allocating resources to national defense, budget formulation, negotiation, and execution strategies. In addition, the graduate will have knowledge of all aspects of the Federal, Defense, and Navy budget cycles including the Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution (PPBE) process with emphasis on budget formulation and execution of the budget authority provided by Congress in response to DoD budget requests, including an evaluation of the expected benefits to be derived under funded programs.
  9. Defense Financial Management: The graduate will understand how appropriated, revolving, and non-appropriated funds are to be managed in compliance with regulations of the Comptroller of the Navy and the federal government. Also, the graduate will understand and be able to review financial reports, ask pointed questions about budget execution against operating and financial plans, assess the quality of alternate plans based on analyses of an activity's financial performance, and determine the quality of recommendations regarding the reallocation or reprogramming of funds. The graduate will be familiar with federal and private sector financial reporting systems, standards, and practices.
  10. Cost Management and Analysis: The graduate will be able to understand and evaluate different costing systems encountered within Defense and Navy organizations and activities as well as those found in private sector organizations conducting business with the federal government. In addition to private sector cost management policies and practices, the graduate will understand cost accounting standards applicable to Federal organizations and to private sector suppliers of goods and service to the federal government.
  11. Defense Economics: The graduate will be able to apply the fundamental tools of micro- and macroeconomic theory to Defense management and resource allocation decisions. Additionally, the student will understand markets and their interactions with Defense acquisition and contracting processes, the national security implications of globalization, and efficiency in Defense decision making.
  12. Operations/Supply Chain Management: The graduate will understand the management of manufacturing and service operations and how Defense managers can effectively design and control operational processes to achieve world-class performance in these types of operations. The student will also have a knowledge of the use of strategic purchasing initiatives to derive a competitive advantage from Defense procurement and sourcing strategies to achieve increased efficiency and enhanced performance in the global Defense and commercial supply chain management environments.
  13. Evaluation, Innovation, and Creativity: The graduate will demonstrate innovation and creativity in developing solutions to complex financial, budgetary, personnel, program management, or acquisition issues in response to the business need of a senior naval client/stakeholder. This involves the ability to identify and evaluate problems or opportunities, team with others to conduct in-depth analysis, and recommend courses of action for the client to better execute assigned Navy responsibilities. The solutions will be given to the client in a formal presentation and a technical report.

Executive Master of Business Administration (for Civilian students) - Curriculum 807

Academic Associate

William D. Hatch II, CDR, USN (Ret.)

Code GB/Hh, Ingersoll Hall, Room 339

(831) 656-2463, DSN 756-2463

whatch@nps.edu

Program Manager

William D. Hatch II, CDR, USN (Ret.)

Code GB/Hh, Ingersoll Hall, Room 339

(831) 656-2463, DSN 756-2463

whatch@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Civilian Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) is a defense-focused general management program for more senior DoN civilians. The program design and coursework capitalizes on the current managerial and leadership experience of program participants. Specifically, the EMBA goals are to provide participants with

The Civilian EMBA is a 24-month, part-time, distance learning degree program. Classes meet once a week, approximately 6-8 hours per day, depending on course units.

Requirements for Entry

The program has the following admissions criteria:

Entry Dates

The Civilian EMBA program entry date is January.

Degree

Completion of this program results in an Executive Master of Business Administration degree. Requirements for the degree are met by:

Curriculum Subspecialty

n/a

Curriculum Sponsor

Educational Skill Requirements Approval Authority: N8/N82

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 807

Orientation Week

GE3011

(2-0)

Management of Teams

Quarter 1

GE3109

(3-0)

Ethics and Moral Development

GE3050

(3-0)

Financial Reporting and Analysis

Quarter 2

GE3010

(3-0)

Organizations as Systems and Structures

GE3051

(3-0)

Cost Management

Quarter 3

GE3070

(3-0)

Economics for Defense Managers

GE3221

(3-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management I

Quarter 4

GE3222

(3-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management II

GE4043

(3-0)

Business Modeling and Analysis

Quarter 5

GE3042

(4-0)

Operations Management

GE4052

(3-0)

Managerial Finance

Quarter 6

GE4460

(3-0)

Defense Supply Chain Management

GE4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

Quarter 7

GE3510

(3-0)

Defense Financial Management Practice

GE4016

(4-0)

Managing Strategic Change

Quarter 8

GE4100 (<GE4015 - GE4510 Courses>, http://www.)

(3-7)

Collaborative Problem Solving

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Civilian Executive MBA - Curriculum

  1. Business Ethics and Moral Development: The graduate will understand the ethical challenges of the global Defense business environment facing senior Navy corporate business leaders and resource managers, and develop the critical thinking and analytical skills required to address complex issues. In addition, the students will develop a personal approach to achieve ethical outcomes in the decision making process.
  2. Complex Systems Thinking: The graduate will be able to diagnose complex Navy and DoD problems from a systems perspective and offer solutions that maintain system alignments.
  3. Managing and Leading Complex Change: The graduate will understand the managerial and leadership levers required to institute and manage complex change and the implementation strategies necessary to ensure change initiatives reach all organizational levels.
  4. Strategic Thinking: The graduate will have knowledge of senior-level decision-making processes under conditions of significant uncertainty within the unique context of DoD organizations. In addition, students will learn how to implement these decisions, evaluate their effectiveness, and determine steps to take if desired outcomes aren't reached.
  5. Analysis for Efficiency and Effectiveness: The graduate will be able to use various statistical methods to solve complex and unstructured problems in which alternatives will be evaluated and selected based on cost and systems analysis factors. This includes the use of probability theory, decision models and decision analysis, decision trees, forecasting, and simulation to make decisions under conditions of uncertainty with competing objectives.
  6. Program Management Policies: The graduate will have an ability to execute Defense acquisition policies, strategies, plans and procedures; an understanding of the policy-making roles of various federal agencies of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the Government, particularly the Department of Defense (DoD), the General Accounting Office (GAO), congressional committees, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB); and an understanding of the strategies necessary to influence policy development and implementation.
  7. System Acquisition Process: The graduate will understand the theory of the systems acquisition process. This involves the major system life cycle process for requirements determination, research and development, funding and budgeting, procurement, systems engineering, test and evaluation, manufacturing and quality control, integrated logistics support, ownership and disposal; the interrelationship between reliability, maintainability and logistics support as an element of system effectiveness in Defense system/equipment design; and embedded weapon system software, particularly related to current policies and standards, software metrics, risk management, inspections, testing, integration, and post-deployment software support.
  8. Federal and Defense Budgeting: The graduate will understand the roles of the executive and legislative branches in setting Federal/Defense fiscal policy, allocating resources to national defense, budget formulation, negotiation, and execution strategies. In addition, the graduate will have knowledge of all aspects of the Federal, Defense, and Navy budget cycles including the Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution (PPBE) process with emphasis on budget formulation and execution of the budget authority provided by Congress in response to DoD budget requests, including an evaluation of the expected benefits to be derived under funded programs.
  9. Defense Financial Management: The graduate will understand how appropriated, revolving, and non-appropriated funds are to be managed in compliance with regulations of the Comptroller of the Navy and the federal government. Also, the graduate will understand and be able to review financial reports, ask pointed questions about budget execution against operating and financial plans, assess the quality of alternate plans based on analyses of an activity's financial performance, and determine the quality of recommendations regarding the reallocation or reprogramming of funds. The graduate will be familiar with federal and private sector financial reporting systems, standards, and practices.
  10. Cost Management and Analysis: The graduate will be able to understand and evaluate different costing systems encountered within Defense and Navy organizations and activities as well as those found in private sector organizations conducting business with the federal government. In addition to private sector cost management policies and practices, the graduate will understand cost accounting standards applicable to Federal organizations and to private sector suppliers of goods and service to the federal government.
  11. Defense Economics: The graduate will be able to apply the fundamental tools of micro- and macroeconomic theory to Defense management and resource allocation decisions. Additionally, the student will understand markets and their interactions with Defense acquisition and contracting processes, the national security implications of globalization, and efficiency in Defense decision making.
  12. Operations/Supply Chain Management: The graduate will understand the management of manufacturing and service operations and how Defense managers can effectively design and control operational processes to achieve world-class performance in these types of operations. The student will also have a knowledge of the use of strategic purchasing initiatives to derive a competitive advantage from Defense procurement and sourcing strategies to achieve increased efficiency and enhanced performance in the global Defense and commercial supply chain management environments.
  13. Evaluation, Innovation, and Creativity: The graduate will demonstrate innovation and creativity in developing solutions to complex financial, budgetary, personnel, program management, or acquisition issues in response to the business need of a senior naval client/stakeholder. This involves the ability to identify and evaluate problems or opportunities, team with others to conduct in-depth analysis, and recommend courses of action for the client to better execute assigned Navy responsibilities. The solutions will be given to the client in a formal presentation and a technical report.

Executive Degree Programs

Program Officer

Jefferson E. McCollum, CDR, SC, USN

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 201

(831) 656-3953, DSN 756-3953

jemccoll@nps.edu

Master of Science in Contract Management (DL) - Curriculum 835

Academic Associate

Richard Nalwasky, CDR, USN

Code GB/Yc, Ingersoll Hall, Room 244

(831) 656-2205

rnalwask@nps.edu

Program Manager

Walter E. Owen, D.P.A.

Code SE/Wo (located in St. Louis, MO)

(831) 402-6086 or (636) 925-2982

wowen@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Master of Science in Contract Management (MSCM) degree is designed to provide civilians in the Department of Defense (DoD) and other federal government agencies an advanced education in the concepts, methodologies and analytical techniques necessary for successful management of acquisition and contracting within complex organizations. The curriculum focuses on problem solving and decision making within the acquisition environment utilizing case studies, teaming exercises, hands-on applications, active participation, and other similar activities. Lecture and laboratory tasks require the application of critical thinking to problem solving within actual situations. The MSCM Program embodies an interdisciplinary approach to problem solving and analysis, including quantitative financial analysis, economics, and public and private sector operations. The curriculum is designed to provide civilians with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to manage and lead effectively in systems buying offices, field contracting offices, contract administration offices, and contracting policy offices.

Requirements for Entry

Candidates for the program must have achieved the following: a baccalaureate degree with a minimum undergraduate quality point rating (QPR) of 2.20.

Entry Dates

January, April, July, October. (Dependent on cohort availability)

Program Length

Eight Distance-Learning Quarters

Application Process

Navy Department civilians may apply for the MSCM by submitting an online application, and adhere to your service or agency application process. For further information, contact the Academic Associate for this curriculum or the Program Officer.

Degree

The Master of Science in Contract Management degree requires:

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 835

Quarter 1

MN3012

(3-0)

Communications Strategies for Effective Leadership

MN3221

(3-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management (part 1)

Quarter 2

MN3001

(3-0)

Economics for Acquisition Managers

MN3222

(3-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management (part 2)

Quarter 3

MN3312

(4-0)

Government Contracts Law

MN4474

(3-1)

Organizational Analysis

Quarter 4

MN3172

(3-0)

Resourcing National Security: Policy and Process

MN3315

(4-0)

Acquisition Management and Contract Administration

Quarter 5

MN3304

(5-2)

Contract Pricing and Negotiations

Quarter 6

MN3318

(2-0)

Contingency Contracting

MN4105

(3-0)

Strategic Management

Quarter 7

MN4311

(3-0)

Contracting for Services

MN4090

(2-0)

Joint Applied Project

Quarter 8

MN4371

(4-0)

Acquisition and Contracting Policy

MN4090

(2-0)

Joint Applied Project

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Contract Management - Curriculum 835

  1. Advanced Management Concepts: The graduate will have the ability to apply advanced management theory and techniques to problems in both the public and private sectors. This includes policy formulation and execution, strategic planning, resource allocation, federal fiscal policy, computer-based information and decision support systems, and complex managerial situations requiring comprehensive integrated approaches. The graduate will have the ability to apply state-of-the-art management concepts and practices to problem solving and decision-making responsibilities as middle and senior managers.
  2. Acquisition and Contracting Principles: The graduate will have an understanding of and will be able to apply the principles and fundamentals of acquisition and contracting within the federal government including knowledge of the acquisition laws and regulations, particularly the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the Defense FAR Supplement (DFARS); the unique legal principles applied in government contract law and the Uniform Commercial Code; and the application of sound business principles and practices to Defense contracting problems. Further, the graduate will be able to apply innovative and creative approaches not only to resolve difficult acquisition and contracting issues but to significantly influence the legal and regulatory structure within which acquisition decision making occurs. Finally, the graduate will have the ability to conceptualize, develop and execute strategic business alliances and relationships necessary to the successful acquisition of goods and services.
  3. Contracting Process: The graduate will understand the theory of and have the ability to manage the field contracting, system acquisition and contract administration processes. This involves  a knowledge of the defense system life cycle processes, including requirements determination, funding, contracting, ownership, and disposal; an ability to evaluate military requirements, specifications, and bids and proposals; an ability to utilize the sealed bid, competitive proposals and simplified acquisition methodologies; a comprehensive knowledge of all contract types and their application in Defense acquisition; an ability to conduct cost and price analyses; and an ability to negotiate various contracting actions including new procurement, contract changes and modifications, claims, equitable adjustment settlements, and noncompliance issues.
  4. Acquisition and Contracting Policy: The graduate will have an ability to formulate and execute acquisition policies, strategies, plans and procedures; a knowledge of the legislative process and an ability to research and analyze acquisition legislation; and a knowledge of the government organization for acquisition, including Congress, the General Accounting Office, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy, the federal and military contracting offices, the Boards of Contract Appeals, and the court system.
  5. Business Theory and Practices: The graduate will have an understanding of the business philosophy, concepts, practices and methodologies of the commercial industrial base (both domestic and global) and the ability to apply these to the federal government acquisition environment.
  6. Defense Financial Management and Budgeting: The graduate will have an ability to apply sound financial management theories, principles and practices to defense acquisition and contracting issues, including fiscal and monetary policy.
  7. Production and Quality Management: The graduate will have an understanding of principles and fundamentals of Production and Quality Management, with particular emphasis on the Procuring Contracting Officer's and Administrative Contracting Officer's roles and relationships with industry and the Government Program Manager.
  8. Analysis and Application: The graduate will demonstrate an ability to apply acquisition, contracting and management principles in dealing with the significant issues encountered in managing the contracting process in one of the following areas: (1) major weapon systems acquisition, (2) research and development, (3) field procurement, and (4) facilities contracting.
  9. Ethics and Standards of Conduct: The graduate will have an ability to manage and provide leadership in the ethical considerations of military acquisition, including the provisions of procurement integrity, and to appropriately apply Defense acquisition standards of conduct.
  10. Acquisition Work force: The graduate will satisfy all requirements of the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) and mandatory contracting courses required by the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) at Level III.
  11. Analysis, Problem Solving and Critical Thinking: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research and analysis, and proficiency in presenting the results in writing and orally by means of a thesis and a command-oriented briefing appropriate to this curriculum.

Master of Science in Program Management (MSPM) - Curriculum 836

Academic Associate

Brad R. Naegle

Code GB/Nb, Ingersoll Hall, Room 206

(831) 656-3620, DSN 756-3620

bnaegle@nps.edu

Program Manager

Walter E. Owen, D.P.A.

Code GB/On, Ingersoll Hall, Room 335

(831) 656-2048 or (636) 925-2982, DSN 756-2048

wowen@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Master of Science in Program Management (MSPM) degree is designed to provide primarily civilians (officers may participate with sufficient time on station to complete the program) in the Department of Defense (DoD), other federal agencies, and a limited number of DoD contractor personnel, an advanced education in the concepts, methodologies and analytical techniques necessary for successful management of programs/projects within complex organizations. The curriculum focuses on leadership, problem solving and decision making within the acquisition environment utilizing case studies, teaming exercises, hands-on applications, active participation and integrative exercises. Lecture and laboratory tasks require the application of critical thinking to problem solving within notional and actual situations. Student input includes civilians (officers) from all DoD services and other federal agencies. The curriculum is designed to provide graduates with the knowledge, skills and abilities to manage and lead effectively in the federal government acquisition environment.

Requirements for Entry

Candidates for the program must have achieved the following: a baccalaureate degree with a minimum undergraduate quality point rating (QPR) of 2.20; full certification at Level II or higher in any discipline under the provisions of the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) (or equivalent certification for non-DoD personnel).  In addition to institutional funding support, students must also provide a command endorsement letter of support from their command or home organization.

Entry Dates

April and October (dependent on sufficient demand)

Program Length

Eight Distance-Learning Quarters

Degree

The Master of Science in Program Management degree requires:

Curriculum Sponsor

The Curriculum Sponsor is the Director, Acquisition Career Management (DACM) in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology). The curriculum satisfies the mandatory Level III Defense Acquisition University (DAU) in Program Management and provides numerous other DAU certifications satisfying requirements of the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) and provides qualifying training and education for critical acquisition positions. (For those who have not already obtained certification in the Test & Evaluation; Systems Engineering; and Manufacturing/Production, Quality Assurance career fields, this program achieves Level II in these career fields, as well as satisfying Intermediate Software Acquisition Management (SAM 201)).

Typical Course of Study: Curriculum 836

Quarter 1

MN3001

(4-0)

Economics for Defense Managers

MN3302

(2-0)

Advanced Program Management

Quarter 2

MN3303

(4-0)

Principles of Acquisition and Contract Management

MN4602

(2-0)

Test and Evaluation Management

Quarter 3

MN3172

(3-0)

Resourcing National Security Policy and Process

SE4011

(3-2)

Systems Engineering for Acquisition Managers

Quarter 4

MN3309

(4-1)

Acquisition of Embedded Weapon Systems Software

MN3012

(3-0)

Communications Strategies for Effective Leadership

Quarter 5

 

 

 

MN3384

(4-1)

Principles of Acquisition Production & Quality Management

Quarter 6

MN4470

(4-0)

Strategic Planning & Policy for the Logistics Manager

MN4474

(2-0)

Organizational Analysis

MN4090

(0-6)

Joint Applied Project

Quarter 7

MN3155

(2-0)

Financial Management for Acquisition Managers

MN4105

(3-0)

Strategic Management

Quarter 8

MN4307

(4-0)

Program Management Policy and Control

MN4090

(0-6)

Joint Applied Project

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Program Management - Curriculum 836

  1. Management Fundamentals: The graduate will understand the theory of and have an ability to apply accounting, economic, mathematical, statistical, managerial and other state-of-the-art management techniques and concepts to problem solving and decision-making responsibilities as Department of Defense managers. The graduate will have the ability to think creatively, addressing issues and problems in a dynamic, challenging environment.
  2. Advanced Leadership and Management Concepts: The graduate will have the ability to apply advanced leadership, management and operations research techniques to defense problems. This includes policy formulation and execution, strategic planning, defense resource allocation, project leadership, cost benefit and cost effectiveness analysis, federal fiscal policy, computer-based information and decision support systems, and complex managerial situations requiring comprehensive integrated leadership abilities.
  3. Program Leadership and Management Principles: The graduate will have an understanding of and will be able to apply the principles, concepts, and techniques of Program Leadership and Program Management to the acquisition of major defense weapon systems. This includes the principles of risk management and tradeoff decision analysis using Total Ownership Cost, schedule and performance dynamics from a total life cycle management perspective.
  4. Program Management Policies: The graduate will have an ability to formulate and execute Defense acquisition policies, strategies, plans and procedures; an understanding of the policy-making roles of various federal agencies of the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of the Government, particularly the Department of Defense (DoD), the General Accounting Office (GAO), Congressional committees, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB); and an understanding of the strategies necessary to influence policy development and implementation.
  5. Systems Acquisition Process: The graduate will understand the theory of and have an ability to lead program teams and manage the systems acquisition process. This involves the system life cycle process for requirements determination, research and development, funding and budgeting, procurement, systems engineering, including systems of systems, test and evaluation, manufacturing and quality control, integrated logistics support, ownership and disposal; the interrelationship between reliability, maintainability and logistics support as an element of system effectiveness in Defense system/equipment design; and embedded weapon system software, particularly related to current policies and standards, software metrics, risk management, inspections, testing, integration, and post-deployment software support.
  6. Contract Management: The graduate will understand the role of the contracting process within the acquisition environment including financial, legal, statutory, technical and managerial constraints in the process.
  7. Business Theory and Practices: The graduate will have an understanding of the business and operating philosophies, concepts, practices and methodologies of the defense industry with regard to major weapon systems acquisition, particularly the application of sound business practices.
  8. Government and Industry Budgeting and Financial Management: The graduate will have an understanding of and an ability to apply the principles of government and private organizational financing including corporate financial structures, cost and financial accounting, capital budgeting techniques, financial analysis, and Defense financial management and budgeting processes to include the Planning, Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES).
  9. Acquisition Workforce: The graduate will satisfy all requirements of the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) and mandatory Program Management courses required by the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) at Levels I, II, and III.
  10. Ethics and Standards of Conduct: The graduate will have an ability to manage and provide leadership in the ethical considerations of defense acquisition, including the provisions of procurement integrity, and to appropriately apply defense acquisition standards of conduct.
  11. Analysis, Problem Solving and Critical Thinking: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct research and analysis, and proficiency in presenting the results in writing and orally by means of an applied project and a command-oriented briefing appropriate to this curriculum.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

836 U. S. Army ASA/ALT (DDACM)

Non-Degree Professional Development Programs

The Graduate School of Business and Public Policy also administers several non-degree professional development programs consisting of both graduate education and professional courses taught in residence or via distance learning modes. Below is a brief explanation of each program.

Advanced Acquisition Program (AAP) - Certificate in Program Management - Curriculum 211

Program Manager

John T. Dillard

Code GB/Dj, Ingersoll Hall, Room 336

(831) 656-2650, DSN 756-2650

jtdillar@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Advanced Acquisition Program (AAP) is a 12-month, part-time, distance learning graduate certificate program that can also earn graduate credit toward NPS master's degree programs. Designed for both the DoD acquisition workforce and other professionals working with system acquisition and program management processes, the Advanced Acquisition Program provides a flexible, on-site alternative for education and Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) Program Management Level III certification. The AAP provides Acquisition Professionals and those associated with the DoD acquisition process an education resource for achieving DAWIA Level III Certification in Program Management with no student travel. This program is funded by the student's parent command, and is designed to accommodate professionals who are unable to travel away from the office for weeks of education. Schedules are coordinated with sponsoring commands, avoiding conflicts with major projects and deadlines

The AAP is a three-phased graduate certificate program of seven courses delivered over four NPS academic quarters. While the three phases must be completed in sequence, there is no requirement to complete them in the normal one-year timeframe (four academic quarters). AAP is a graduate-level program of in-depth acquisition and program management education, earning successful students 19.5 graduate credit hours towards a master's degree. It also provides DoD students with up to 195 hours of Continuous Learning under the USD (AT&L) Continuous Learning Program (CLP), 31.5 Continuing Education Units (CEU), 6.33 Business Credits toward the requirement for 24 for the GS-1102 series. The combined courses are equivalent to Defense Acquisition University's ACQ101, ACQ201, PMT250 and PMT352.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is desired.

Entry Dates

At the beginning of any quarter throughout an academic year (Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct).

Program Length

Four Quarters

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the graduate certificate in program management are met by successful completion of all seven courses. Graduate credit is obtained by maintenance of a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Should a graduate of the Advanced Acquisition Program matriculate into the Master of Business Administration degree program in the Systems Acquisition Management (816) curriculum, or the Master of Science in Program Management (836), graduate credit for AAP courses will be applied to the curricula as appropriate.

Past Sponsors

U.S. Army Tank Automotive Command, Warren, MI; U.S. Army Soldier Support Center, Natick, MA; U.S. Navy Undersea Warfare Center, Newport, RI; U.S. Navy Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, VA.

Program Phases

The program is administered with a phased approach:

Required Courses: Curriculum 211

Quarter 1

MN3331

(5-1)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management

Quarter 2 and 3

MN3361

(2-0)

Information Technology and Software Acquisition Management

MN3362

(2-0)

Design Verification and System Assessment

MN3363

(2-0)

Manufacturing and Quality Management

MN3364

(2-0)

Business Financial Contract and Management

MN3365

(2-0)

Acquisition Logistics Management and Program Sustainment

Quarter 4

MN4366

(4-0)

Program Management and Leadership

Acquisition Management Distance Learning Program (AMDLP) - Curriculum 212

Program Manager

Walter E. Owen, D.P.A.

Code GB/On, Ingersoll Hall, Room 335

(831) 656-2048 or (636) 925-2982, DSN 756-2048

wowen@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Naval Postgraduate School offers acquisition management distance education graduate acquisition courses that satisfy certain Defense Acquisition University (DAU) mandatory training requirements and Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) requirements for 24 semester-hours of business subjects. These courses can also be taken for continuing education that can lead to a master's degree program. These courses are offered primarily by video tele-education (VTE) distance learning methods.

Requirements for Entry

Courses are offered to both military and federal civilians. Undergraduate degree is preferred. Courses must be sponsored in full by a federal organization. Organizations interested in sponsoring courses must have a standards-based H.320- compatible system with a dial-up network capability at 384KPS (3- ISDN lines). The NPS AMDLP program manager can help arrange cost sharing partnerships between various interested organizations. Contact the AMDLP program manager for more information and the latest price list.

Available Program of Courses

NPS/DAU equivalent courses are listed in the below matrix.

Advanced Principles of Defense Acquisition and Program Management

DAU: ACQ101/201, PMT250

NPS: MN3331 (5-1)

Available: Every quarter

Fundamental Principles of Defense Acquisition and Program Management

DAU: ACQ101

NPS: MN3221 (2-1)

Available: Every quarter

Advanced Principles of Defense Acquisition and Program Management

DAU: ACQ201/PMT250

NPS: MN3222 (3-0)

Available: Every quarter

Fundamental Principles of Government Acquisition and Contracting

DAU: CON101

NPS: MN3303 (4-0)

Available: Fall/Spring

Management Functions and Decision-making Techniques for Best Value Competitively Negotiated Contracts

DAU: CON202

NPS: MN3315 (4-0)

Available: Fall/Spring

Examination of the Federal Government Legal Structure for Contracts with Private Industry

DAU: CON210

NPS: MN3312 (4-1)

Available: Winter/Summer

Concepts, Processes and Methods of Strategic Logistics Planning and Execution

DAU: LOG304

NPS: MN4470 (4-0)

Available: Winter/Summer

Principles and Concepts of Production and Quality Management in Defense Acquisition

DAU: PQM101/201

NPS: MN3384 (4-1)

Available: Fall/Spring

Management of Mission Critical Computer Resources In defense Software Acquisition

DAU: SAM201

NPS: MN3309 (4-0)

Available: Winter/Summer

Systems Engineering in the Defense Acquisition and Project Management Environment

DAU: SYS201

NPS: SE4011 (3-2)

Available: Fall/Spring

Management of Advanced Systems Engineering

DAU: SYS301

NPS: MN4012 (2-2)

Available: Every Quarter

Test and Evaluation of Defense Weapon Systems

DAU: TST202/301

NPS: OS4601 (4-0)

Available: Winter/Summer

Army Cost Management Certificate (Resident NPS Program) - Curriculum 213

Program Manager

Teresa (Terry) Rea

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 231A

(831) 656-7962, DSN

tmrea@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Naval Postgraduate School offers this four-week resident graduate education program to prepare students to support improved cost measurement, management, and control efforts. The program of instruction provides 12 units of credit that may be applicable to further education programs.

Requirements for Entry

Courses are offered to selected Army military and civilians. Undergraduate degree is required.

For further information go to www.us.army.mil or contact Cecile Bachelor, Special Assistant for Enterprise Cost Strategy, Office of Deputy Assistant, Secretary of the Army for Cost & Economics, at (703) 692-7399  [DSN: 222-7399] or cecile.bachelor@us.army.mil.

Entry Dates

Ongoing basis.

Program Length

Four weeks.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Completion of the following four courses.

MN3352 Managerial Costing

Content: Cost measurement concepts and techniques of cost analysis

Description: This course will explore the development and use of cost information by managers. Its focus will be on management applications and analyses rather than on bookkeeping techniques and methodologies. The course will examine accounting measurements and analyses that provide relevant information for management decision-making, operational control, and productivity improvement. These internally-oriented processes are fundamentally different from those used to comply with external financial accounting requirements. The primary objectives of the course are as follows: reinforce skills in reporting and analyzing managerial accounting information; develop experience in analyzing this information from the perspective of its various users, especially management; develop the ability to identify and communicate relevant managerial accounting information; and develop an appreciation of the usefulness and limitations of managerial accounting information. Prerequisite: Department of Army approval for enrollment.

Available: Winter and Summer quarters.

MN3353 Operations Management

Content: Fundamentals of design, management, and control of operational processes

Description: This course is about the fundamentals of managing manufacturing and service operations and about how DoD managers can effectively design and control operational processes. Helping students understand the concepts and techniques necessary for attaining a world-class performance in manufacturing and service operations is the main learning objective of this course. Analyzing and continuously improving enterprise-wide processes is critically important for achieving such a performance and hence the course will adopt a "process management" viewpoint while addressing a variety of operational and strategic issues. The course begins by introducing the operations function and its "mission" in terms of cost, quality, speed, service, and flexibility. Several exercises and cases are used here to illustrate the concepts fundamental to process analysis, including capacity, bottleneck, cycle time, and inventory, and their implications to cost management. The book by Goldratt, The Goal, is also discussed to provide a real-world context to the variety of issues addressed in the course, and to introduce the Theory of Constraints (TOC). At this point the course will cover the topics of capacity planning, inventory management, MRP/ERP and project management. The course will end with an introduction to supply chain management, a topic integrating a number of concepts covered earlier in the course. Prerequisite: MN3352.

Available: Winter and Summer quarters.

MN4354 Cost Control

Content: Control theory, practical examples of cost control issues and solutions including cost benefit analysis and case studies

Description: Provides an understanding of management control, management control structures and processes and how they are designed to control costs while also organizing work processes and motivating employees to work productively. Course objectives are understanding of (i) management control principles and processes, (ii) the application of cost management principles and processes, (iii) defense management control process events and timing, (iv) cost control and accounting data independence, (v) application of case study method to study of management control and cost management, (vi) cost control dynamics in budget execution, (vii) management and cost control reform initiatives and (viii) contemporary defense cost and resource policy issues. Prerequisite: MN3353.

Available: Winter and Summer.

MN3355 Organizational Effectiveness for Cost Managers

Content: Systems thinking, interpersonal communication, listening, motivation, leadership, message framing, decision making, persuasion, power and social influence, and negotiations

Description: This course teaches students to analyze, understand, and influence the organizations with which they work. To do this, the course introduces psychological, behavioral and communication principles that can be applied in organizations, with a focus on the introduction and maintenance of cost management programs. Throughout this course, we develop leadership skills and communication competencies, identify ways to increase individuals' and groups' performance, and practice organizational analysis and problem solving. As a crucial component of this process, we also explore social influence principles to work more effectively with individuals and groups. The course combines theoretical and practical knowledge to prepare students for situations that commonly arise and give them the tools to deal with unexpected or unusual real world situations. Assignments and projects focus on applying organizational principles to cost management in the Dept. of Defense. Prerequisites: MN4354.

Available: Spring and Fall.

Army Cost Management Certificate (DL) - Curriculum 214

Program Manager

Teresa (Terry) Rea

Code GB, Ingersoll Hall, Room 231A

(831) 656-7962, DSN

tmrea@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Naval Postgraduate School offers this four-course distance learning graduate education program to prepare students to support improved cost measurement, management, and control efforts. The program of instruction is completed in two academic quarters and provides 12 units of credit that may be applicable to further education programs.

Requirements for Entry

Courses are offered to selected Army military and civilians. Undergraduate degree is required.

For further information go to www.us.army.mil or contact Mr. Peter Kim, Special Assistant for Enterprise Cost Strategy, Office of Deputy Assistant, Secretary of the Army for Cost & Economics (DASA-CE).

(703) 692-7399  [DSN: 222-7399]; peter.s.kim@us.army.mil

Entry Dates

Ongoing basis.

Program Length

Two quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Completion of the following four courses.

MN3352 Managerial Costing

Content: Cost measurement concepts and techniques of cost analysis

Description: This course will explore the development and use of cost information by managers. Its focus will be on management applications and analyses rather than on bookkeeping techniques and methodologies. The course will examine accounting measurements and analyses that provide relevant information for management decision-making, operational control, and productivity improvement. These internally-oriented processes are fundamentally different from those used to comply with external financial accounting requirements. The primary objectives of the course are as follows: reinforce skills in reporting and analyzing managerial accounting information; develop experience in analyzing this information from the perspective of its various users, especially management; develop the ability to identify and communicate relevant managerial accounting information; and develop an appreciation of the usefulness and limitations of managerial accounting information. Prerequisite: Department of Army approval for enrollment.

Available: Per sponsor requirements.

MN3353 Operations Management

Content: Fundamentals of design, management, and control of operational processes

Description: This course is about the fundamentals of managing manufacturing and service operations and about how DoD managers can effectively design and control operational processes. Helping students understand the concepts and techniques necessary for attaining a world-class performance in manufacturing and service operations is the main learning objective of this course. Analyzing and continuously improving enterprise-wide processes is critically important for achieving such a performance and hence the course will adopt a "process management" viewpoint while addressing a variety of operational and strategic issues. The course begins by introducing the operations function and its "mission" in terms of cost, quality, speed, service, and flexibility. Several exercises and cases are used here to illustrate the concepts fundamental to process analysis, including capacity, bottleneck, cycle time, and inventory, and their implications to cost management. The book by Goldratt, The Goal, is also discussed to provide a real-world context to the variety of issues addressed in the course, and to introduce the Theory of Constraints (TOC). At this point the course will cover the topics of capacity planning, inventory management, MRP/ERP and project management. The course will end with an introduction to supply chain management, a topic integrating a number of concepts covered earlier in the course. Prerequisite: MN3352.

Available: Per sponsor requirements.

MN4354 Financial Analysis and Cost Management

Content: Control theory, practical examples of cost control issues and solutions including cost benefit analysis and case studies

Description: Provides an understanding of management control, management control structures and processes and how they are designed to control costs while also organizing work processes and motivating employees to work productively. Course objectives are understanding of (i) management control principles and processes, (ii) the application of cost management principles and processes, (iii) defense management control process events and timing, (iv) cost control and accounting data independence, (v) application of case study method to study of management control and cost management, (vi) cost control dynamics in budget execution, (vii) management and cost control reform initiatives and (viii) contemporary defense cost and resource policy issues. Prerequisite: MN3353.

Available: Per sponsor requirements.

MN3355 Organizational Effectiveness for Cost Managers

Content: Systems thinking, interpersonal communication, listening, motivation, leadership, message framing, decision making, persuasion, power and social influence, and negotiations

Description: This course teaches students to analyze, understand, and influence the organizations with which they work. To do this, the course introduces psychological, behavioral and communication principles that can be applied in organizations, with a focus on the introduction and maintenance of cost management programs. Throughout this course, we develop leadership skills and communication competencies, identify ways to increase individuals' and groups' performance, and practice organizational analysis and problem solving. As a crucial component of this process, we also explore social influence principles to work more effectively with individuals and groups. The course combines theoretical and practical knowledge to prepare students for situations that commonly arise and give them the tools to deal with unexpected or unusual real world situations. Assignments and projects focus on applying organizational principles to cost management in the Dept. of Defense. Prerequisites: MN4354.

Available: Per sponsor requirements.

GSBPP Courses

GB Courses (MBA Program)

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<GB1000 - GB3510 Courses>

GB1000 Quantitative Skills for Graduate Management Studies (0-3) Winter/Summer

This course is intended to help prepare students for graduate studies in defense management. It is administered online in three modules: quantitative skills, statistics and spreadsheets. The objective is to reduce your difficulties with quantitative tools in your core courses, and allow you to focus on subsequent course materials.

GB2000 MBA Group Meetings (0-2) Winter/Summer

GB3010 Managing for Organizational Effectiveness(4-0) Winter/Summer

Organizations, including defense organizations, are complex, purposive, open systems. As open systems, they face challenges of external adaptation and effectiveness and of internal coherence and efficiency. Our purpose is to understand the structures and processes that make up organizations in order to appreciate how they succeed and why they falter or fail. Our focus is on organizational diagnosis, which requires us to apply relevant theories to evaluate organizational performance. To do this, we will examine topics that include: organizational structure, motivation and reward systems, organizational culture, power and conflict, effective teams, and the leadership characteristics involved in effectively managing today's organizations. Although these topics are relevant to all organizations, we will pay special attention to their application in the context of the DoD and military organizations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in GSBPP Degree Program.

GB3012 Communication for Managers (3-0) Winter/Summer

This course provides DoD and international military officers and civilians with the communication strategies and skills to manage and lead in the dynamic DoD environment. Instruction focuses on assessing various communication models, making strategic media choices, writing effective informative documents, developing associates' communication competencies through various feedback roles, and giving lucid briefings. Prerequisite: GB3010; Open to MBA students, or by consent of instructor.

GB3013 Problem Analysis & Ethical Dilemmas (0-2) Winter/Summer

The objective of the Problem Analysis and Ethical Dilemma (PAED) seminar is to provide an introduction to applied analytic decision making involving complex issues and applied ethical dilemmas in a wide variety of seemingly chaotic situations. Problem analysis and ethical dilemmas are two topics that are relevant in a variety of organizational settings. Thus, an essential part of a professional's education is the identification of issues, the analysis among alternatives, consideration of the implications and consequences of alternatives, and making a decision that confronts the specific issue at hand, is timely, and ethical. Analysis of problems is a vital competence for leaders in arriving at a decision that may affect their command, the local environment, and even the course of future events. Ethical dilemmas are those unclear situations that seem to have a series of diverse, chaotic variables and where having the facts is not enough. Facts may not take in values, rightness, culture, moral up-bringing, or even religious convictions. This seminar provides an orientation to the process of awareness, identification, contemplation and reflection, consideration of alternative actions, and decision making when presented with an unclear situation. Prerequisite: Open to MBA students, or by consent of instructor.

GB3014 Ethics for Public Managers (1-0) Winter/Summer

An introduction to problem analysis and moral reasoning in the context of business, commerce, and government service. Ethics is distinguished from routine requirements of legal compliance by emphasizing how classical forms of moral reasoning (such as utilitarianism, and the ethics of duty) can address and help resolve practical problems and case studies drawn from recent practice about which the law itself is largely silent. Free enterprise conceptions of profit-making are compared with government and public service conceptions of acquisition and contracting. Enrollment limited to 30 students per course section. Written assignments and final exam required. Five weeks of instruction (10 hours: 1-0). Prerequisite: none.

GB3020 Fundamentals of Information Technology (3-0) Winter/Summer

Successful organizations in today's Information Age are more dependent than ever on information technology (IT). This course provides business students and other non-IT majors a broad overview of computer technology, information systems, database/knowledge management, networks and information security. The course focuses on IT as a tool to support business processes throughout an organization, regardless of functional specialty. The study of principles and theory is combined with hands-on laboratory exercises to improve both IT literacy and competency. The knowledge and skills acquired will make the students more effective IT users and help them recognize opportunities where the application of IT solutions can provide a strategic advantage. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the MBA Degree Program; Open to MBA students, or by consent of instructor.

GB3030 Marketing Management (3-0) Fall/Spring

Focuses on managerial skills, tools and concepts required to produce a mutually satisfying exchange between consumers/users/ organizations and providers of goods, services and ideas. Emphasis on understanding the marketplace, individual parts of the marketing program (product, pricing, distribution and communication), and strategic formulation (orientation, target segmentation, positioning). Prerequisite: Enrollment in the MBA Degree Program; Open to MBA students, or by consent of instructor.

GB3031 Acquisition Management for International Students (3-0) Fall/Spring

This is the MBA core acquisition course for MBA international students in non-acquisition curricula. It introduces principles of public procurement management by examining acquisition policy issues, management strategies, contracting decisions, and contract management processes. Major international procurement models and systems will be introduced, including the US Federal Acquisition Regulation, Transparency International's Integrity Pacts, the UN Model Law on Procurement, the EU Public and Defense Procurement Directives, the World Bank Procurement and Integrity Guidelines, and the World Trade Organization Agreement on Government Procurement. Concepts, strategies and tools for planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling acquisition programs are examined. Acquisition topical areas include: anti-corruption measures, acquisition planning, the competition requirements, source selection, risk management, quality assurance, protests, transparency and publicity mechanisms, research and development, and contracting management. While the US defense acquisition system may be examined for comparative purposes, the major emphasis through case studies and readings is on international perspectives and issues. Another major emphasis of the course is on Foreign Military Sales (FMS) and the application of international procurement law concepts to the FMS process. Prerequisite: None.

GB3040 Managerial Statistics (4-0) Fall/Spring

GB3040 is an introduction to the science and art of converting data into information for managerial and policy analysis. This course focuses on the descriptive and inferential statistical concepts useful for conducting basic managerial and policy analysis. Topics include measurement scales, descriptive statistics for quantitative and qualitative data, basic probability concepts and distributions, sampling theory and sample design, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests, contingency table tests, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis. Excel statistical tools will be utilized for data analysis and presentation. Follow-on courses in GSBPP will build on the statistical foundations in GB3040. Prerequisites: College algebra and knowledge of Excel. Open to MBA students, or by consent of instructor.

GB3041 Analytical Tools for Managerial Decisions (4-0) Fall/Spring

GB3041 continues the development and understanding of the analytical process and the role of analysis in business. Building on skills from GB3040, students will expand their ability to formulate problems and identify solution methods. Topics and tools covered in GB3041 include sampling theory and sampling design strategies, survey methods, observational studies and experimentation, measurement scales, process quality control, time series smoothing methods, probabilistic and risk analysis, assessing the implications of modeling assumptions, and presenting analyses in clear, comprehensive and convincing format. Prerequisite: GB3040.

GB3042 Operations Management (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course provides an overview of operations in military and commercial systems. The course has three sections: (1) Creating processes, including a survey of process types, capacity planning, and service system design; (2) Controlling processes, including MRP/ERP systems and the role of information; and (3) Coordinating processes, including inventory management, purchasing, and supply chain management. Prerequisite: None.

GB3050 Financial Reporting and Analysis (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course covers theory, concepts, and practices underlying financial Accounting and Financial Reporting. The conceptual structure underlying the reporting of economic events in the form of the balance sheet, the income statement, and the statement of cash flows is first presented. Accounting recognition and measurement issues surrounding revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and equity are introduced and analyzed. Finally, different forms of financial analysis based on financial report information are addressed. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the manager or user perspective. Attention is given to the federal government financial reporting model and standards. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the GSBPP Degree Program.

GB3051 Cost Management (3-0) Fall/Spring (DL)

This course introduces students to cost management concepts and theories which are used by managers to make decisions on the allocation of financial, physical, and human resources to achieve strategic as well as short-term organizational goals and objectives and evaluate performance using financial and non-financial measures. The course is designed for those having a prior course in financial reporting and analysis or financial accounting. Cost management includes traditional tools and techniques such as cost behavior for decision making, activity costing, cost allocation, and standard costing. Prerequisite: GB3050.

GB3070 Economics of The Global Defense Environment (4-0) Winter/Summer (DL)

This course develops the fundamental tools of microeconomics and macroeconomics, and applies them to defense management and resource allocation. The course centers on defense applications of economic theory. Topics covered include: defense and the macro economy; markets and their interactions with defense acquisition and contracting; national security implications of globalization; and efficiency in defense decision making. Prerequisite: MA2XXX College algebra or equivalent.

GB3510 Defense Financial Management Practice (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course is designed for MBA students and presumes the student has a foundation including the PPBE system and Congressional Authorization and Appropriation processes. This course concentrates on financial management practices within DoD as distinct from policy and budgeting theory. The course covers the actors and activities and mechanics of building and defending budgets. It covers funding mechanisms for programs and activities, addressing the proper use and management of appropriated, reimbursable, and revolving funds. Basic principles of fiscal law are explored. It then addresses financial management and stewardship topics including budgetary accounting, management of cost drivers, the relationship between comptrollership and contracting, and internal controls. Contemporary financial management issues are discussed. Exercises and case studies are used to develop the students' ability to apply financial management concepts to real life situations. Prerequisite: GB4053 or permission of the instructor.

<GB4014 - GB4490 Courses>

GB4014 Strategic Management (4-0) Fall/Spring

Strategic Management entails the establishment of an organization's direction and the implementation and evaluation of that direction in view of the organization's external environment and its internal capabilities. The principal aim of this course is the transfer and adaptation of the principles of business strategic management to the Department of Defense and other government agencies. In previous courses, students concentrated on the functional elements of management (e.g., accounting, finance, acquisition, logistics, contracting, etc.). This course addresses the challenges of setting direction and implementing strategies for the total system or whole organization. Cases and approaches from the public and private sectors enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities to strategically think, plan, and manage. Prerequisite: GB3010, GB3012.

GB4015 Management of Change (3-0) Winter/Summer

This course recognizes and describes the dilemmas inherent in any effort to change a human system. Emphasis is placed on strategies and technologies for planning, managing, and implementing change. The course emphasizes approaches to planning and managing change that reflect the complexity of organizations comprised of several interdependent systems--technology, structure, task, culture, and people. The course is application-oriented and intended to enhance skill development. Prerequisite: GB4014.

GB4021 Strategic Management of IT (3-0) Spring/Fall

The management of Information Technology (IT) within the government and corporate environments has become a function that is shifting from the traditional IT management structure to the General Manager. In today's environment, it is imperative to understand the importance of and unique issues related to technology. Network Centric Warfare has been deemed mission critical to the success of the military now and in the future. This course provides the student with a general understanding of the key components and underlying concepts related to the valuation of technology within organizations. Topics include e-business, e-government, strategic outsourcing, software make vs. buy decisions, business process, re-engineering with technology, and the impacts of technology on force transformation. The course is not intended to be focused on the technical aspects of technology, but rather on the impact of technology on the manner in which DoD organizations function. Prerequisite: GB3020 or consent of instructor.

GB4043 Business Modeling and Analysis (3-0) Winter/Summer

This course introduces mathematical modeling for a sound conceptual understanding of the decision-making process. This course familiarizes the students with applications, assumptions, and limitations of the quantitative methods in modeling. It focuses on the development of mathematical and spreadsheet models, the verification of those models, sensitivity analysis of the solutions generated from a model, and the implementation of those solutions. Some of the topics covered include linear programming, non-linear and integer programming, simulation, and forecasting. The process of modeling and particular modeling tools are applied to business problems in finance, acquisition, logistics and manpower planning. Prerequisite: GB3040 and GB4071.

GB4044 Defense-Focused Managerial Inquiry (3-0) Fall/Spring

Fundamentally, this is a course in thinking critically and analytically. It is also a unique, practical opportunity for students to develop a research question, methodology, and proposal for their MBA project or master's thesis. Indeed, many students can expect to complete the initial stages of their MBA project or thesis by fulfilling the course requirement for a team-based research report. As Cooper and Schindler write: “Research is any organized inquiry carried out to provide information for solving problems. Business research is a systematic inquiry that provides information to guide business decisions. This includes reporting, descriptive, explanatory, and predictive studies. The managers of tomorrow will need to know more than any managers in history. Research will be a major contributor to that knowledge. Managers will find knowledge of research methods to be of value in many situations. They may need to conduct research either for themselves or for others. As buyers of research services, they will need to be able to judge research quality. Finally, they may become research specialists themselves.” Punch prefers to describe research as “organized common sense,” since it “supports the idea that good research is within the grasp of many people.” In this way, we can “simplify the more technical aspects of research methods, and enhance understanding, by showing the logic behind them.” This course similarly seeks to examine the logic of research methods--recognizing that these methods may differ across disciplines and subspecialties--rather than focus on detailed models or procedures that may hold little meaning for the military's managers. It is not a course in rules or required steps; rather, it is a course in understanding the principles, concepts, and range of techniques that define the craft of research. Prerequisite: None.

GB4052 Managerial Finance (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts and principles of financial management in the private sector and its implication on government contracting. It is designed to provide insights into the financial decision- making process encountered by commercial enterprises. The major emphasis is on financial environment, risk and return analysis, valuation models, cost of capital determination, optimal capital structure, and short-term and long-term financing. Prerequisite: GB3050.

GB4053 Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course analyzes the resource requirements process within the Department of Defense (DoD) and in the executive and legislative branches of the federal government. It begins with a summary of the current threat situation and potential changes to it. Once the threat is defined, the study of the resource allocation process to meet the threat begins. The course covers the resource planning and budgeting processes of the Department of the Navy, DoD and the federal government. It includes the politics of executive and congressional budgeting, and DoD budget and financial management processes and procedures including budget formulation and execution. It also includes analysis of the Planning, Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES) used by DoD to plan, budget and implement national defense resource management policy and programs. Other areas included are budget process and fiscal policy reform and the dynamics of internal DoD competition for resources. Executive and congressional budget processes are assessed to indicate how national security policy is resourced and implemented through the budget process. Spending for national security policy is tracked from budget submission through resolution, authorization and appropriation. Budget formulation, negotiation, and execution strategies are evaluated to indicate the dynamics of executive-legislative competition over resource allocation priorities. Supplemental appropriation patterns and current year budget execution patterns and problems are also considered. Prerequisite: GB3010 and GB3070, or GB4070.

GB4070 Energy Economics (4-0) Spring

This is an applied economics course in which microeconomic analysis will be applied to energy-related phenomena. The course begins with an introduction to basic microeconomic theories and tools, including the forces driving supply, demand, and market equilibrium. With these tools, the student will explore the fundamental issues surrounding the economics of energy production and use, and how government intervention, both at the domestic level and at the international level, influences energy markets. Specific attention is paid to the ways in which energy is similar and dissimilar to other goods and services that are traded in the economy. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on the practical application of economic theories and concepts to important public policy issues. The defense department is the largest consumer of energy in the federal government, and this course will equip students to be better stewards of energy resources. Prerequisites: None.

GB4071 Economic Analysis and Defense Resource Allocation (4-0) Fall/Spring

Develops the tools and techniques of economic efficiency to assist public sector decision makers in analyzing resource allocation in government activities. Focuses on developing the principles of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA). Stresses the application of CBA and CEA to specific investment projects, programs and policies in the federal government, especially in the Department of Defense. Prerequisites: GB3070 or GB4070.

GB4090 MBA Project (0-6) Winter/Summer

MBA Project. Prerequisite: Open to MBA students, or by consent of instructor.

GB4210 Knowing Management (3-0) Fall/Spring

Online course. This elective course on knowing management integrates theory with practice to help prepare current and future leaders to manage knowledge and lead knowers in learning organizations. Knowing refers to knowledge in action, and is concerned with activities (e.g., decision, behaviors, work) in the organization. Using emerging knowledge-flow theory as its intellectual base, the theoretical part of the course helps professionals understand how knowledge is both critical and unique, and equips them to design effective knowledge management (KM) programs around knowledge flows. Using real-time cases for group critique, the problem-based learning part of the course examines a diverse set of KM programs in operation today, and offers both principles for and experience in identifying strengths and weaknesses. Students also select new or operational KM programs for evaluation, and work individually as consultants to assess and redesign them based on knowledge flows. This asynchronous (e.g., Web-based) course offers opportunities for cutting-edge graduate education beyond the classroom. Prerequisites: GB3020, IS3301, IS3302 or by consent of instructor.

GB4410 Logistics Engineering (4-0) Winter/Summer

The concept of integrated logistics support in the design and maintenance of weapon systems. Operational requirements, reliability, system maintenance concept, functional analysis, life cycle costs, logistics support analysis, systems design, test and evaluation, production, spare/repair parts management are discussed. This course also covers topics in logistics information technology, inventory management culture and commercial-sector best practices for military. Case studies include logistics life-cycle cost, reliability and readiness analysis for major weapon systems. Prerequisite: GB3042 or equivalent.

GB4420 Technology and Information Systems for Logistics and Operations (3-0) Fall/Spring

Overview of the use and value of information systems and technology applied to logistics and operations management. Examines the cost-benefit analysis of technology, and the evaluation of technological alternatives. Surveys commercial software available to facilitate logistics and operations management, including enterprise resource planning systems. Explores typical difficulties confronted when implementing technological solutions. Prerequisite: None.

GB4430 Defense Transportation System (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course examines how the Defense Transportation System supports the DoD mission, including the responsibilities of USTRANSCOM and its Transportation Component Commands, CONUS transportation and strategic lift, as well as institutional constraints and other managerial issues. Prerequisite: None.

GB4440 Simulation Modeling for Management Decision Making (4-0) Winter/Summer

Modeling and risk analysis for managerial decision making. Case studies of simulation modeling applications to weapon system acquisition, logistics, transportation, distribution, communications and production systems. Prerequisite: GB3040 or other introductory probability and statistics (may be taken concurrently).

GB4450 Logistics Strategy (4-0) Fall/Spring

DAU Equiv: LOG 304. This is the logistics capstone course. The course explores and analyzes the concepts, processes and methods of strategic planning and execution emphasizing aggressive proactive techniques to ensure maximum logistics influence on major weapon systems acquisition as well as optimum life cycle management of fielded systems. Cultural constraints of the current logistics environment and how to succeed in it is a significant focus of the course. The course examines and analyzes key opportunities for maximum logistics influence in requirements, development, contracting, test and evaluation, reliability, and maintainability as well as financial management and communications. The course features logistics management relevance to service roles and missions. The course employs lectures, guided discussions, case studies, role-playing, panel discussions, and lessons learned in the DoD acquisition environment. For the final examination project, the class is divided into teams and produces a comprehensive strategic plan for logistics for a fictitious major program. Prerequisite: GB3051 and GB4052; recommend GB3510 unless enrolled in the MBA Energy Program.

GB4460 Logistics Risk Assessment and Control (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course addresses the risk assessment and control issues that are inherent in most logistics decisions. Risk control topics include Safety Stock, Safety Capacity and Safety Lead Time, as well as Statistical Process Control. Risk assessment and valuation topics include Portfolio Selection, Real Options and Value-At-Risk. Monte Carlo Simulation will be used as a primary tool for assessing risk, and will be contrasted with Discounted Cash Flow approaches. Students should also develop an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of risk assessment through a comparison of prescriptive versus descriptive (e.g., Prospect Theory) approaches to the study of risk judgments. Prerequisites: GB3040, and GB3042 or permission of instructor.

GB4480 Supply Chain Management I (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course is designed to provide an introduction to supply chain management Change Description (SCM). A supply chain is a network of organizations that supply and transform materials, and distribute final products to customers. Supply chain management is a broadly defined term for the analysis and improvement of flows of material, information, and money through this network of suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and customers. SCM also plays a vital role in the military operations. The objective of SCM is to deliver the right product to the right customer at the right time. SCM emphasizes inventory-service level tradeoffs across the chain of players that, together, provide the product to a customer. Logistics has traditionally focused on materials issues within and downstream from the factory while SCM looks at the entire network of players, both up and down stream, and perhaps has more of an emphasis on information flows through the network. Logistics has traditionally been considered a more tactical topic while SCM has risen to prominence in recent years for addressing strategic aspects of product distribution. Ultimately, logistics and SCM activities are concerned with coordinating demand and supply. Common elements in that coordination are the management of materials (inventories), the location of materials (warehouses), and the movement of materials (transportation). As part of the coordination, an analyst must consider product and process designs as well as information flows between various players in the networks. These elements form the basis of this course. The two main objectives of this course are to help students understand: (1) the fundamental concepts and techniques necessary for attaining a world class performance in supply chain management, and (2) how these concepts and techniques can be applied to design, plan and operate supply chains supporting military operations. Prerequisites: GB3042 or permission from instructor.

GB4490 Special Topics in Supply Chain Networks (4-0) Fall

This course focuses on conceptual understanding of the Supply Chain Networks for decision-making. The course builds the knowledge for identifying distribution and transportation networks and to optimize it using advanced analytical tools. To incorporate the bigger picture of network optimization problem, the course includes real applications in private sector as well as in military and non-governmental organizations. This is done with the analysis and discussion of articles of diverse applications such as (1) Ammunition requirement planning for the Canadian army; (2) Elkem (a Norwegian company) redesigning its supply chain using optimization; (3) SCM at the USCG repair and supply center; (4) Location of disaster recovery centers in Florida County.

<GB4510 - GB4999 Courses>

GB4510 Strategic Resource Management (4-0) Winter/Summer

The objective of this course is to integrate business analysis, financial analysis, and strategic analysis in solving complex management problems involving the allocation of scarce resources to achieve overall organization objectives. Resources here are not limited to financial resources but also include human and physical resources. The course will make use of a wide variety of management tools such as value chain analysis, competitive strategy, market positioning, supply chain management, activity analysis, target costing, cost of quality, and business process improvement techniques. Prerequisites: Completion of GB4530 Management Control Systems or permission of instructor.

GB4520 Internal Control & Audit (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course provides an introduction to the objectives of and activities related to internal control and audits, including design and evaluation of internal controls, auditing standards, audit reports, audit evidence, and audit tests. The course includes an overview of audits of financial reports and records and of government operations, with attention given to Government Auditing Standards. Prerequisite: GB3051, Management Accounting.

GB4530 Management Control Systems (4-0) Spring/Fall

Overview of internal controls processes. Study of the design, implementation, and evaluation of management planning and control systems in Navy and Defense organizations with comparisons to large, complex private sector organizations. Specific topics include the need for planning and control, strategic planning, the resource allocation process, organization of the management control function, measurement of inputs and outputs, budgeting, reporting, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: GB3051.

GB4540 Conrad Seminar (2-0) Winter/Summer

This course provides DoD military officers with an awareness of real life implementation of the education they have received in the (MBA (FM) curriculum). There are lectures on the Budgeting process and pending changes thereto, and an exercise in taking a hypothetical budget reduction, . Senior level guest speakers from the Department of the Navy and Department of Defense discuss current Financial Management issues with the students. and five VTCs originated in the Pentagon by FMB, Director of Navy Resource Requirements (N-8), Resource Director for the JCS (J-8), ASN(FM&C) Counsel (FMC), Director of Navy Budget (N-82) and Graduates presently in their "Pay Back" tour. There is also an Air Force Cohort which covers about 40% of their course and addressing Air Force "Unique" processes and paralleling the framework of the Navy/Marine Cohort. Sixty percent of the Air Force course is jointly conducted with the Generic part of the Navy/Marine allowing for more Joint education. International Students are welcomed to participate as an elective. This course is graded pass/ fail. Prerequisite: GB3510.

GB4550 Advanced Financial Reporting (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course explores both underlying theory and practical applications of financial reporting and analysis. The course builds on financial reporting foundations presented in an introductory course and on basic concepts covered in auditing, economics, and finance courses. The course first develops an understanding of alternative accounting measurements, and then examines how alternative accounting policies are selected in a dynamic financial reporting environment that includes owners; creditors; employees; professional analysts; portfolio managers; and regulatory agencies. Finally, the course will determine how best to communicate financial performance and financial position to decision makers, users, and managers. Prerequisites: GB3051, GB4052, GB3510.

GB4560 Defense Financial Management (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course focuses on the competencies required of a Defense Financial Manager. It examines the diverse concepts, theories, and practices addressed in numerous specialty courses and ties them together in the framework of Defense Financial Management. The areas of coverage include: the Government Resource Management Environment, the Defense Resource Management Environment, Personnel Management, Manpower Management, Management and Internal Controls, Fiscal Law, the Planning, Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES), Cost and Economic Analysis, Business Management Process Improvement, Accounting, Finance, and Auditing. Prerequisite: None.

GB4570 Advanced Finance (2-0) As Required

This course is designed to provide insights into advanced topics in financial decision making process encountered by commercial enterprises. Major topics covered include long-term financing, lease financing, optimal capital structure determination, dividend policy, security issues and refunding, risk analysis and real options, derivatives and risk management. Prerequisite: GB4052.

GB4580 Modeling for Planning and Control (3-0) Fall/Spring

Study of sophisticated analytical methods for various cost, policy and decision scenarios in DoD and other organizations. Emphasis is on developing analytical methods as decision support tools, with available computer software as computational aids. Major topics include regression, learning curve, Monte Carlo simulation, and time series models. Prerequisite: GB4043.

GB4999 Elective (4-0) Fall/Spring

Elective course to be selected by student with approval by academic associate.

GE Courses (EMBA Program)

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<GE3010 - GE3510 Courses>

GE3010 Organizations As Systems and Structures (3-0) Winter/Summer

GE3010 Organizations As Systems and Structures (3-0) Winter/Summer Open to EMBA DL students only. Defense organizations are purposive systems comprising tasks and technologies, vertical and lateral coordination structures and processes, reward systems, and individual motivation. This course prepares leaders to understand the organizational system components and their relationships: inputs (e.g., environment, history), design factors (i.e., people, task, structure, culture) and outputs/outcomes (e.g., productivity, satisfaction, growth). A primary focus is on the organizational level of analysis and includes such topics as environment, hierarchy and structural configuration, with special emphasis on the context and organization of DoD. Applications and cases address command and control, joint task forces and network centric operations with attention to organizational theory and design tradeoffs. Prerequisite: None.

GE3011 Management of Teams (2-0) Winter/Summer

Open to EMBA DL students only. Teams are a building block of today's organizations. Teams are evident throughout DoD in such forms as operational squads, integrated product teams (IPTs), R&D innovation teams, and Joint Task Forces. The course examines the differences between groups and teams, between leader-managed and self-managed teams, between virtual and face-to-face teams, and between effective and ineffective teams. Analysis of effective teams include such issues as team dynamics, decision making, rewards, commitment, and the management of conflict (inter-personal, intra-team, and inter-team) in which power, influence and negotiation play central parts. Prerequisite: None.

GE3031 Principles of Acquisition Management (3-0) As Required

Open to EMBA students only. This course introduces the fundamental principles of public and private sector acquisition management by examining current acquisition policy issues, strategies, contractual decisions, and program management concepts. The aspects of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling efforts within a risk managed process will be examined. Acquisition functional areas addressed in this course include: logistics, test and evaluation, systems engineering, manufacturing management, quality assurance, funds management, budgeting, research and development, and contracting management. Prerequisite: None.

GE3042 Operations Management (4-0) As Required

Open to EMBA students only. An overview of operations in military and commercial systems. The course has three sections: (1) Creating processes, including a survey of process types, capacity planning, and service system design; (2) Controlling processes, including MRP/ERP systems and the role of information; and (3) Coordinating processes, including inventory management, purchasing, and supply chain management. Prerequisite: GE3043.

GE3043 Analytical Tools for Decision Making (3-0) As Required

Open to EMBA students only. The objective of this course is to enhance students' ability to solve complex managerial problems and make decisions under conditions of uncertainty and competing objectives through the use of computer-based modeling techniques. The course incorporates probability material, decision models and decision analysis, decision trees, forecasting and simulation. The interactive environment of the electronic spreadsheet is used to provide an intuitive understanding of basic principles (e.g., understanding uncertainty and risk with Monte Carlo simulation rather than mathematical analysis). Prerequisite: None.

GE3050 Financial Reporting and Analysis (3-0) Winter/Summer

Open to EMBA DL students only. This course covers theory, concepts, and practices underlying Financial Accounting and Financial Reporting. The conceptual structure underlying the reporting of economic events in the form of the balance sheet, the income statement, and the statement of cash flows is first presented. Accounting recognition and measurement issues surrounding revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and equity are introduced and analyzed. Finally, different forms of financial analysis based on financial report information are addressed. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the manager or user perspective. Attention is given to the federal government financial reporting model and standards. Prerequisite: None.

GE3051 Cost Management (3-0) Spring

Open to EMBA DL students only. This course introduces students to cost management concepts and theories which are used by managers to make decisions on the allocation of financial, physical, and human resources to achieve strategic as well as short-term organizational goals and objectives and evaluate performance using financial and non-financial measures. The course is designed for those having a prior course in financial reporting and analysis or financial accounting. Cost management includes traditional tools and techniques such as cost behavior for decision making, activity costing, cost allocation, and standard costing. Prerequisite: GE3050.

GE3070 Economics for Defense Managers (3-0) As Required

Open to EMBA DL students only. Develops the fundamental tools of microeconomics and macroeconomics, and applies them to defense management and resource allocation. Course centers on defense applications of economic theory. Topics covered include: defense and the macro economy; markets and their interactions with defense acquisition and contracting; national security implications of globalization; and efficiency in defense decision making. Prerequisite: MA2XXX, College algebra.

GE3109 Ethics and Moral Development (3-0) As Required

Offered to EMBA students in their first quarter: The objective of this course is to provide newly-enrolled Executive MBA students with an introduction to the ethical challenges of the global Defense business environment facing Navy corporate business leaders and resource managers. Through the use of case analyses and discussion, the course will explore the application of ethical thinking to contemporary issues in the private and public sectors. The course goals include: 1) introduce ethical concepts which are relevant to the moral and ethical dilemmas inherent in business decisions; 2) help students develop the critical thinking and analytical skills required to address complex issues; 3) identify the range of ethical problems facing senior leaders in business and government; and 4) encourage the students to develop a personal approach to achieve ethical outcomes in the corporate-level decision-making process. The students will use the managerial perspective and critical thinking skills developed in this course throughout the remainder of their studies to identify the ethical dimension in the process of formulating and implementing Navy policy and business strategies required to build and maintain the Fleet of the 21st Century. Prerequisite: None.

GE3221 Principles of Acquisition and Program Management I (3-0) As Required

Open to EMBA students only. This is the first of two courses which provides the student with an understanding of the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods within this process. The course examines management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods and functional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationships will be examined in team exercise settings. Topics, from a program management perspective, include the evolution and current state of systems acquisition management, the system acquisition life cycle, requirements analysis, systems engineering, contract management, resource management, test and evaluation, user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Case studies are used to analyze various acquisition issues. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) has granted MN 3221-MN3222, GE3221-GE3222 equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, PMT 251, PMT 257, BCF 102 and BCF 103. PREREQUISITE: None.

GE3222 Principles of Acquisition and Program Management II (3-0) As Required

Open to EMBA students only. This is the second of two courses which provides the student with an understanding of the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods within this process. The course examines management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods and functional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationships will be examined in team exercise settings. Topics, from a program management perspective, include the evolution and current state of systems acquisition management, the system acquisition life cycle, requirements analysis, systems engineering, contract management, resource management, test and evaluation, user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Case studies are used to analyze various acquisition issues. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) has granted MN 3221-MN3222, GE3221-GE3222 equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, PMT 251, PMT 257, BCF 102 and BCF 103. Prerequisite: GE3221 or consent of instructor.

GE3306 Strategic Purchasing (3-0) As Required

For EMBA students only. This course is a graduate-level seminar in strategic purchasing. The course will be taught through a combination of formal lecture, guided discussion, and case analysis. The primary goal of this course is to develop, structure, and execute purchasing, not as a functional activity, but rather as a strategic component of total supply chain management. The course emphasizes the concept that companies with world-class purchasing practices derive a competitive advantage in their industries from their procurement and sourcing strategies. The course develops the concept of competitive advantage through strategic purchasing as it relates to efficient and effective structure and management within the Department of Defense. The emphasis on world-class purchasing practices entails observation and analysis of commercial organizations and their purchasing practices. The student will investigate whether select commercial organizations' purchasing practices are useful to the DoD, and determine practical implementation for use in the DoD acquisition environment. Prerequisite: None.

GE3510 Defense Financial Management Practice (3-0) As Required

For EMBA students. This course is designed for MBA students and presumes the student has a foundation including the PPBE system and Congressional Authorization and Appropriation processes. This course concentrates on financial management practices within DoD as distinct from policy and budgeting theory. The course covers the actors and activities and mechanics of building and defending budgets. It covers funding mechanisms for programs and activities, addressing the proper use and management of appropriated, reimbursable, and revolving funds. Basic principles of fiscal law are explored. It then addresses financial management and stewardship topics including budgetary accounting, management of cost drivers, the relationship between comptrollership and contracting, and internal controls. Contemporary financial management issues are discussed. Exercises and case studies are used to develop the students' ability to apply financial management concepts to real life situations. Prerequisite: None.

<GE4015 - GE4510 Courses>

GE4015 Managing Complex Change in the DoD Environment (3-0) As Required

Open to EMBA students only. This course recognizes and describes the dilemmas inherent in any effort to change a human system. Emphasis is placed on strategies and technologies for planning, managing, and implementing change. The course emphasizes approaches to planning and managing change that reflect the complexity of organizations comprised of several interdependent systems--technology, structure, task, culture, and people. The course is application-oriented and intended to enhance skill development. Prerequisite: GE3010.

GE4016 Strategic Management (4-0) Winter/Summer

Strategic Management entails the establishment of an organization's direction and the implementation and evaluation of that direction in view of the organization's external environment and its internal capabilities. The principal aim of this course is the transfer and adaptation of the principles of business strategic management to the Department of Defense and other government agencies. In previous courses, students concentrated on the functional elements of management (e.g., accounting, finance, acquisition, logistics, contracting, etc.). This course addresses the challenges of setting direction and implementing strategies for the total system or whole organization. Cases and approaches from the public and private sectors enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities to strategically think, plan, and manage. PREREQUISITES: NONE.

GE4021 E-Business for Defense (3-0) As Required

Open to EMBA students only. The network era has revolutionized the manner in which business processes are conducted, and we have only just begun to understand the potential of how such processes can be conducted in the future. What we do understand is that electronic business (e-business) represents a combination of technologies, business models and managerial techniques that can enable fundamental process innovation with order-of-magnitude performance improvement, if conceived and implemented well. This applies in particular to military enterprises of the U.S. Defense Department, under tremendous pressure to modernize their forces and improve the quality of life for service men and women, because of the huge size, global reach, time-critical processes and hazardous missions associated with the "business" processes of military operations. This course addresses the application of e-business technologies, business models and management to defense. The course builds on students' knowledge of operations management, supply chain management, and strategy to address technologies, models and applications of business (e-business). The course has an explicit focus on e-business applications, opportunities and implications in defense organizations, even though many exemplars from private industry are discussed, and it integrates both theory and application to provide knowledge necessary to organize and manage in the networked, paperless enterprise of today and tomorrow. Course topics will include: IT and Strategy, IT and Organization, Extending the Enterprise (transformation), Making a Case for IT, Understanding Internetworking Infrastructure, Assuring Reliable and Secure IT Services, Managing Diverse IT Infrastructures and Managing IT Outsourcing. Prerequisite: None.

GE4043 Business Modeling and Analysis (3-0) As Required

Open to EMBA students only. This course introduces mathematical modeling for a sound conceptual understanding of the decision-making process. This course familiarizes the students with applications, assumptions, and limitations of the quantitative methods in modeling. It focuses on the development of mathematical and spreadsheet models, the verification of those models, sensitivity analysis of the solutions generated from a model, and the implementation of those solutions. Some of the topics covered include linear programming, non-linear and integer programming, simulation, and forecasting. The process of modeling and particular modeling tools are applied to business problems in finance, acquisition, logistics and manpower planning. Prerequisites: None.

GE4052 Managerial Finance (3-0) As Required

Study of capital budgeting techniques. This course provides an overview of the basic concepts and principles of financial management in the private sector and its implication on government contracting. It is designed to provide insights into the financial decision-making process encountered by commercial enterprises. The major emphasis is on financial environment, risk and return analysis, valuation models, cost of capital determination, optimal capital structure, and short-term and long-term financing. Prerequisite: GE3050.

GE4053 DoD Mission and Resource Determination 4-0) As Required

This course analyzes the resource requirements process within the Department of Defense (DoD) and in the executive and legislative branches of the U.S. federal government. It begins with a summary of the current threat situation and potential changes to it. Once the threat is defined, the study of the resource allocation process to meet the threat begins. The course covers the resource planning and budgeting processes of the Department of the Navy, DoD and the federal government. It includes the politics of executive and congressional budgeting, and DoD budget and financial management processes and procedures including budget formulation and execution. It also includes analysis of the Planning, Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES) used by DoD to plan, budget and implement national defense resource management policy and programs. Other areas included are budget process and fiscal policy reform and the dynamics of internal DoD competition for resources. Executive and congressional budget processes are assessed to indicate how national security policy is resourced and implemented through the budget process. Spending for national security policy is tracked from budget submission through resolution, authorization and appropriation. Budget formulation, negotiation, and execution strategies are evaluated to indicate the dynamics of executive-legislative competition over resource allocation priorities. Supplemental appropriation patterns and current year budget execution patterns and problems are also considered. Prerequisite: None.

GE4101 Collaborative Problem Solving I (3-3) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

GE4101 is the first part of the capstone project which uses a collaborative approach to integrate the knowledge and skills gained in the EMBA program. Participants are introduced to an applied research framework designed to enable them to work from theory to identify a business problem to be solved for a command; create a research design for data collection and analysis; and form conclusions and recommendations. Prerequisite: Completion of the previous seven quarters of the EMBA program.

GE4102 Collaborative Problem Solving II (3-3) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

GE4102 is the second part of the capstone project which uses a collaborative approach to integrate the knowledge and skills gained in the EMBA program. Participants work in small teams to prepare a project proposal, a final report, and a presentation containing recommendations to solve one of the command's business problems. Prerequisite: Completion of the previous seven quarters of the EMBA program.

GE4310 Strategic Acquisition Management (3-0) Spring

This course extends students' understanding of the complex and dynamic defense acquisition environment and ways in which various functional disciplines (e.g., contracting, test and evaluation, logistics) may be effectively integrated in successful acquisition programs. The effects and implications of current policy initiatives (e.g., acquisition reform, outsourcing) and contemporary industry trends on defense acquisition will be explored. Students will use relevant acquisition program cases to apply their knowledge by analyzing management challenges and developing strategies for success. Prerequisite: GE3222.

GE4480 Defense Supply Chain Management (3-0) Winter/Summer

This course is designed to provide an introduction to supply chain management (SCM). A supply chain is a network of organizations that supply and transform materials, and distribute final products to customers. Supply chain management is a broadly defined term for the analysis and improvement of flows of material, information, and money through this network of suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and customers. SCM also plays a vital role in the military operations. The objective of SCM is to deliver the right product to the right customer at the right time. SCM emphasizes inventory-service level tradeoffs across the chain of players that, together, provide the product to a customer. Logistics has traditionally focused on materials issues within and downstream from the factory while SCM looks at the entire network of players, both up and down stream, and perhaps has more of an emphasis on information flows through the network. Logistics has traditionally been considered a more tactical topic while SCM has risen to prominence in recent years for addressing strategic aspects of product distribution. Ultimately, logistics and SCM activities are concerned with coordinating demand and supply. Common elements in that coordination are the management of materials (inventories), the location of materials (warehouses), and the movement of materials (transportation). As part of the coordination, an analyst must consider product and process designs as well as information flows between various players in the networks. These elements form the basis of this course. The two main objectives of this course are to help students understand: (1) the fundamental concepts and techniques necessary for attaining a world class performance in supply chain management, and (2) how these concepts and techniques can be applied to design, plan and operate supply chains supporting military operations. Prerequisites: GE3042 or permission from instructor.

GE4510 Strategic Resource Management (3-0) As Required

The objective of this course is to integrate business analysis, financial analysis, and strategic analysis in solving complex management problems involving the allocation of scarce resources to achieve overall organization objectives. Resources here are not limited to financial resources, but also include human and physical resources. The course will make use of a wide variety of management tools such as value chain analysis, competitive strategy, market positioning, supply chain management, activity analysis, target costing, cost of quality, and business process improvement techniques. Prerequisite: GE3051.

MN Courses

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<MN0163 - MN3042 Courses>

MN0163 Thesis Writing Workshop (0-1) Spring

Guidelines for scientific writing for the thesis are given with examples and opportunities for practice. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MN0810 Thesis Research for Systems Management Students (0-8) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Every student conducting thesis research in Systems Management resident programs will enroll in this course. Prerequisite: None.

MN0811 Thesis Research for Non-Resident Business & Public Policy Students (0-4) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Every student conducting thesis research in the Distance Learning Contract Management (835) and Program Management (836) degree programs will enroll in this course.

MN2039 Basic Quantitative Methods In Management (4-0) Fall

This course introduces the mathematical basis required for advanced management and cost-benefit analysis. Math topics include algebra, graphs, differential calculus, including both single and multiple variable functions, and indefinite and definite integrals. Management concepts include cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis, marginal analysis, unconstrained and constrained optimization, and welfare analysis. Prerequisite: College algebra or consent of instructor.

MN2111 Navy Manpower, Personnel, and Training Systems I (2-0) Fall

An introduction to the major issues, theory, and practice of the military MPT&E system. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MN2112 Seminar In Manpower, Personnel, and Training Issues II (0-2) Summer

Continuation of MN2111. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Open to thesis students.

MN2155 Accounting for Management (4-0) Winter/Summer

Study of the fundamentals of financial and managerial accounting relevant to financial management. Introduction to financial accounting stressing accrual concepts and the content and analysis of financial statements. More in-depth focus on management accounting topics, including costing techniques for products and programs, use of cost information for decision making, capital budgeting, and financial performance measures. Applications of managerial accounting tools to DoD situations. Prerequisite: None.

MN2304 Seminar In Product Development (0-4) As Required

This course brings both government and industry product development leaders into the academic forum for interaction with students. Guest lecturers include government and industry product development executives, program managers, laboratory and field personnel, department officials, congressional members and staff personnel. Visits to government and industry facilities. Thesis and research presentations. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MN3001 Economics for Acquisition Managers (3-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Develops the fundamental tools of microeconomics and macroeconomics and applies them to topics in the management and allocation of resources in defense acquisition management with particular emphasis on the applications of economic theory to defense decision making. Topics covered include defense and the macro economy; markets and their effects on defense acquisition and contracting practices; the economics of corporate strategy; and efficiency in defense decision making. Prerequisite: None.

MN3012 Communications Strategies for Effective Leadership (3-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course provides DoD military officers and civilians with the communication strategies and skills to manage and lead in the dynamic DoD environment. Instruction focuses on assessing various communication models, making strategic media choices, writing effective informative documents, developing associates' communication competencies through various feedback roles, and giving lucid briefings. Prerequisite: None.

MN3042 Operations Management (3-0) As Required

This course provides an overview of operations in military and commercial systems. The course has three sections: (1) creating processes, including a survey of process types, capacity planning, and service system design; (2) controlling processes, including MRP/ERP systems and the role of information; and (3) coordinating processes, including inventory management, purchasing, and supply chain management. This course is the Distance Learning version of GB3042. Prerequisite: None.

<MN3101 - MN3172 Courses>

MN3108 Leadership In Product Development (3-2) As Required

This is a product development course providing a broad framework for the leadership of end-to-end product commercialization with a student hands-on design challenge, to give students perspective and appreciation for the critical success factors and inhibitors to successful commercialization of complex products and systems. The format includes lectures, guest speakers, case studies and a design challenge. Topics include product development strategy and leadership, the front-end process, product delivery, distribution and customer support. The Design Challenge is as a multi-disciplinary system design experience. Students work in teams to design, build, test and demonstrate a real product. The Design Challenge culminates with a prototype demonstration competition. Prerequisite: None.

MN3111 Analysis of Human Resource Management (4-0) Winter

A broad coverage of human behavior in the work situation, with key emphasis on the issues of work in the Navy Manpower Personnel and Training Environment. Topical areas covered include selection, placement, training development, and evaluation of personnel; motivation, remuneration, morale, supervision, and working conditions in military organizations; job design and organization development within complex military bureaucracies; equipment design and man-machine interface, and the impact of technological programs within the military. Prerequisite: GB3010.

MN3117 Organizational Processes (4-0) As Required

The purpose of this course is to provide the conceptual framework and skills needed to manage and lead organizations. The focus will be on three levels of skills needed to manage modern organizations: skills needed to manage individuals, skills needed to manage teams, and skills needed to manage the organization as a whole. It focuses on the organization of the future, identifies its characteristics, and explores the implications for living in, managing, and leading such an organization. The course also focuses on skills such as negotiating, cross-cultural communication, and teamwork. It examines the creation of the structures needed within the firm and the alliances, learning, and change practices needed to maintain global leadership. The course will use cases, experiential exercises, readings, discussions, and papers. Students have the opportunity to integrate conceptual material with their own experiences, beliefs, and actions. Prerequisite: None.

MN3118 Negotiation and Consensus Building (4-0) Spring

Security, Stability, Reconstruction and Transition (SSTR) environments bring together representatives from different nations and organizations. In order to accomplish the goals of interest, these varying representatives must develop awareness, appreciation, and ability to collaborate with each other. There is no formal organization that provides structures or standards to guide the collaboration of these individuals; they must rely on informal mechanisms for collaborative post-conflict efforts. Because the goals and interests of the participating parties frequently are not in alignment, negotiation and consensus-building capabilities contribute importantly to success. Negotiation and consensus building challenges students to develop their skills in interpersonal and group dynamics (e.g., conflict management, communication, perspective taking, decision making, team building) at both the dyadic level and the group team level. The pedagogy of the course uses simulations, cases, and experiential exercises that include high levels of cultural, ethnic, organizational, and ideological diversity. Consensus building at both the dyadic and group levels is based on principles of self-organization and self-management, which are critical success factors in an environment such as SSTR where a hierarchic control system is not available as the mechanism of coordination among participants. Prerequisite: None.

MN3121 Organizational Design for Special Operations (4-0) As Required

Principles of organizational design are critically examined and applied to special operations' missions and organizations. Focus is on the organizational level of analysis and includes such topics as organizational environments, key success factors, technology and information systems, configuration and structure, organizational learning, reward systems, and decision making. Case method is used to develop diagnostic skills and a systemic perspective. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the SOLIC curriculum or consent of instructor.

MN3145 Marketing Management (4-0) Spring

This course takes a general management approach to marketing, examining (1) marketing as a process that creates and sustains customer value; and (2) the manager's role in assuring that the firm delivers products that are successful in the marketplace. The curriculum will emphasize approaches to market research (the "voice of the customer"), innovation, creating customer value in product development, product management, and general management of marketing activities. Topics include: market oriented strategic planning, the TQM marketing process, market research, segmentation, target markets, differentiation, product management, the marketing mix, customer satisfaction, and e-commerce. Case studies are used extensively. Prerequisite: None.

MN3154 Financial Management in the Armed forces (3-0) Winter/Summer

This course is designed for non-MBA students and focuses on financial management policies and practices in the DoD. It begins with a foundation including the origin of the Defense budget from national strategic planning through the PPBE system and the submission of the President's Budget to Congress. The Congressional Authorization and Appropriation processes and the flow of funds to the activity level complete the foundation. The course next explores the funding mechanisms for programs and activities, addressing the proper use and management of appropriated, reimbursable and revolving funds. Basic principles of fiscal law are explored. The course concludes with financial management and stewardship topics including budgetary accounting, management of cost drivers, and internal controls. Contemporary financial management issues are discussed. Exercises and case studies are used to develop the students' ability to apply financial management concepts to real life situations. Prerequisite: None.

MN3155 Financial Management for Acquisition Managers (2-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course is a study of financial management practices and issues associated with federal government acquisition programs. The course has emphasis on (1) the resource management process flow from initiation of a new acquisition program through execution of appropriated funds (procurement and research & development accounts) for that program, (2) the congressional approval and review process unique to procurement, and (3) cost estimation, analysis and evaluation as tools for sound acquisition management decision making, and long-term investment analysis. Prerequisites: MN2155; and MN3331 or MN3221 or consent of instructor.

MN3156 Financial and Managerial Accounting (4-0) As Required

This course is designed as a first course in Business Financial Management for graduate students. The course covers a range of topics in financial accounting, managerial accounting and business finance. All topics covered share a common theme in that they are related to the creation and use of financial models and information. The course requires critical thinking and the ability to analyze and apply financial models and reasoning in the context of case studies. The course is divided into two broad areas: Financial Information and Financial Management. Within these areas, specific topics include: financial accounting, financial reports, financial analysis, capital structure, costing systems, performance measurement and control, and investment analysis. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate standing, college algebra, MN3108 and MN3117.

MN3172 Resourcing National Security: Policy and Process (3-0) Winter/Summer

This course analyzes federal policy-making with emphasis on resource decision making for national defense. The roles of principal budget participants are examined in detail. Executive (especially DoD) and congressional budget processes are assessed to indicate how national security policy is implemented through resource allocation. Spending for national security policy is tracked from budget submission through resolution, authorization and appropriation. The politics of budgeting for national defense is evaluated to indicate the dynamics of executive-legislative competition over scarce federal resources. Graded Course. Prerequisite: None.

<MN3221 - MN3342 Courses>

MN3221 Principles of Acquisition and Program Management I (3-0) Summer

This is the first of two courses which provides the student with an understanding of the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods within this process. The course examines management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods and functional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationships will be examined in team exercise settings. Topics, from a program management perspective, include the evolution and current state of systems acquisition management, the system acquisition life cycle, requirements analysis, systems engineering, contract management, resource management, test and evaluation, user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Case studies are used to analyze various acquisition issues. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) has granted MN 3221-MN3222, GE3221-GE3222 equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, PMT 251, PMT 257, BCF 102 and BCF 103. PREREQUISITE: None.

MN3222 Principles of Acquisition and Program Management II (3-0) As Required

This is the second of two courses which provides the student with an understanding of the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods within this process. The course examines management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods and functional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationships will be examined in team exercise settings. Topics, from a program management perspective, include the evolution and current state of systems acquisition management, the system acquisition life cycle, requirements analysis, systems engineering, contract management, resource management, test and evaluation, user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Case studies are used to analyze various acquisition issues. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) has granted MN 3221-MN3222, GE3221-GE3222 equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, PMT 251, PMT 257, BCF 102 and BCF 103. Prerequisite: MN3221 or consent of instructor.

MN3301 Acquisition of Defense Systems (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course introduces the principles and concepts that underlie successful defense acquisition management. The course focuses on management of the acquisition process for defense systems from the development of an initial desired capability or need through design, development, production, fielding, sustainment, and disposal. Students gain an understanding of successful acquisition as an interdisciplinary activity through contributions and applications of principles from business, management, and technical disciplines. The course also emphasizes the statutory, regulatory, and policy environment of acquisition. Numerous case studies illustrate the application of concepts and principles in actual acquisition programs. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) has granted MN3301 equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, BCF 102 and BCF 103. Prerequisite: None.

MN3302 Advanced Program Management (2-0) As Required

Course builds on the student's experience in the acquisition workforce. Cases are used to examine each of the major disciplines in the acquisition process and bring each student to a current and common understanding of the acquisition environment, process, requirements and management approaches. Prerequisite: DAWIA Level II Certification.

MN3303 Principles of Acquisition and Contract Management (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course is an introduction to the principles of government acquisition and contracting. It presents the fundamentals of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the DoD FAR Supplement; the federal acquisition and contracting processes, including requirements determination, acquisition strategies, government contract law, ethics, contract types, contracting methods, and acquisition/contract management techniques. Prerequisite: None.

MN3304 Contract Pricing and Negotiations (5-2) Winter/Summer

This course involves the study and application of pricing theory and strategies, cost methods, cost and price analysis, cost principles, Cost Accounting Standards, and contract negotiations as used in the Federal Government. Students develop and sharpen negotiating skills by participating in practical negotiation exercises with corporations. Prerequisites: MN3303.

MN3306 Strategic Purchasing (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course is a graduate-level seminar in strategic purchasing. The course will be taught through a combination of formal lecture, guided discussion, and case analysis. The primary goal of this course is to develop, structure, and execute purchasing, not as a functional activity, but rather as a strategic component of total supply chain management. The course emphasizes the concept that companies with world-class purchasing practices derive a competitive advantage in their industries from their procurement and sourcing strategies. The course develops the concept of competitive advantage through strategic purchasing as it relates to efficient and effective structure and management within the Department of Defense. The emphasis on world-class purchasing practices entails observation and analysis of commercial organizations and their purchasing practices. The student will investigate whether select commercial organizations' purchasing practices are useful to the DoD and determine practical implementation for use in the DoD acquisition environment. Prerequisite: None.

MN3307 Entrepreneurship in Strategic Purchasing (3-0) Winter/Summer

MN3307 is a graduate level seminar on the entrepreneurial concept and management and its application to strategic purchasing. Entrepreneurial thinking is designed to exploit opportunities in uncertain environments. The primary goal for MN3307 is to explore and develop strategic and critical thinking in entrepreneurial concepts and management along with specific methods for utilizing these concepts and tools within world-class purchasing organizations. Students will critically examine how the entrepreneurial mindset is applied in progressive business ventures and how DoD and the government can effectively apply these concepts and management tools for effective and efficient purchasing operations. The foundation of MN3307 is an analysis of the process by which the entrepreneurial mindset generates new ideas, researches the likelihood of success, and successfully implements the idea. The course will also investigate the critical role of entrepreneurial leadership and scanning the environment for opportunity, and capitalizing on opportunities to benefit DoD purchasing operations. The course will be taught through a combination of informal lecture, guided discussion, case study, and student presentations. Prerequisite: None.

MN3309 Acquisition of Embedded Weapon Systems Software (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course examines the fundamentals of major Congressional statutes, agency policies and regulations, and legal precedents which govern the Federal procurement process. The course contrasts the legal regimes of private and government contracting with strong emphasis on unique aspects of government contracts law, including: appropriations limitations; the power to contract; competitive and non-competitive methods of contract formation; contract administration issues such as changes and terminations; transparency and oversight; and bid protests, size protests and disputes. The course prepares students to identify and choose among legal tools, strategies, and processes which should control their decision-making as contracting professionals. Prerequisites: MN3331 or MN3222 or MN3302.

MN3312 Government Contracts Law (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course examines the legal structure within which federal government contracts with private industry are formulated and executed. The course addresses the unique aspects of government contract law including such topics as agency authority, contract interpretation, disputes and remedies, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), socio-economic laws, labor law, property, patent and data rights, conflicts of interest, protests, and ethics. Comparisons are made with the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). Emphasis is on the use of Court and Board of Contract Appeals (BCA) cases. Prerequisites: MN3303 or MN3341.

MN3313 Contracting for Modeling and Simulation (M&S) (4-0) As Required

This course serves M&S certificates and degree programs offered by the Department of systems Engineering. This course familiarizes program managers, systems engineers, and other DoD managers with the major contracting issues involved in the acquisition and use of M&S products and services. Principal course topics include intellectual property (IP) issues, delivery terms, maintenance responsibility, standards for documentation, open architecture, interoperability, and reuse. Prerequisites: MV/SE3313 or permission of the instructor.

MN3315 Acquisition Management and Contract Administration (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course focuses on the management functions and decision-making techniques involved in the award and administration of Best Value competitively negotiated contracts. The first phase of the course concentrates on the source selection phase of the acquisition process; specific topics include acquisition planning, market research, source selection planning, proposal development, solicitation management, source selection evaluation, contract award, and contractor debriefings. The second phase of the course emphasizes the performance phase of the acquisition process; specific topic areas include organizing for contract administration, transitioning to performance, quality management, subcontract management, financial management, performance monitoring, change management, and contract closeout. Emphasis is on the use of legal case studies and practical exercises. Prerequisites: MN3304 and MN3312.

MN3318 Contingency Contracting (2-0) Winter/Summer

This course is a study of the principles of contingency contracting and the fundamental skills required to provide direct contracting support to joint tactical and operational forces participating in the full spectrum of armed conflict and military operations other than war, both domestic and overseas. Topics include: Types of Contingencies, Cross-Cultural Awareness, Contingency Contracting Officer Authority, Roles and Responsibilities, Anti-terrorism and Security, Planning, Contractual Methodologies and Instruments, Contract Administration, and Ethics/Standards of Conduct. Prerequisite: None.

MN3320 Contract Cost and Price Analysis (3-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course involves the study and application of pricing theory and strategies, costing methods, cost and price analysis, cost principles, Cost Accounting Standards, and related genres in examining proposed and incurred costs in Federal contracts in both pre-award and post-award contexts. Prerequisite: MN3303 or similar introductory contracting principles course. May not require this for MSCM students with extensive field experience and existing CON Level I DAU certification or higher.

MN3321 Federal Contract Negotiations (3-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course involves the study and application of the art and science of developing and conducting comprehensive government contract negotiations. Emphasis is placed on cost and price analytical techniques in the formulation and presentation of a pre-negotiation business clearance, strategy and actual conduct of negotiations in a simulated business environment. Prerequisite: MN3320.

MN3331 Principles of Acquisition and Program Management (5-1) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course provides the student with an understanding of the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods within this process. The course examines management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods and functional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationships will be examined in team exercise settings. Topics, from a program management perspective, include the evolution and current state of systems acquisition management, the system acquisition life cycle, requirements analysis, systems engineering, contract management, resource management, test and evaluation, user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Case studies are used to analyze various acquisition issues. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) has granted MN3331 equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, PMT 251, PMT 257, BCF 102 and BCF 103. Prerequisite: None.

MN3341 Advanced Contracting Principles (4-2) As Required

This course builds on the student's knowledge and experience in contracting to address the more complex pre-award contracting issues in the acquisition environment, including contracting methods, contract types, negotiation, source selection, contingency contracting, environmental contracting, contracting for services, R&D contracting and international procurement. Major issues regarding acquisition reform are addressed. Ethical issues throughout the contracting process are examined. Cases are used to illustrate methods for attacking contracting problems and challenges. Prerequisite: Enrolled in 835 curriculum or consent of instructor.

MN3342 Advanced Contract Management (4-1) As Required

This course builds on the student's knowledge and experience in contracting to address the more complex post-award contracting issues in the acquisition environment including disputes and appeals, claims, intellectual and technical data rights, post-award pricing and negotiations, terminations, contract modifications, traffic and transportation, value engineering, environmental contracting, contractor systems reviews, property administration, quality assurance, contract financing, alternative dispute resolution (ADR), labor relations, contractor performance monitoring and surveillance, contractor performance evaluation. Prerequisites: MN3341, MN3312.

<MN3352 - MN4354 Courses>

MN3352 Cost Management (3-0)

This course will explore the development and use of cost information by managers. Its focus will be on management applications and analyses rather than on bookkeeping techniques and methodologies. The course will examine accounting measurements and analyses that provide relevant information for management decision-making, operational control, and productivity improvement. These internally-oriented processes are fundamentally different from those used to comply with external financial accounting requirements. The primary objectives of the course are as follows: reinforce skills in reporting and analyzing managerial accounting information; develop experience in analyzing this information from the perspective of its various users, especially management; develop the ability to identify and communicate relevant managerial accounting information; and develop an appreciation of the usefulness and limitations of managerial accounting information. Developed for Cost Management Certificate Program. Prerequisite: Department of Army approval for enrollment.

MN3353 Operations Management (3-0)

This course is about the fundamentals of managing manufacturing and service operations and about how DoD managers can effectively design and control operational processes. Helping students understand the concepts and techniques necessary for attaining a world-class performance in manufacturing and service operations is the main learning objective of this course. Analyzing and continuously improving enterprise-wide processes is critically important for achieving such a performance and hence the course will adopt a "process management" viewpoint while addressing a variety of operational and strategic issues. The course begins by introducing the operations function and its "mission" in terms of cost, quality, speed, service, and flexibility. Several exercises and cases are used here to illustrate the concepts fundamental to process analysis, including capacity, bottleneck, cycle time, and inventory, and their implications to cost management. The book by Goldratt, The Goal, is also discussed to provide a real-world context to the variety of issues addressed in the course, and to introduce the Theory of Constraints (TOC). At this point the course will cover the topics of capacity planning, inventory management, MRP/ERP and project management. The course will end with an introduction to supply chain management, a topic integrating a number of concepts covered earlier in the course. Developed for Cost Management Certificate Program. Prerequisite: MN3352.

MN3355 Organizational Behavior and Strategy Development (3-0)

This course teaches students to analyze, understand, and influence the organizations with which they work. To do this, the course introduces psychological, behavioral and communication principles that can be applied in organizations, with a focus on the introduction and maintenance of cost management programs. Throughout this course, we develop leadership skills and communication competencies, identify ways to increase individuals' and groups' performance, and practice organizational analysis and problem solving. As a crucial component of this process, we also explore social influence principles to work more effectively with individuals and groups. The course combines theoretical and practical knowledge to prepare students for situations that commonly arise and give them the tools to deal with unexpected or unusual real world situations. Assignments and projects focus on applying organizational principles to cost management in the Dept. of Defense. Prerequisites: MN4354. Available: Per sponsor requirements.

MN4354 Financial Analysis and Cost Management (3-0)

Provides an understanding of management control, management control structures and processes and how they are designed to control costs while also organizing work processes and motivating employees to work productively. Course objectives are understanding of (i) management control principles and processes, (ii) the application of cost management principles and processes, (iii) defense management control process events and timing, (iv) cost control and accounting data independence, (v) application of case study method to study of management control and cost management, (vi) cost control dynamics in budget execution, (vii) management and cost control reform initiatives and (viii) contemporary defense cost and resource policy issues. Prerequisite: MN3353. Available: Per sponsor requirements.

<MN3361 - MN3510 Courses>

MN3361 Software Acquisition Management (2-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Advanced Acquisition Program. This course concentrates on the management of software products and software intensive systems. It is intended to focus essential program management techniques on the software element to ensure successful and timely system development. The course provides the student with knowledge of software acquisition management control processes and tools. Current software acquisition articles and caselets are analyzed for application of program leadership, software development techniques, and management tools applied. Topic areas include: DoD software environment; software acquisition strategies; impediments to successful software intensive system development; software oriented requirements development; contracting for software, software discriminate proposals; software test and evaluation management; Post Deployment Software Support; risk management; and software costing and budgeting. Integrative exercises involving software managerial problem solving and decision making in the program management environment are used. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

MN3362 Acquisition Design Verification and System Assessment (2-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Advanced Acquisition Program. This course examines Developmental, Operational, and Joint Test & Evaluation as viewed from the Program Manager's perspective. The student will be able to distinguish the difference between the various testing types and the impact testing results will have on the decision makers thought process. Actual military and civilian test cases are used as examples for discussion purposes. Topics include the role of T&E in the Systems Engineering Process, T&E policy Structure and Oversight Mechanism, Requirements Generation, Modeling and Simulation, Alternative Acquisition Program T&E, Human systems Integration and Live Fire T&E. Integrative case studies involving managerial problem solving and decision making in the PMO environment are also used to provide application of concepts in both IPT teaming and multiple-role individual settings. Teamwork exercises are conducted to reinforce concepts and add real-world human dynamics. Upon completion, all exercises are evaluated with after-action reviews and assessments. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

MN3363 Acquisition Manufacturing and Quality Management (2-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

For AAAP program students. This course provides the student with knowledge and application of integrated management control processes with regard to performance, cost, and schedule, while examining higher-level and real world defense systems. Issue-oriented topic areas likely to affect Program Management Office personnel include: acquisition reform; acquisition strategy; industrial base; production and manufacturing; quality management; and risk management. Integrative case studies involving managerial problem solving and decision making in the PMO environment are also used to provide application of concepts in both IPT teaming and multiple-role individual settings. Teamwork exercises are conducted to reinforce concepts and add real-world human dynamics. Upon completion, all exercises are evaluated. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

MN3364 Business Financial and Contract Management (2-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Advanced Acquisition Program. The course builds on the student's knowledge and experience in contracting, and contracting related fields, to address the more complex pre-award, award and post-award issues in the acquisition and contracting, and business and financial management arenas. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

MN3365 Acquisition Logistics & Program Sustainment (2-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Advanced Acquisition Program. This course focuses on the logistics and sustainability planning for new major weapon systems in each phase of the DoD acquisition process. It links logistics and sustainability planning, in the early stages of system development, to the effects on the system's total ownership cost. The course describes sustainability planning and management through the Systems Engineering Process and supportability analyses techniques. The course addresses the following specific subject areas: Designing for Life Cycle Cost and Cost As an Independent Variable (CAIV); Logistics Supportability Elements; Supportability analyses; Logistics Open Systems; Software Support Planning; Supply Chain Management; and Post-Production Support Planning. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

MN3370 Seminar on Leadership in Supply Chain Management (0-2) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Graduate-level seminar emphasizing current and emerging issues from a broad range of logistics and supply chain management subjects. Speakers from the Department of Defense, other government agencies, and industry. Graded on Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MN3384 Principles of Acquisition Production and Quality Management (4-1) Fall/Spring

This course provides the student with an understanding of the principles and concepts of production and quality management in the DoD acquisition environment. Topics include production planning and control, "lean" production, and bottleneck analysis; quality management systems, statistical process control, and six sigma; cost estimating methods, activity based costing, and progress payments in support of production; producibility; environmental, safety and occupational health; warranties; specs and standards reform; and the Defense industrial base. Prerequisite: MN3331 or MN3221 / MN3222 or MN3302 or consent of instructor.

MN3392 Systems and Project Management (4-0) Summer

Management ensures progress toward objectives, proper deployment and conservation of human and financial resources, and achievement of cost and schedule targets. Topics include strategic project management, project and organizational learning, lean thinking, cost, schedule planning and control, structuring of performance measures and metrics, technical teaming and project management, information technology support, risk management, and process control. Course delivery consists of lectures, speakers, case studies, and experience sharing, and reinforces collaborative project-based learning and continuous improvement. Prerequisite: MN3108.

MN3402 Seminar in Installation Management I (0-2) As Required

Introduces students to a variety of topics associated with the management of a complex military base installation. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MN3411 System of Systems Program Definition and Concept Development (3-2) Fall

Same as SE3411. Managing the integration of Large System of Systems (SoS) through a Lead Systems Integrator brings together all developers through a single, central point of communication and control to direct work activities, plan for SoS integration, organize for effective scheduling, and build the team's commitment to successful integration and interoperability. SoS integration often poses confounding problems due to the myriad of interactions between systems and the overall meta-system. This course discusses the special problems of managing the integration of system of systems. Topics include the characteristics of the large scale SoS, program management of SoS integration, uses of SoS design and architecture for decision analysis, feasibility analysis and approaches for SoS integration, SoS contract management, and execution for SoS acquisitions. Prerequisite: A strong background in systems engineering or approval by instructor.

MN3412 System of Systems Design and Development (3-2) Winter

Same as SE3412. This course discusses the special problems of managing and engineering system of systems from the LSI perspective. Topics include characteristics of SoS in the LSI management environment, engineering implications of SoS issues, management and engineering methodology of SoS, SoS architecture, analysis of SoS, and tools for engineering and monitoring SoS. Managing the integration of SoS through an LSI requires attention to the meta-systems implications of changes at the systems level. This course discusses the special problems of managing the integration of system of systems from the LSI perspective. Topics from the LSI perspective include the characteristics of the large scale SoS, program management of SoS integration, uses of SoS design and architecture for decision analysis, feasibility analysis and approaches for SoS integration, SoS contract management, and execution for SoS acquisitions. Prerequisite: MN3411.

MN3413 System of Systems Integration, Qualification and Lifecycle (3-2) Spring

Same as SE3413. This course discusses these special problems of managing and engineering system of systems from the LSI perspective. Topics include complexity theory in program management (PM), integrated risk management, SoS program assessment strategy, SoS governance, SoS integration design & considerations, SoS performance analysis, SoS leading indicators and reference model strategy. Prerequisite: MN3411 and MN3412.

MN3420 Supply Chain Management (3-0) As Required

This course is designed to provide an introduction to supply chain management (SCM). A supply chain is a network of organizations that supply and transform materials, and distribute final products to customers. Supply chain management is a broadly defined term for the analysis and improvement of flows of material, information, and money through this network of suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and customers. The objective of SCM is to deliver the right product to the right customer at the right time. SCM emphasizes inventory-service level tradeoffs across the chain of players that, together, provide the product to a customer. Logistics has traditionally focused on materials issues within and downstream from the factory while SCM looks at the entire network of players, both up and down stream, and perhaps has more of an emphasis on information flows through the network. Logistics has traditionally been considered a more tactical topic while SCM has risen to prominence in recent years, attracting high-level attention. Ultimately, logistics and SCM activities are concerned with coordinating demand and supply. Common elements in that coordination are the management of materials (inventories), the location of materials (warehouses), and the movement of materials (transportation). As part of the coordination, an analyst must consider product and process designs as well as information flows between various players in the networks. These elements will form the basis of this course. This course is the Distance Learning version of GB4480. Prerequisites: MN3042, MN4043.

MN3510  Defense Financial Management Practice (3-0) Fall/Spring

This distance learning course is designed for MBA students and presumes the student has a foundation including the PPBE system and Congressional Authorization and Appropriation processes. This course concentrates on financial management practices within DoD as distinct from policy and budgeting theory. The course covers the actors and activities and mechanics of building and defending budgets. It covers funding mechanisms for programs and activities, addressing the proper use and management of appropriated, reimbursable, and revolving funds. Basic principles of fiscal law are explored. It then addresses financial management and stewardship topics including budgetary accounting, management of cost drivers, the relationship between comptrollership and contracting, and internal controls. Contemporary financial management issues are discussed. Exercises and case studies are used to develop the students' ability to apply financial management concepts to real life situations.  Prerequisite: None.

<MN3760 - MN4091 Courses>

MN3760 Manpower Economics I (4-0) As Required

An introduction to the theoretical aspects of labor economics. Concepts covered include the supply of labor, the demand for labor, wage determination, internal labor markets, human capital, earnings functions, turnover, compensation systems, and compensating wage differentials. Special readings are used that apply the principles to military manpower. Prerequisites: GB3040, GB4071.

MN3810 Fundamental Issues in Energy Technology Adoption (4-0) Winter

This course is designed to cater to all NPS energy curric students who need to know something about how the great new technologies, ideas and practices they research and talk about in other classes might actually get adopted by some DoD entity, and how to get them adopted. It is also appropriate for any other NPS students who would like to learn about some of the basic issues in technology adoption, and don't mind learning it mainly through energy related

examples.

MN3900 Readings In System Management (V-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

An individualized program of readings and study in some area of the systems management, designed to meet the student's special educational needs. Prerequisites: A background in the area of study and departmental approval; graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

MN4043 Business Modeling and Analysis (3-0) As Required

This course introduces mathematical modeling for a sound conceptual understanding of the decision-making process. This course familiarizes the students with applications, assumptions, and limitations of the quantitative methods in modeling. It focuses on the development of mathematical and spreadsheet models, the verification of those models, sensitivity analysis of the solutions generated from a model, and the implementation of those solutions. Some of the topics covered include linear programming, non-linear and integer programming, simulation, and forecasting. The process of modeling and particular modeling tools are applied to business problems in finance, acquisition, logistics and manpower planning. This course is the Distance Learning version of GB4043. Prerequisites: None.

MN4053  Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy (4-0) Winter/Summer

This distance learning course analyzes the resource requirements process within the Department of Defense (DoD) and in the executive and legislative branches of the federal government. It begins with a summary of the current threat situation and potential changes to it.  Once the threat is defined, the study of the resource allocation process to meet the threat begins.  The course covers the resource planning and budgeting processes of the Department of the Navy, DoD and the federal government. It includes the politics of executive and congressional budgeting, and DoD budget and financial management processes and procedures including budget formulation and execution. It also includes analysis of the Planning, Programming, Budgeting Execution System (PPBES) used by DoD to plan, budget and implement national defense resource management policy and programs. Other areas included are budget process and fiscal policy reform and the dynamics of internal DoD competition for resources. Executive and congressional budget processes are assessed to indicate how national security policy is resourced and implemented through the budget process. Spending for national security policy is tracked from budget submission through resolution, authorization and appropriation. Budget formulation, negotiation, and execution strategies are evaluated to indicate the dynamics of executive-legislative competition over resource allocation priorities. Supplemental appropriation patterns and current year budget execution patterns and problems are also considered.  Prerequisite: None.

MN4090 Joint Applied Project I (2-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Course reflects laboratory hours dedicated to presenting research techniques and independent/team efforts needed to conduct Joint Applied Project research and analysis and to produce the Professional Report. These laboratory hours will be used by students and student teams for interactions with their Joint Applied Project advisors, Academic Associate(s), editors, and thesis processors in producing high quality, disciplined research products for publication as appropriate. Prerequisite: None.

MN4091 Joint Applied Project II (2-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Intended to help students attack unstructured managerial problems. Student teams must determine the organizational objective and identify what the underlying issues are; and determine the most appropriate tools from the curriculum to apply in order to provide insight into these issues; and recommend appropriate courses of action. Graded course. Prerequisite: None.

<MN4104 - MN4123 Courses>

MN4104 Strategic Management Issues In Military Organizations (3-0) As Required

Examination of strategic management from the perspective of leadership in military education and training organizations. This course explores strategic planning, policy formulation, and organizational adaptation with a dual emphasis on understanding the concepts as well as acquiring the ability to isolate and communicate concepts relevant to developing subordinates. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

MN4105 Strategic Management (3-0) As Required

Strategic Management entails the establishment of an organization's direction and the implementation and evaluation of that direction given the organization's external environment and its internal capabilities. The principal aim of this course is the transfer and adaptation of the principles of business strategic management to the Department of Defense and other federal agencies. In previous courses, students concentrate on the functional elements of management (e.g., accounting, finance, acquisition, logistics, contracting, etc.). This course addresses the challenges of setting direction and implementing strategies for the total system or whole organization. Cases and approaches from the public and private sectors enable students to develop the knowledge, skills, and abilities to strategically think, plan, and manage. Prerequisites: MN3012.

MN4106 Manpower / Personnel Policy Analysis (4-0) Summer

Study and analysis of military manpower / personnel policy alternatives with emphasis on identifying the trade-offs involved, the dynamic impact of major policy decisions and the short-term and long-term consequences of decisions. Review, use and evaluation of tools to aid in selecting policy alternatives. Analysis of issues in the DoD and military services. Prerequisites: MN3760, MN4111.

MN4107 Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course introduces you to System Dynamics modeling for the analysis of organizational policy and strategy. You will learn to visualize an organization in terms of the structures and policies that create dynamics and regulate performance. The goal is to use the analysis and modeling techniques of System Dynamics to improve understanding of how complex organizational structures drive organizational performance, and then to use that understanding to design high leverage interventions to achieve organizational goals. We use role-playing games and computer-based simulations called “microworlds,” where space and time can be compressed, slowed, and stopped so we can experience the long-term side effects of decisions, systematically explore new strategies, and develop our understanding of complex systems (analogous to the “flight simulators” that pilots use to learn about the dynamics of flying an aircraft). The course presents system dynamics with a minimum of mathematical formalism. The goal is to develop the students' intuition and conceptual understanding, without sacrificing the rigor of the scientific method. (No prior computer modeling experience is needed.) Prerequisite: None.

MN4110 Multivariate Manpower Data Analysis I (4-1) Winter

An introduction to multivariate data analysis. This section will focus on the tools necessary to perform data analysis. The primary goal of this course is to introduce multiple linear regression models. The second goal involves making correct inferences and interpretations of the findings. Special topics include hypothesis testing, model specification issues, multicollinearity, dummy variables, and research methodology. Prerequisite: GB3040 or consent of instructor.

MN4111 Multivariate Manpower Data Analysis II (4-1) Spring

An introduction to the specialized multivariate techniques used for analysis of military manpower data. Topics include advanced linear estimation techniques, such as panel data analysis and two-stage models. In addition, nonlinear methods are introduced, such as binary choice models and survival analysis. The course also covers special techniques for policy evaluation and reduction of estimation bias due to omitted variables or sample selection. Students apply techniques to manpower databases. Prerequisite: MN4110, or consent of instructor.

MN4114 Sociological and Psychological Perspectives on Military Service (4-0) Winter

Exploration of the concepts, theories, and methods of military sociology and military psychology as applied historically and in the current setting. Study of the military as a social institution, focusing on the internal organization and practices of the armed forces as well as the relationship between the military and society. Review and evaluation of the psychological principles employed in a variety of military areas such as health care, selection and job classification, human factors, organizational systems, personnel security, and performance appraisal. Emphasis on representative cases in DoD and the armed forces. Prerequisite: GB3010.

MN4115 Foundations of Education and Learning in DoD Organizations (4-0) Fall

Analysis of issues in DoD education, learning and training (ELT). Major course themes focus on understanding adult military ELT from a strategic systems perspective; analyzing instructional program design, implementation, and technologies and applying methods of needs analysis and program evaluation. Examination of how DoD can become a learning organization to respond to the dynamic demands of both the organization and its military members. Guest speakers, military publications, student cases, and discussion based on the experience of the instructor and the students are utilized to maintain the necessary focus on current military applications. Prerequisite: GB3010.

MN4116 Society of Human Resource Management (0-3) Fall/Spring

This course prepares students for taking the Human Resource Certification Institute (HRCI) certification examination. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the MSA curriculum and consent of instructor.

MN4118 Modeling for Decision Support in Manpower Systems (3-2) Fall/Spring

An introduction to applied manpower models and modeling techniques. Students will gain insight into how models are used by policy makers in the decision process and into the complexity of the military manpower system. Several models that are currently used by the Bureau of Naval Personnel and Headquarters USMC will be analyzed, including accession planning, sea-shore rotation policy, promotion planning and inventory projection models. Other topics covered include the manpower planning process, types of models, model evaluation and good modeling practices. Prerequisites: GB3040, GB4043, OS4701 (may be taken concurrently).

MN4119 Navy Manpower Requirements Process (3-0) Summer

An in-depth analysis of fleet and shore unit Manpower requirements and personnel documents. The course will cover the determination and validation of fleet requirements as they pertain to an operational unit's Required Operational Capabilities and Projected Operational Environment and the resulting Ship Manpower Document (SMD), Squadron Manpower Document (SQMD), and Fleet Manpower Document (FMD); and how the Shore Manpower Requirements Determination Process (SMRDP) links the Mission, Function and Task statement to the resulting Statement of Manpower Requirements (SMR). The course covers how fleet and shore manpower documents link with the Activity Manpower Document (AMD). The Personnel sub-process will be studied as it relates to the Enlisted Distribution and Verification Report (EDVR) in support of fleet readiness. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the MSA curriculum and consent of instructor.

MN4123 Organizing and Planning In Complex Networks (4-0) Summer

In 21st century operational and policy settings, people are expected to work in networks to get things done. Operating beyond the boundaries of any one organization in an inter-organizational domain, network members are called upon to join forces and work collaboratively with others. Network collaborations are difficult, however, because they challenge traditional management assumptions. Members must coordinate without hierarchy, lead without formal authority, and solve problems and make decisions without someone being "in control:" or "in charge." This course provides the basic knowledge, skills, and abilities to enable students to work collectively in networks, especially those with members who come from different cultural, ethnic and national organizations. With the use of cases, experiential exercises, and simulations, students learn how to craft and execute collaborative strategies to improve network performance. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

<MN4125 - MN4157 Courses>

MN4125 Managing Planned Change in Complex Organizations (4-0) Spring

Examination of the approaches to planning and managing change efforts in complex social systems made up of the interdependent components of technology, structure, task, and people; and of the role of the manager or staff specialist; and the process of helping. Emphasis is placed on strategies and technologies for diagnosis and planning aimed at effective implementation. Course provides opportunities for practice using both simulations and actual organizational cases. Particular emphasis is placed on the DoD/ DoN organizations and the special problems they have in bringing about change.

MN4130 Marine Manpower Management (3-0) Summer

Upon completion of this course, the student will have an in-depth understanding of USMC Manpower Management and implementation of management policy techniques through analysis, procedures, organizational and administrative actions to better staff Headquarters Marine Corp management policy issues. USMC officers will gain insight into management actions that support budget requirement requests and the resource allocation efforts subsequent to budget approval. Each officer will develop an understanding of the relationship between the Table of Organization (T/O), Troop List (TL) and the Authorized Strength Report (ASR). Each officer will complete an UNS report. Graded (3-0). Prerequisite: MN2111 or consent of instructor.

MN4145 Policy Analysis (4-0) Fall/Spring

Develops the tools and techniques of economic efficiency to assist public sector decision makers in analyzing resource allocation in government activities. Focuses on developing the principles of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA). Stresses the application of CBA and CEA to specific investment projects, programs, and policies in the federal government, especially in the Department of Defense. Prerequisites: MN3161 and OS3101 or equivalent.

MN4157 Seminar in Management Accounting I (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course complements the financial management program by covering significant topics not otherwise included in the program to prepare students to obtain the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) and/or Certified in Financial Management (CFM) designation. This course covers topics in business analysis, corporate financial management, management accounting and reporting, and strategic management. This course reviews, in more depth, topics covered in the introductory financial and cost management course. Specific topics addressed in the course may vary. Prerequisite: GB3050 and GB3051.

<MN4304 - MN4379 Courses>

MN4304 Defense Systems Contracting (2-0) Winter/Summer

This course is the study of the DoD's major systems contracting policies, processes, procedures, and practices. A review of major systems acquisition and program management is provided but the primary focus is on the contracting process used to acquire defense systems for the various services. The topics covered include: acquisition environment, acquisition strategy, source selection, incentive contracting, alpha contracting, multi-year procurement, and requirement/capability specifications. Prerequisites: MN3331 or MN3222.

MN4307 Program Management Policy and Control (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course provides the student with knowledge and understanding of major systems management control processes and tools, application of program management control systems and the use of computer-based management information systems with strategic media choices so as to develop effective media campaigns, interact effectively with the print and broadcast news media, and handle press conferences and similar media events. Particular attention is focused on anticipating and handling crisis communication. Specifically, students will learn to organize crisis management teams, develop crisis management plans, and create communication plans to manage information and public perception.  Case studies involving program management problem solving and decision making in the acquisition environment are used. Prerequisite: MN3331 or MN3392, MN3303, MN3155 (or GB4053 or MN3364), MN4470 (or GB4450 or MN3365), MN3384 (or MN3363), MN3309 (or MN3361), and MN4602 (or MN3362).

MN4308 Field Contract Management (2-0) As Required

Examines procurement at the installation and center level. Emphasis is on (1) simplified acquisition procedures, (2) contracts for other than major systems, (3) services contracting, and (4) contracting for information technology resources. Prerequisite: MN4473 or consent of instructor.

MN4310 Logistics Engineering (4-0) Fall/Spring

The concept of integrated logistics support in the design and maintenance of weapon systems. Operational requirements, system maintenance concept, functional analysis, life cycle costs, logistics support analysis, systems design, test and evaluation, production, spare/repair parts management are discussed. This course also covers topics in logistics information technology, inventory management culture and commercial-sector best practices for military. Case studies include logistics life cycle cost, reliability and readiness analysis for major weapon systems Prerequisite: GB4043, OS3006, (both may be taken concurrently).

MN4311 Contracting for Services (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course studies the DoD's major services contracting policies, processes, procedures, and practices. Detailed and critical examination of current policies, issues, and practices in services contracting, to include performance based services contracting (PBSC), is accomplished through extensive case, policy, and report analysis requiring synthesis of concepts, processes and best practices. A review of major services acquisition and program management is provided but the primary focus is on the contracting process used to acquire major services for the DoD. Topics include: information technology services, base operating support services, environmental services, construction services, and contractor logistics support. Prerequisites: MN3331 and MN3303 or by permission of the instructor.

MN4366 Program Management and Leadership (4-0) Summer

This course provides the student with knowledge and understanding of major systems management control processes and tools, application of program management control systems and the use of computer-based management information systems with strategic media choices so as to develop effective media campaigns, interact effectively with the print and broadcast news media, and handle press conferences and similar media events. Particular attention is focused on anticipating and handling crisis communication. Specifically, students will learn to organize crisis management teams, develop crisis management plans, and create communication plans to manage information and public perception.  Case studies involving program management problem solving and decision making in the acquisition environment are used. Prerequisites: MN3331 or MN3109/MN3392, MN3303 (or MN3371), MN3155 (or GB4053 or MN3364), MN4470 (or GB4450 or MN3365), MN3384 (or MN3363), MN3309 (or MN3361), and MN4602 (or MN3362).

MN4371 Acquisition and Contracting Policy (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course uses case studies and current acquisition issues to analyze government and business acquisition/contracting policies. Emphasis is on acquisition decision making and policy formulation/execution. Prerequisites: MN3304, MN3320 and MN3312 (or equivalent)

MN4374 Seminar In Acquisition Management: Strategic Purchasing (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course is a graduate-level seminar in strategic purchasing. The primary purpose and objective of MN4374 is to provide the student with an opportunity to review and analyze the concepts and disciplines of strategic purchasing, to demonstrate critical analysis and thinking skills in applying strategic purchasing management and execution to make DoD and other agencies “world-class” buying organizations. A second purpose is to investigate the specific topics, concepts and theories that are projected to be of high interest to DoD acquisition activities of the future. The course is divided into three components. The MN4374 course includes 15 blocks of instruction, focusing on those areas of the world-recognized Institute for Supply Management as world-class business practices for progressive purchasing. Specific cases and in-class “exams” are designed to reinforce class readings and discussions. The course is designed to capitalize on the foundations provided by MN3303, MN3306, and MN3307. Critical thinking and analytical skills are developed in designing and executing the most efficient and effective purchasing organizations and associated business processes. Prerequisite: None

MN4379 Operations Management (4-0) Winter

This course introduces students to problems and analysis related to the design, planning, control, and improvement of manufacturing and service operations. It will extensively utilize case studies and analytical problem sets. Topics include operations strategy, process analysis, project analysis, materials management, production planning and scheduling, quality management, computer-aided manufacturing, capacity and facilities planning, and theory of constraints applied to product development. The course will equip students with the basic tools and techniques used in analyzing operations, as well as the strategic context for making operational decisions. Prerequisites: MN3108, MN3117, and OS3211, or consent of instructor.

<MN4414 - MN4999 Courses>

MN4414 LSI - Leadership in System Integration (4-0) Summer

Same as SE4414. Most major DoD acquisition activities are not the development of new systems but the improvement and integration of existing legacy systems. Furthermore, this acquisition activity is made exceptionally complex because the systems need to be integrated with a "Systems-of-Systems" (SoS) approach. SoS acquisition, development, and integration require skills in system integration that exceed those required with standalone system acquisition. These skills are embodied in the role of the "Lead System Integrator" (LSI), previously a contractor, but increasingly a DoD employee. In this course we examine the roles of the LSI, where DoD acquisition skills may need to be strengthened to perform as the LSI, and discuss methods and tools to do so. This course is a capstone to MN3411, MN3412, and MN3413.

MN4450 Logistics Strategy (3-0) As Required

DAU Equiv: LOG 304. This is the logistics capstone course. The course explores and analyzes the concepts, processes and methods of strategic planning and execution, emphasizing aggressive proactive techniques to ensure maximum logistics influence on major weapon systems acquisition as well as optimum life cycle management of fielded systems. Cultural constraints of the current logistics environment and how to succeed in it is a significant focus of the course. The course examines and analyzes key opportunities for maximum logistics influence in requirements, development, contracting, test and evaluation, reliability, and maintainability as well as financial management and communications. The course features logistics management relevance to service roles and missions. It employs lectures, guided discussions, case studies, role-playing, panel discussions, and lessons learned in the DoD acquisition environment. For the final examination project, the class is divided into teams and produces a comprehensive strategic plan for logistics for a fictitious major program. This course is the Distance Learning version of GB4450. Prerequisite: MN4410.

MN4470 Strategic Planning and Policy for The Logistic Manager (4-0) Winter/Summer

The course explores and analyzes the concepts, processes and methods of strategic logistics planning and execution, emphasizing proactive techniques to ensure maximum logistics influence on major weapon systems acquisition as well as optimum life cycle management of fielded systems. The course will examine and analyze key opportunities for maximum logistics influence in requirements development, contracting, test and evaluation, reliability and maintainability, as well as financial management and communications. The course will feature logistics management relevance to service roles and missions. The course will employ lectures, guided discussions, case studies, role-playing, panel discussions and lessons learned in the DoD acquisition environment. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be awarded a DAWIA (Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act) Level III certificate for Acquisition Logistics. Prerequisite: GB4410 or consent of instructor.

MN4473 Strategic Acquisition and Contract Management (4-1) As Required

Tailored toward the students in the class, the course examines the unique contracting issues/problems encountered in a variety of organizational situations. Analysis, discussion and potential resolution of actual working problems are undertaken. A comprehensive written case study is the capstone effort in the course for each student. Students will be grouped into teams simulating integrated product team (IPT) organization to address various issues germane to the students' organizations. Prerequisite: MN3342.

MN4474 Organizational Analysis (2-0) As Required

This course concentrates on analysis of acquisition organizations from an open systems perspective. Focus is on tools and techniques for diagnosing managerial problems by analyzing structure, task requirements, technology, culture, and various organizational subsystems. The course emphasizes application in that students complete a course project requiring integrated application of the systems model in an analysis of their own acquisition organization. Prerequisite: none.

MN4602 Test and Evaluation Management (2-2) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Designed to cover Developmental, Operational and Joint Test and Evaluation, including planning concepts and procedures frequently used in test and evaluation programs. Taught from the perspective of the Program Manager, Test Project Officer and Test Engineer. Actual military cases are used for examples. Topics include the role of Test and Evaluation in Systems Engineering and Acquisition Management, DT and OT test planning, introduction to test design, conduct of tests, live fire testing, modeling and simulation, human systems integration (HIS), reporting of test results, range and resource issues, and lessons learned. Student teams will write a detailed test plan. Prerequisite: MN3302.

MN4760 Manpower Economics I ( 4-0 ) Spring

An introduction to the theoretical aspects of labor economics. Concepts covered include the supply of labor, the demand for labor, wage determination, internal labor markets, human capital, earnings functions, turnover, compensation systems, and compensating wage differentials. Special readings are used that apply the principles to military manpower. Prerequisite: None.

MN4761 Applied Manpower Analysis (4-0) Summer

Application of theoretical models and quantitative techniques to Navy and DoD manpower, personnel, and training issues. Topics include application of cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis techniques to manpower policies, manpower supply models, attrition and reenlistment models, force structure analysis, manpower productivity, and compensation systems. Course uses specialized readings in DoD and Navy manpower. Prerequisites: MN3760 and MN4111.

MN4790 Managing Diversity (4-0) Spring

This is an experiential course developing awareness, understanding, and leadership action for managing diversity and inclusion in the uniform and civilian military. The course explores social constructs of gender, race, class, and culture; builds personal, leadership, and organizational skills for addressing diversity and inclusion issues; and develops the competency of leaders to respond effectively to the opportunities and the challenges posed by the increasing presence of diversity in the military. The objective of managing inclusion is to maximize the organization's performance through understanding, valuing, and leveraging diversity both in the workplace and in the customer base. Managing diversity competency is developed through personal and organizational introspection and change. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: None.

MN4900 Readings in Management (V-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

An individualized program of advanced readings and study in some area of Systems Management. Prerequisites: A background of advanced work in the area of study and departmental approval. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

MN4970 Seminar in Systems Management (V-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Study of a variety of topics of general interest in the systems management, to be determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: A background in systems management and consent of instructor.

MN4999 Elective (4-0) As Required

Course elective.

PD Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<PD0810 Course>

PD0810 Thesis Research (0-8) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Thesis research for PD21 students.

Global Public Policy Academic Group

Chairman (Interim)

Robert McNab

Associate Professor

Halligan Hall Room 233

831-656-3132

DSN 756-2306

rmmcnab@nps.edu

Associate Chair

Frank Barrett

Professor

Ingersoll Hall Room 240

831-656-2328

DSN 756-2328

fbarrett@nps.edu

Dr. Margalynne Armstrong, Visiting Associate Professor (Santa Clara Law).

Mie Augier, Associate Professor, Ph.D., Copenhagen Business School, 2001.

Frank J. Barrett, Professor, Ph.D., Case Western, 1990.

Walter Christman, Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Geneva, 2007.

Karen Guttieri, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 1999.

Robert Looney, Professor, Ph.D., University of California, Davis.

George Lucas, Professor, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1978.

Robert M. McNab, Associate Professor, Ph.D., Georgia State University, 2001.

Paula Philbin, Senior Lecturer.

Maria Pineda, Visiting Professor (UCLA).

Anke Richter, Academic Associate, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1996.

Marc Ventresca, Associate Professor.

Brief Overview

The Global Public Policy Academic Group was established by the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), 1 January 2009, as an inter-disciplinary group to study the national security implications of globalization. The group conducts research and develops research-led educational programs. By broadening the understanding of the forces of globalization and their potential impact on U.S. national security policy, NPS endeavors to not only inform, but to also shape, national policy. On 1 October 2012, GPPAG moved to become an academic group within the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy.

A core competency of NPS is the linking of traditional disciplines to national security and defense applications. NPS faculty provide a wide-range of relevant expertise on leadership, program management, economic development, strategy and planning, cross-cultural communications, conflict resolution, metrics, organizational learning and other relevant subjects. A core mission of the Naval Postgraduate School is to prepare security practitioners for the emerging security environment.

Program Development

In support of the National Security Strategy of the United States, the National Defense Strategy, the National Strategy for Homeland Defense, and the Navy's Maritime Strategy, the GPPAG develops a broad-based, interdisciplinary research program to investigate the interaction of globalization and national security.  GPPAG faculty conduct research on global governance and development, new security economics, rule of law, and fiscal decentralization.  These research efforts directly influence the development of graduate curricula in GPPAG in support of the Department of Defense.  The GPPAG continues to deliver graduate certificates on Security, Stability, and Development in Complex Operations and the Rule of Law, with the objective of providing non-traditional students a path towards a Masters in Global Public Policy.

Certificate in Stability, Security and Development in Complex Operations - Curriculum 210

Program Director

Karen Guttieri, Ph.D.

Quarters E Building 279

guttieri@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The purpose of the program is to provide a professional education program to the civil affairs community focusing on the relevant, requisite skills identified by the Department of Defense, as necessary for implementing Irregular Warfare, on a global scale. NPS faculty have studied post-9/11 shifts in operational environments and adaptations in the various CA doctrines, force structure, training and deployments. This program develops a conceptual framework for analyzing key civil affairs and psychological operations and provides graduate level education to participants in order to enhance their effectiveness as they plan and execute complex operations. The program aims to capture civil affairs and psychological operations operational and tactical innovations, and resulting lessons.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is desired. An academic profile code of 365 is required.

Program Length

Fall SSDCO

DL: 15 Oct–24 Nov

IR: 27 Nov–21 Dec

Winter SSDCO

DL: 14 Jan–23 Feb

IR: 25 Feb–22 Mar

Spring ROL

DL: 1 Apr–11 May

IR: 13 May–31 May

Summer SSDCO

DL: 24 Jun–3 Aug

IR: 5 Aug–30 Aug

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the Certificate in Stability, Security, and Development in Complex Operations are met by successful completion of all three courses. 

Program Phases

The Security, Stability and Development in Complex Operations (SSDCO) Certificate Program consists of three courses delivered in hybrid residence status.

Phase one of the certificate involves distance learning over a three to four week period.

Phase two entail four weeks of intensive in-residence coursework.

Phase three of the certificate includes three to four weeks of distance learning to complete required coursework for course grade (as opposed to a pass/fail).

The program content and projects challenges the student academically and addresses problems of interest to the DoD with specific emphasis on the challenges of civil-military relations and human dynamics.

Required Courses

GP3100

(4-0)

Global Change and International Governance

GP3200

(4-0)

Security and Development

GP3300

(4-0)

Introduction to Analytic Methods

Certificate in Civil Military Operations and the Rule of Law (Res & DL) - Curriculum 215

Program Director

Karen Guttieri, Ph.D.

Quarters E Building 279

guttieri@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Well-functioning justice institutions and government bound by the rule of law are vital to security and development. America’s interest in the rule of law abroad is expressed in the 2010 US National Security Strategy, calling for the US to "improve its capability to strengthen the security of states at risk of conflict and violence," including internal, external, and regional security, "respect for human rights and the rule of law" and "administrative and oversight capability of civilian security sector institutions, and the effectiveness of criminal justice." The 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review calls Civil Affairs "the vanguard" of Defense Department support to US government agency assistance to partner nations in the rule of law.

The goal of this certificate program is to provide Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations, and related rule of law practitioners with the knowledge and skills needed in order to provide effective support to rule of law missions in a variety of operational environments, from conflict prevention to post-conflict stabilization.  The three courses comprising the program are integrated in order to educate students on the rule of law at all levels, including international conventions, national and regional rule of law systems, and local governance and traditional rule of law mechanisms. 

Civil Military Operations and the Rule of Law is a graduate certificate that complements the NPS program Stability, Security and Development in Complex Operations (SSDCO). These hybrid distributed/in-residence program are particularly tailored to the needs of Reserve personnel.

Requirements for Entry

Applicants for the CMO and Rule of Law program must have an earned bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited academic institution, and in the absence of a waiver, the NPS certificate in Stability, Security and Development in Complex Operations (SSDCO). While GPPAG will accept applications from virtually all undergraduate major fields, admissions decisions will primarily be based on adequate performance in social science and humanities classes. The program is sponsored by the United States Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command.  We welcome related rule of law practitioners on a space-available basis.

Program Length

One Quarter

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the Certificate in Civil Military Operations and the Rule of Law are met by successful completion of all three courses.

Program Phases

Distributed learning: Ap. 1 - May 11

In-residence: May 13-31

Required Courses

GP3110

(4-0)

Legitimacy, Law and Society

GP3210

(4-0)

Comparative Legal Systems

GP3310

(4-0)

Public Order and Accountability

Note: Courses are taken concurrently.

<GP3100 - GP4800 Courses>

GP3100 Global Change and International Governance (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course addresses principles that drive globalization and how and where the military and civilians address the civil dimension in pre-conflict, conflict, and post-conflict environments. Theories of regional economic development, location and trade are applied to the contemporary process known as "globalization" and used to decipher its effects on regional and national patterns of development, employment, income distribution, political institutions, and policymaking. Specific topics of discussion are: globalization and the production of risks, climate and environmental change, division of labor, power and governance, regional and international development, risks as drivers of change, financial and information flows, and capitalism and globalization.

GP3110 Legitimacy, Law, and Society (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course investigates the role of legitimacy in governance systems, including the rules, norms and social processes that shape and legitimate political order. We address the legality of war (jus ad bellum) in so far as it affects the legitimacy of political orders that follow it. The focus in this course is upon the rules that apply in the midst of war or occupation (jus in bello)and the processes of transition through interim to more durable regimes after conflict. We will consider the institutional and social context for governance, including the role of social movements and media in the development of legitimate political order under rule of law. The class will draw upon case studies of real-world scenarios. The discussion of legal issues in this course is part of a broader conversation on reconciliation and the rule of law. Significant actors in this space include the United Nations and other international regimes, civil society, national-level public officials, and the military. Students will learn about legal definitions, frameworks, and international assistance efforts. Prerequisites: none.

GP3200 Security and Development (4-0) Winter/Summer

Complex security challenges including state failure, transnational terrorism, energy crisis and pandemics compel us to think about prevention and stability operations in new ways. The course seeks to develop analytic skills and empirical knowledge needed to assess requirements and capacities for stability, security and development, and to develop strategies for peace building. Students will gain expertise relevant to preventive engagement and counterinsurgency, and especially to civil-military operations such as humanitarian relief, peace and stability operations abroad and homeland security efforts at home. Specific areas of concentration are: stability in the global context, theories and strategies, implementation challenges, and practical applications.

GP3210 Comparative Legal Systems (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Comparative law is the study of alternative legal systems. In the context of Civil Military Operations knowledge of the legal traditions of the host country is necessary to the process of helping to reestablish or support a culture of lawfulness. An understanding of host country legal traditions and resources contributes to the cultural competence of successful graduates and an ability to support rule of law systems that are perceived as fair and acceptable to the host country population. Today, the issues of how systems and institutions interact with legitimacy and perceptions are critical for Civil Affairs policy and work in the field. The Rule of Law certificate underscores this with the substantive contents in the two other courses. The Comparative Legal Systems course engages your knowledge and learning from those courses through the focused look at legal traditions on the books and in practice in different countries. To reinforce the link between theory and application, this course also introduces principles and precepts of dispute resolution and organizational design, to provide context for the analysis of comparative legal systems and recognition of challenges and opportunities Civil Affairs practitioners will face. This further content addresses the cultural competence of graduates and leverages their prior knowledge of organizational and institutional design – emphasizing the importance of institutional and well as individual ‘capacity’ to work within different legal system contexts.

GP3300 Introduction to Analytic Methods (4-0) Winter/Summer

GP3300 focuses on the use of analytical decision making techniques in the support of stability operations. The first part of the course focuses on the framework for analytical decision-making and accurate costing of projects. The second part of the course discusses multi-objective decision-making. In the final part of the course, we will discuss risk and the economics of stability operations.

GP3310 Public Order and Accountability (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course surveys the role of and need for legal institutions to provide the physical security necessary for reconstructing society as well as rebuilding/creating state legitimacy. The concept of justice is central to this process, as is creating a robust and fair justice sector. Most practitioners have come to realize that it is impossible to address the problems arising from conflict without addressing the interrelationships between security, development and politics. We examine these with an eye to the practical applications for the Civil Affairs community. We will discuss the challenge of operationalizing legal concepts and norms, and introducing Rule of Law into countries that have no prior concept of the role of legal and security institutions as protectors of and servants to the people, and courts as neutral arbitrators of the law. The class will tackle the subjects of torture, truth and reconciliations structures, the Geneva Protocols, and war crimes, as well as the role of civilian policing in conflict zones. We will also tackle the issue of privatizing roles and functions in conflict areas, and the problems of corruption and organized crime. The class will draw upon case studies of real-world scenarios from Nuremberg, Abu Gharaf, Guantanamo, and South Africa. We will discuss the key actors involved in the Rule of law process: NGOs, the United Nations, the State Department, NATO, and regional organizations.

GP4800 Directed Studies in Global Public Policy (V-V) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Format and content vary. Normally involves extensive assigned readings, individual discussions with the instructor, papers and/or examinations. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Defense Resources Management Institute (DRMI)

Website

www.nps.edu/drmi

Executive Director

Francois Melese, Ph.D.

Code DRMI, Halligan Hall, Room M4

(831) 229-3179

FAX (831) 656-2139

fmelese@nps.edu

Overview

DRMI conducts professional education programs in analytical decision making and resources management for military officers of all services, and senior civilian officials of the United States and over 165 other countries. Established in 1965 by the Secretary of Defense as an educational institution, DRMI is located at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California.

Our Approach

DRMI faculty conduct programs that develop an understanding and appreciation of the concepts, techniques, and analytical decision making skills related to defense resources management. We draw upon evidence-based research and practice from the fields of management, economics and decision analysis. Our goal is to enhance the effective allocation and use of resources in defense organizations

The mission, objectives and responsibilities of DRMI are set forth in Department of Defense Directive 5010.35.

Programs Offered

Defense Resources Management Course - Four weeks in length; presented four times a year.

International Defense Management Course - Eleven weeks in length; presented twice a year.

Senior International Defense Management Course - Four weeks in length; presented once each year; normally starting the last week of June.

Multiple-Criteria Decision Making Course – Two weeks in length; presented as scheduled.

Budget Preparation, Execution and Accountability Course - Eight days in length; presented as scheduled.

Performance Management and Budgeting- Five days in length; presented as scheduled.

Risk Management - Two weeks in length; presented as scheduled.

Human Capital Resources Management Course - Two weeks in length; presented as scheduled.

Business Case Analysis - One week in length; presented as scheduled.

Mobile Education Courses - Normally one to two weeks in length, for U.S. military services and defense agencies, and for foreign governments upon specific request and approval.

Courses for Other Agencies - Programs are from one to two weeks duration, resident or on-site, for non-defense federal governments upon specific request and approval.

DRMI Curricula

DRMI faculty prepare integrated curricula from many disciplines including management, economics and decision analysis. Each course requires course participants to understand and use the basic language and analytic tools that support some aspect of defense resources management.

All courses are E-IMET certified.

Course Descriptions

In-Resident Courses

Human Capital Resources Management Course (HCRM)

Participants:

U.S. and international military officers and civilians.

Military grades of O-3 and above, and defense-related civilians of equivalent rank.

This course is presented in English.

In the Human Capital Resources Management course, DRMI faculty introduce participants to effective strategic human capital management approaches that combine the need for transparency and accountability with the unique demands of the defense and security sectors. This course is designed for military officers rank O-3 to O-6 and equivalent civilian officials (GS-09 to GS-15).

The course covers four central themes. The first introduces relevant economic concepts needed to analyze labor/capital tradeoff and the role of governments in economic systems. The second focuses on strategic planning for the work force including force sizing, capabilities based planning, and budgets. The third and fourth emphasize human resources integration and total force management. Specific topics covered include identifying and framing human capital issues; economics of military manpower; capabilities based human capital planning; policies and practices for force development: recruitment, screening, selection, training, education, compensation, promotion criteria; career planning and management; performance assessments; mediation and negotiation; salary and benefits; total force integration including active duty and reserve military personnel, civilian personnel, and private-sector contract personnel; and performance management.

DRMI faculty teach the course using a stimulating mix of lectures, small group discussions and real world case studies. This approach provides a dynamic learning environment designed to develop the decision making skills necessary in today's challenging environment. A capstone exercise enables participants to use the information in the course to focus on and develop a human capital strategic issue of concern to their command.

Business Case Analysis

Participants:

U.S. and international military officers and civilians.

Military grades of O-3 and above, and defense-related civilians of equivalent rank.

This course is presented in English.

This course introduces participants to the concepts, procedures and analytical tools that support the development of a credible Business Case Analysis (BCA). As defense resources become more limited, decision makers are forced to make difficult choices that require thoughtful analysis of the cost and benefit of alternatives.

The BCA examines the financial and non-financial elements of alternative courses of action over the life cycle of systems. It supports rational choices based on objective analysis. Participants will learn to identify the important elements of a decision problem, generate alternatives, and create life cycle models to capture cost, financial and non-financial benefits, and risk.

Topics covered include stakeholder analysis, problem definition, generation of alternatives, life cycle cost models, cost estimating techniques, net present value analysis, sensitivity analysis, monetizing benefits, measuring effectiveness, modeling uncertainty and risk, and documenting and presenting results. The course provides the information and skills necessary to complete a BCA in accordance with the DoD BCA Guidebook (2011).

Defense Resources Management Course (DRMC)

Participants: U.S. and international military officers and civilians.

(U.S.): Military officers from all services (grades O-3 and above); DoD civilians GS-9 and above.

(International): Equivalent military and civilians as above. English language capability required.

This course is presented in English.

Integrates analytical concepts, principles, methods, and techniques drawn from the disciplines of management, economics, and quantitative methods, and applies them to decisions involving the allocation of financial, logistic and human resources. A variety of analytical frameworks are presented that will enhance the participants' competence at recognizing and evaluating the risk assessments and tradeoffs that must be made among competing alternatives at both the strategic and operational levels of defense organizations.

DRMI faculty teach this course using a mix of lectures, small group discussions and real world case studies. This approach provides a dynamic learning environment designed to develop the analytical decision making skills necessary in today's challenging environment. Contemporary issues such as the global war on terror, regional and international instability, infrastructure protection and multinational defense cooperation are used to illustrate the environment in which current defense resource allocation decisions must be made.

CPE: 116 points. Graduate Education Credit: 4 units (requires passing a test at the end of weeks 2 and 4)

International Defense Management Course (IDMC)

Participants: International students only. Military grades of O-3 and above and defense-related civilians of equivalent rank.

This course is presented in English.

The course provides a series of lectures in three major areas: the defense management environment, quantitative and economic analysis, and management systems in the context of strategy, implementation, and operations. A major curricular concept of this course is comparative resources management, i.e. the examination of how different countries allocate resources. In order to enhance the comparative aspects of the curriculum, DRMI leadership encourages broad national representation with a diversity of both military services/agencies and civilian government officials. In addition to the small-group discussions that are a key part of the learning environment, each country's participants are required to give a presentation on national security issues faced by their country. These presentations allow for class-wide discussion of key security issues around the world.

During the course, DRMI conducts a field trip to selected military and government agencies in the Washington D.C. area. This trip provides an opportunity for the participants to receive special briefings on management techniques and problems, and to observe actual practices at the operating level.

Senior International Defense Management Course (SIDMC)

Participants: Senior international students only. Enrollment is restricted to military flag and general officers (grades O-7 and above) and defense-related civilians of equivalent rank, except for countries where the O-6 grade is comparable to flag/general rank, in which case officials may be enrolled on a waiver basis.

Participation in this course is normally 50-54 senior officials from as many as 45 countries.

This course is presented in English.

The lecture, small discussion group, case study, and problem format and content described above for the International Defense Management Course also apply, but are compressed in time. Two or three senior U.S. guest speakers are invited to address the class and a short field trip is conducted.

Multiple Criteria Decision Making Course (MCDM)

Participants:

U.S. and international military officers and civilians.

Military grades of O-3 and above and defense-related civilians of equivalent rank.

This course is presented in English.

This course develops a method of approach to support decision making by managers in defense organizations. The focus is on practical application to management decisions involving many organizational objectives. Emphasis is placed on formulating the problem, understanding the analytical process involved in evaluating potential solution alternatives, and interpreting the results of the analysis in support of choosing a solution. We will provide practical examples from defense resource allocation problems. Each participant will be required to apply the multi-criteria decision approach taught during this course to a decision problem of current interest to their own MoD. The problem can be one that is already being analyzed, or a new problem. Participants will have the opportunity to work in depth on this problem with a faculty member during the course. A final presentation will be delivered on the last day of the course. This exercise will link the theoretical environment with the real world through a practical and relevant application of course concepts. It is also hoped that this will serve as a foundation for further work on this problem once the participants return to their own organizations

Budget Preparation, Execution and Accountability Course

Participants:

U.S. and international military officers and civilians.

Military grades of O-3 and above, and defense-related civilians of equivalent rank.

This course is presented in English.

This course examines the preparation, execution and accountability of defense budgets. We provide the foundation for preparing and executing the budget by discussing the overall budget process beginning with planning and programming. Planning and programming are the stages where policy formulation and allocation of resources support national priorities, goals and objectives. This course reviews these concepts, and then illustrates how to take the programming decisions from the Ministry of Defense (MOD) through the budget cycle. We begin with a section on budget preparation using MOD programming guidance, integrating programs with budget guidance to create a budget. We then provide information, tools and techniques, and exercises on estimating budget submissions, funds control, performance management and feedback, all components of preparing, executing, and providing accountability for defense budgets.

Risk Management

Participants:

U.S. and international military officers and civilians.

Military grades of O-3 and above, and defense-related civilians of equivalent rank.

This course is presented in English.

This course focuses on the question of risk and how to incorporate risk analysis into public sector policymaking. The course examines the question of uncertainty and how to quantify uncertainty. The course then moves into the question of how to quantify risk. Questions of acceptable and unacceptable risk are examined and participants are challenged with a series of case studies to manage risk in a public sector decision making environment.

Performance Management and Budgeting

Participants:

US Officers (Active or Reserve) and International Military Officers, of Grades 0-3 and above, or equivalent; individuals participating in accelerated career development programs; and foreign officials of similar rank or grade.

This course is presented in English.

This course examines performance management and budgeting beginning with planning-to-budgeting and government accounting systems, and different types of and uses for budgets. We provide a foundation for performance management and budgeting by developing top-level goals and objectives, examining indicators of performance and performance hierarchies, and showing how indicators can be used in budgeting systems. Faculty present real world and teaching examples of measures of efficiency and effectiveness, and how those measures impact budget decisions and implementation. Participants then create performance measures for a defense organization and discuss how they can be used in a defense budget. Participants should bring examples of performance measurements for their own organizations and how that information is implemented in their own budget systems.

In-Resident Course Dates. Current courses dates are available on our website at www.nps.edu/drmi.

Mobile Education Courses

Mobile International Defense Management Course (MIDMC)

MASL P319016

The Mobile International Defense Management Course (MIDMC) is suitable for professionals concerned with the economic, efficient and effective allocation and use of scarce defense resources in today's complex and uncertain security environment. Participants normally come from a broad spectrum of fields, to include logistics, operations, personnel, acquisition, financial management, program management, planning, engineering, and program evaluation. This course is designed for military officers rank O-3 and above and equivalent civilian officials.

Analytical Decision Making Course (ADMC)

The ADMC is suitable for professionals concerned with the economic, efficient and effective allocation and use of scarce defense resources in today's complex and uncertain security environment. Participants usually come from a broad spectrum of fields, to include logistics, operations, personnel, acquisition, financial management, program management, planning, engineering, and program evaluation. This course is designed for military officers rank O-3 and above and equivalent civilian officials.