Research Summaries

Back FL-58 Phase I and Phase II Evaluation

Fiscal Year 2019
Division Graduate School of Operational & Information Sciences
Department Operations Research
Investigator(s) Yoshida, Ruriko
Sponsor Naval Air Systems Command (Navy)
Summary We will analyze the Spectro Scientific FL-58 at NAVAIR to determine the repeatability and reproducibility of the unit. The unit is in theory a field deployable unit that can be used to measure the quality of used oil samples. The unit consists of four distinct units which include a viscometer, infrared spectrometer, particle counter, and XRF. Oil is input into each separate module by an operator to analyze for each property. For this study eight different turbine oil samples conforming to the specification MIL-PRF-23699 and MIL-PRF-7808 were used to the analysis. The samples were also contaminated with hydraulic oil conforming to MIL-PRF-83282 and tap water. The oil samples were measured on two units by three operators to determine the repeatability and reproducibility of the FL-58 unit.
Eight oil samples were created to test a high low condition for each instrument on the unit. A design of experiments was created using a Plackett-Burman design shown in Table 1 to evaluate five different factors which were viscosity, water content, total acid number (TAN), amount of contamination, and amount of wear debris. The amount of wear debris will be determined by both the particle count and the XRF. The assumption in this analysis is that none of the factors will influence any other parameter.
For the viscosity measurement the high reference was MIL-PRF-23699 oil which has a viscosity of 5 cSt at 100? C and the low reference was MIL-PRF-7808 Grade 3 oil which has a viscosity of 3 cSt at 100? C. The contaminant that was picked for the study is a hydraulic oil that conforms to the MIL-PRF-83282 specification and has a viscosity of 3.5 cSt at 100? C. This fluid was selected as a contaminant because it was already established in the unit for the turbine oil material types as a known contaminant. The high TAN reference oils were created by using oxidation and corrosion test rigs that increase the value as part of the test. Other high TAN fluids were created by placing them in an oven at elevated temperatures for several weeks. The low TAN fluids were newer fluids that had not experienced elevated temperatures. To create a high water reference fluid, tap water was added into the oil sample. For the low water concentrations no water was added to the fluid. The high wear metal fluids were oils that had been previously tested on the turbine oil spur gear scuffing test rig call the Ryder Gear Test, and other samples were created using a bearing test that had generated wear debris from buildup misalignment.
Keywords
Publications Publications, theses (not shown) and data repositories will be added to the portal record when information is available in FAIRS and brought back to the portal
Data Publications, theses (not shown) and data repositories will be added to the portal record when information is available in FAIRS and brought back to the portal