Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS)

Website

www.nps.edu/Academics/GSOIS

Dean

Gordon McCormick, Ph.D.

Naval Postgraduate School

Code 06, Glasgow Hall, Room 220

1411 Cunningham Road

Monterey, CA 93943

(831) 656-2933, DSN 756-2933

GMcCormick@nps.edu

Associate Dean

Nelson Emmons, COL, USA

Naval Postgraduate School

Code 06, Glasgow Hall, Room 220A

1411 Cunningham Road

Monterey, CA 93943

(831) 656-3116, DSN 756-3116, FAX (831) 656-3828

nlemmons@nps.edu

The Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences consists of the following departments:

Cyber Academic Group

CAG

Computer Science

CS

Defense Analysis

DA

Information Sciences

IS

Operations Research

OR

Overview

The Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences includes Graduate Resident Programs consisting of 15 technical curricula and awards Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees across five academic departments. The faculty number approximately 100 and educate approximately 600 military and DoD students annually.

In the domains of education and ideas, staying current in these dynamic times is basic to the Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences. Unlike a civilian university, at GSOIS we know we are educating our students for military related careers. First, we teach them scientific principles and mathematical methods, and then we teach them how to apply them to military objectives when they return to service.

Another university could not tailor a curriculum, adapt to change, or transform its courses as swiftly as do the GSOIS faculty. For example, pedagogically, we have embraced the shift to distance learning, especially in the past five years, as Web-based instruction has become an efficient delivery mode, and we supplement it with Video TeleEducation so that students will benefit in widely dispersed locations, sometimes in ships at sea.

Mission Statement

To deliver graduate-level education and conduct cutting-edge research in four nontraditional knowledge domains in response to the needs of naval and DoD customers. Our four knowledge domains are:

Department of Computer Sciences

Chairman

Peter J. Denning, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 317

(831) 656-3603, DSN 756-3603, FAX (831) 545-2814

pjd@nps.edu

Associate Chairman

Geoff Xie, Ph.D.

Code CS/Gx, Glasgow East, Room 125

(831) 656-2693, DSN 756-2693, FAX (831) 656-2814

xie@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Academic Affairs

Man-Tak Shing, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 334

(831) 656-2634, DSN 756-2634, FAX (831) 656-2814

shing@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Research

Geoff Xie, Ph.D.

Code CS/Gx, Glasgow East, Room 125

(831) 656-2693, DSN 756-2693, FAX (831) 656-2814

xie@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Administration

Loren E. Peitso

Code CS/Lp, Glasgow East, Room 335

(831) 656-3009, DSN 756-3009, FAX (831) 656-2814

lepeitso@nps.edu

Academic Associate of Computer Science Curriculum

Man-Tak Shing, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 334

(831) 656-2634, DSN 756-2634, FAX (831) 656-2814

shing@nps.edu

Academic Associate of MOVES Curriculum

Chris Darken, Ph.D.

Code CS/Cd, Watkins Hall, Room 382

(831) 656-2095, DSN 756-2095, FAX (831) 656-7599

cjdarken@nps.edu

Academic Associate of Software Engineering Curriculum

Man-Tak Shing, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 334

(831) 656-2634, DSN 756-2634, FAX (831) 656-2814

shing@nps.edu

Academic Associate of Computing Technology Curriculum

Man-Tak Shing, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 334

(831) 656-2634, DSN 756-2634, FAX (831) 656-2814

shing@nps.edu

Academic Associate of Identity Management and Cyber Security Curriculum

Man-Tak Shing, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 334

(831) 656-2634, DSN 756-2634, FAX (831) 656-2814

shing@nps.edu

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Bruce Allen, Research Associate (2008); B.S., California State University at Sacramento, 1989.

Pranav Anand, Visiting Assistant Professor (2008); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2006.

Peter Ateshian, Research Associate (2004); M. Eng., University of California Berkeley, 1979.

Mikhail Auguston, Associate Professor (2003); Ph.D., Glushkov Cybernetics Institute, 1983.

Eric R. Bachmann, Research Assistant Professor, (1997); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2000.

Valdis Berzins, Professor (1986); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1979.

Robert Beverly, Assistant Professor (2009); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2008.

Karen Burke, Research Associate Professor (2003); M.S., Southern Illinois University, 1979.

Paul Clark, Research Associate (1999); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1999.

Richard S. Cote, Senior Lecturer (2001); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2000.

Chris Darken, Associate Professor (2001); Ph.D., Yale University, 1993.

Rudy Darken, Professor (1996); D.Sc., George Washington University, 1995.

Arijit Das, Research Associate (2003); M.S., University of Nevada, 1989.

Duane Davis, Research Associate Professor (2008); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.

Peter J. Denning, Chairman, Department of Computer Sciences, Director of the Cebrowski Institute for Innovation and Information Superiority, and Distinguished Professor (2002); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1968.

George W. Dinolt, Professor of the Practice of Cyber Operations (2002); Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison, 1971.

Doron Drusinsky, Associate Professor (2002); Ph.D., Weizmann Institute of Science, 1988.

Chris Eagle, Senior Lecturer (1997); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1995.

John D. (JD) Fulp, Senior Lecturer (2001); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1996.

Simson L. Garfinkel, Associate Professor (2006); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2005.

John H. Gibson, Research Associate (2001); B.S., University of California at Santa Barbara, 1969.

Mark Gondree, Research Assistant Professor (2009); Ph.D., University of California at Davis, 2009.

Ted Huffmire, Assistant Professor (2007); Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 2007.

Cynthia E. Irvine, Professor and Director, center for Information Systems Security Studies and Research (1994); Ph.D., Case Western University, 1975.

Jean Khosalim, Research Associate (2011); B.S., University of California at Los Angeles, 1995.

Mathias N. Kölsch, Assistant Professor (2005); Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 2004.

G.M. Lundy, Associate Professor (1988); Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, 1988.

Luqi, Professor (1986); Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1986.

Craig Martell, Associate Professor, (2003); Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2004.

Bret Michael, Professor (1998); Ph.D., George Mason University, 1993.

Eric McMullen, LCDR, USN, Lecturer (2013); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2013.

Thuy D. Nguyen, Research Associate (2002); B.A., University of California at San Diego, 1982.

Thomas W. Otani, Associate Professor (1985); Ph.D., University of California at San Diego, 1983.

Loren E. Peitso, Senior Lecturer (2004); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2002.

Charles Prince, Research Associate (2006); B.S., Oregon State University, 1993.

Justin Rohrer, Research Assistant Professor (2011); Ph.D., University of Kansas, 2011.

Neil C. Rowe, Professor (1983); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1983.

David Shifflett, Research Associate (2000); B.S., California State University at Northridge, 1985.

Man-Tak Shing, Associate Professor (1988); Ph.D., University of California at San Diego, 1981.

Gurminder Singh, Professor and Director, Center for the Study of Mobile Devices and Communications (2002); Ph.D., University of Alberta, 1989.

Joseph A. Sullivan, CDR, USN, Assistant Professor and MOVES Institute Acting Director (2001); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2010.

Michael Thompson, Research Associate (2012); B.S., Marquette University, 1981.

Dennis M. Volpano, Associate Professor (1991); Ph.D., Oregon Graduate Institute, 1986.

Joel Young, Assistant Professor (2007); Ph.D., Brown University, 2004.

Geoffrey Xie, Professor (1996); Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1996.

Emeritus Professors

Robert B. McGhee, Professor Emeritus (1986); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1963.

Degrees

The Department of Computer Science provides graduate training and education in major areas of computer science; thus, both basic and advanced graduate courses are offered. Course work and research lead to either the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. The requirements to complete either program are rigorous and are comparable to those of other major universities.

Master of Science in Computer Science

Master of Computing Technology

Master of Science in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Master of Science in Software Engineering

Master of Arts in Identity Management and Cyber Security

Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science

Doctor of Philosophy in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Doctor of Philosophy in Software Engineering

Laboratories

There are currently 14 laboratories:

Computer Science Learning Resource Center

This laboratory provides a general purpose, networked, PC desktop environment for a variety of programming languages and software packages. It is used both as a teaching lab for a number of courses and as an open lab for NPS-wide coursework.

Introductory Computer Security Laboratory

This lab is primarily used by the Center for Information Security Studies and Research (CISR). The lab consists of a virtual infrastructure of clients and servers serving the needs of multiple CS department classes such as:

The studies of information assurance, computer security, high assurance system architecture and authentication where it is used to introduce students to studies in high assurance systems, public key infrastructure, mandatory access control, viruses, covert channels and the reference monitor concept.

The security manager's view of diverse management concerns associated with administering and operating an automated information system facility with minimized risk. Also used in certifying that students have met the requirements for educational standards published by the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS).

The fundamentals of computer forensics in the context of DoN/DoD information operations. Students examine how information is stored and how it may be deliberately hidden and/or subverted.

The basis for understanding the potential vulnerabilities in networked systems by applying a problem-solving approach to obtain information about a remote network and exploit or subvert those systems using various techniques and tools along with discussing vulnerability discovery and mitigation.

Students taking the course this lab primarily serves are from multiple departments across campus. For more information, please contact Professors Cote or Clark.

Computer Information Security Research (CISR) Laboratory

This lab is primarily used by the Center for Information Security Studies and Research (CISR). The lab consists of a virtual infrastructure of clients and servers to allow the student to study network vulnerabilities, intrusion detection, secure system management and computer forensics; where tools used by administrators and hackers can be freely researched and studied. Students are given full administrator privileges on virtual machines so that multiple operating systems and tools can provide a basis for understanding the potential vulnerabilities and their mitigation in networked systems by studying methods to: (1) obtain information about a remote network, (2) to possibly exploit or subvert systems residing on that network and (3) techniques to mitigate risks to networked systems. For more information, please contact Professors Cote or Clark.

Public Key Infrastructure Laboratory

This computer lab is primarily used by the Center for Information Security Studies and Research (CISR). This reconfigurable lab is dedicated to studies of network security, secure computer systems, security policies, modeling, and formal methods.

Additionally through the use of a Virtual Private Network (VPN), it is utilized for the Inter-Service Academy Cyber Defense Exercise (CDX). This annual exercise involving NPS, AFIT, and all four U.S. Service Academies; acting as network defenders (Blue Teams) against network attackers (Red Teams) from NSA, and DoD Information Warfare agencies. Each exercise involves approximately 32 students who spend over 640 man-hours to: install, configure, harden, and operate the defended Blue network against a week-long attack from the Red forces. Installation and configuration starts approximately four months prior to that attack. Students are given administrator/root privileges to install and configure: e-mail, Web, FTP, VTC, DNS, and SQL database servers. Students install and utilize DoD PKI certificates to digitally sign and encrypt sensitive exercise traffic. For more information, please contact Professors Cote or Clark.

Network Research and Experimentation Laboratories

Introductory PC Network Laboratory

Intermediate Local Area Network Laboratory

These two labs support the Networks Track and provide students the opportunity to apply network theory in concrete applications. The Introductory PC Network Laboratory enables students to install network hardware and software, learning firsthand the advantages, limitations, and intricacies of various components and operating systems. The Intermediate Local Area Network Laboratory allows students to participate in ongoing Next Generation INTERNET research, advanced protocol development, future high-speed digital switching systems experimentation, network management, and control design and analysis. These labs also directly support DoD-funded research for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Wireless and Mobile Computing Laboratory

The Wireless and Mobile Computing Lab provides the majority of academic computing needs to support the wireless and mobile computing track within the Department of Computer Science. This lab provides students with the opportunity to program and examine security aspects of mobile computing devices ranging from personal digital assistants (PDAs) through cellular phones.

Autonomous Robotics Coordination Laboratory

This teaching and research computer lab supports graduate students and faculty work on sponsored classes/research projects regarding the coordination between multiple autonomous robots to achieve a coordinated result. The lab is equipped with several types of programmable robots and a wide range of intelligent software tools, including programming languages, planners, language processors, image processors, and neural-computing.

Software Engineering Laboratory

This laboratory provides a state-of-the-art engineering systems environment to support graduate students and faculty work on sponsored classes and projects in software automation. The laboratory provides a test bed for DoD software-intensive systems and software for embedded safety-critical systems can be precisely tested in the lab. Evaluation and assessment on network-based system integration and interoperability, and the risk assessment on systems of systems can be conducted effectively in the lab. The lab also provides support for requirements analysis, prototyping, specification, and computer-aided system architecture design.

Forensics Exploitation Lab

This laboratory provides a state-of-the-art forensics exploitation environment to support graduate students and faculty work on sponsored classes and projects in basic and applied forensics exploitation research projects. Primary work is done with new techniques for automatically processing data recovered from disk drives and other types of storage devices. Using forensic techniques, the data on a hard drive can reveal who used or broke into a computer system, what it was used for or what was done during a break-in, and the identities of those in question.

Biometrics Research Lab

This lab is primarily used by the Center for Information Security Studies and Research (CISR). The lab consists of a virtual infrastructure of clients and servers with is used to support reimbursable and direct funded basic and applied research projects in Biometrics. The lab is used to demonstrate some of the major biometric approaches (fingerprints, facial recognition, etc.) and supports the new NPS Identity Management certificate series jointly hosted between CS and IS. For more information, please contact Professors Clark or Hopfner.

SCIF Security Lab

This laboratory provides a state-of-the-art engineering systems environment to support graduate students and faculty work on sponsored classes and projects in security areas that are required to be conducted in high-security, compartmented classifications and dedicated air-gapped hardware/networks.

Virtual Environments Lab

The Virtual Environments Lab provides the equipment necessary to experience and study virtual and augmented environments. Head-worn displays and associated tracking hardware display the visual content of artificially created environments. The immersive nature of these environments cannot be studied on other hardware such as computer monitors. Virtual and augmented environments are integral to the MOVES Institute's mission goals. They are of instrumental importance to many DoD training applications as well as military operations. Cross disciplinary classes and even student research projects can be performed with this equipment as well, for departments including Computer Science, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, and Operations Research.

Vision Lab

The NPS Vision Lab is a research and education lab in the MOVES Institute and the Computer Science Department at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. Our expertise is at the crossroads of computer vision, computer graphics and human-computer interaction. We collaborate with NPS-wide efforts on training systems, robotics and autonomous systems, sensor networks and embedded systems. We strive to accomplish projects with educational goals while incorporating and advancing current research into prototype systems.

Computer Science Course Descriptions

CS Refresher Courses

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<CS Refresher Courses CSR100-CSR101>

CSR100 Refresher for Beginning Programming (2-2) Winter/Summer

(No credit) An introduction to computer algorithms, programs, and hardware. Using structured programming and stepwise refinement techniques, students receive classroom instruction plus design and test programs in the laboratory. Computer projects of increasing difficulty are assigned. This course is not graded. Prerequisite: None.

CSR101 Refresher for Laboratory Systems (2-1) As Required

Intended for Computer Science majors, to provide an introduction to computer science and computing laboratory facilities. Both Unix and the MS-DOS operating systems are introduced from a user perspective, as well as operation of corresponding workstation and personal computer hardware. Each system's user interface, text processing, programming environment, network and communication facilities are surveyed. Students are exposed to basic principles and procedures for productive software and document development through both lecture and hands-on tutorials. Should be taken concurrently with CSR100. Not graded. No credit. Prerequisite: None.

CS Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<CS Courses CS0001-CS2173>

CS0001 Colloquium (0-1) As Required

(No credit) Departmental lecture series. Attendance is required by students in their fourth quarter. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: None.

CS0809 Capstone Project in Computing (0-V) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

For degree programs that require a capstone project. Every student in degree programs for which a capstone project is required will register for this course during each quarter of study. This course is intended to provide a set of incremental activities, reports, and presentations that will ensure student progress toward the completion of the capstone project within the time frame of the standard degree program. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: None.

CS0810 Thesis Research (0-8) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course. Prerequisite: None.

CS0820 Integrated Project (0-1) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

The Naval Postgraduate School provides many opportunities for students to participate in campus-wide interdisciplinary projects. These projects encourage students to conceptualize systems which respond to current and future operational requirements. An integral part of the project involves working with other groups to understand and resolve issues involved with system integration. This course is available to Computer Science students who are participating in a campus-wide integrated project. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: None.

CS2000 Introduction to Computer Systems (6-6) Winter/Summer

The objective of this course is to introduce foundational concepts from computing systems by constructing a general-purpose computer system from the ground up. By integrating algorithms, computer architecture, operating systems, and compilers through hands-on projects, the course will explore hardware and software design techniques and balancing tradeoffs between competing design constraints. Students will learn about the engineering of systems across many levels of abstraction, from digital logic to software design. Corequisites: CS2020 (may be enrolled concurrently.)

CS2011 Computing Systems Principles (4-0) Fall/Spring

Designed to provide computer science majors with a basic understanding of computer systems hardware. The course includes the following topics: basic computer concepts, number systems and data representation, digital logic and Boolean algebra, storage devices and organization, basic computer organization and control, and instruction formats, addressing modes and the assembler process. No previous background in computer hardware is assumed. Prerequisite: None.

CS2020 Introduction to Programming (4-2) Fall/Spring

This course teaches the fundamental programming concepts. Topics covered include data types, variables, expressions, parameter passing, control structures, strings, arrays, exception handling, software development, and testing techniques. Python is used in the course, but the focus of the course is not to teach any specific features of Python. The primary focus of the course is to teach core programming concepts that are universally available in modern programming languages. Prerequisite: None.

CS2071 Fundamental Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (4-2) Fall/Spring

This course is an introductory course in program development techniques and the structured and object-oriented programming paradigms using C++. The topics covered include: problem-solving, documentation, C++ Integrated Development Environment (IDE), control flow, native types and statements, operators, structures, functions, pointers, arrays, object-oriented programming, encapsulation (class and objects), and I/O. Weekly programming or written assignments will be assigned. Prerequisite: None.

CS2072 Fundamental Object Oriented Programming in JavaScript (4-2) Fall

This course is an introductory course in program development techniques and the structured and object-oriented programming paradigms using JavaScript. The topics covered include: problem-solving, documentation, control flow, native types and statements, operators, structures, functions, arrays, object-oriented programming, encapsulation, and VO. Weekly programming or written assignments will be assigned. Prerequisite: None.

CS2073 Fundamental Object-Oriented Programming in Java (4-2) As Required

This course is an introductory course in program development techniques and the structured and object-oriented programming paradigms using Java. The topics covered include: problem-solving, documentation, Java Integrated Programming Environment (IDE), control flow, native types and statements, operators, structures, functions, pointers, arrays, object-oriented programming, encapsulation (class and objects), and I/O. Weekly programming or written assignments will be assigned. Prerequisite: None.

CS2121 Fundamentals of Automata Algorithms (4-0) As Required

This course presents the basic concepts in automata and algorithms that are essential to computer professionals. Practical examples are used to illustrate course material. Topics covered include finite state automata, pushdown automata, regular and context free languages, limits of what can be solved on a computer (undecidability), the Halting Problem, algorithms for sorting and searching, binary search trees, hash tables, graph algorithms for shortest paths and minimum spanning trees, as well as measures of algorithm complexities (big-O notation and intractability). Prerequisite: None.

CS2170 ADA as a Second Language (4-2) As Required

A first course in ADA for students experienced in another programming language. Students learn to implement problem solutions using the procedural and object-oriented language features of ADA. The procedural programming topics include: data types, operators, input/output, control structures, repetition structures, functions, arrays, and pointers. The object-oriented topics include: data abstraction and encapsulation, packages, inheritance, polymorphism, and generics. Weekly programming projects will be assigned. Prerequisite: Recent completion of the complete series in another programming language course, or programming experience in another programming language.

CS2171 C++ as a Second Language (4-2) As Required

A first course in C++ for students experienced in another programming language. Students learn to implement problem solutions using the procedural and object-oriented language features of C++. The procedural programming topics include: data types, operators, input/output, control structures, repetition structures, functions, arrays, and pointers. The object-oriented topics include: data abstraction and encapsulation, classes, objects, operator overloading, inheritance, polymorphism, templates, and reusable class libraries. Weekly programming projects provide students the opportunity to implement techniques covered in class. Prerequisite: Recent completion of the complete series in another programming language course, or programming experience in another programming language.

CS2173 Java as a Second Language (4-2) Winter/Summer

A first course in Java for students experienced in another programming language. Students learn to implement problem solutions using the procedural and object-oriented language features of Java. Topics include: program structures and environment, arrays, exceptions, constructors and finalizers, class extension, visibility and casting, overriding versus overloading, abstract classes and interfaces, files and streams, class loaders, threads, and sockets. Programming projects provide students the opportunity to implement techniques covered in class. Prerequisite: Recent completion of the complete series in another programming language course, or programming experience in another programming language.

<CS Courses CS3000-CS3310>

CS3000 Great Principles of Computing Technology (4-1) Fall/Spring

An introduction to computing technology that underlies all of information technology (IT). Offers a holistic view of the computing field and its connections with other fields in science, business, and philosophy. Covers deep principles of information technology in the areas of computation, communication, coordination, storage, and automation. Emphasizes the historical development of these principles, why they have stood the tests of time, how they relate to one another, and how they relate to issues in other fields. Prepares students for graduate study in computing-related fields. Prerequisite: None.

CS3004 Human-Computer Interaction (2-1) Fall/Spring

This course studies the principles of human-computer interaction (HCI) and computing system usability. The design of an interactive system is much different than that of a conventional, noninteractive one. A successful software application depends on how well the designer understands the users of the system and how best to design for their needs and capabilities. In addition, an understanding of system design constraints and operational implementation issues are equally important. The primary focus of the course is to build the knowledge and skills needed to develop an effective and usable human interactive system. All students will participate on a design project that will take them through an entire interactive design process, from problem statement and requirements definition through prototyping and implementation, test, and evaluation. The course material will survey the field of HCI including interaction techniques and styles, design methodologies, evaluation techniques, software development, and input/output devices. The student will learn how to approach design problems from the user's point of view, how to study usability issues, and how to consider the strengths and limitations of the user during the design process. Prerequisite: None.

CS3021 Introduction to Data Structures and Intermediate Programming (4-2) Winter/Summer

This second course in the programming practices sequence builds upon the topics covered in CS2020. The first objective of the course is the teaching of data structures and abstract data types. The second objective is the teaching of object-oriented programming concepts such as inheritance and polymorphism. Topics covered include recursion, file input and output, dynamic memory allocation, lists, binary search trees, balanced binary search trees, and hashing techniques. C++ is used in the course. Prerequisite: CS2020.

CS3022 Programming Paradigms (4-2) Winter/Summer

This is the third course in the programming practice sequence. Based on the knowledge of Java, this course introduces students to other programming paradigms. Many concepts are illustrated using C++ and ADA Functional programming using Lisp and Haskell and logic programming using Prolog are also introduced in the course. Prerequisite: CS3021.

CS3030 Computer Architecture and Operating Systems (4-0) Winter/Summer

(For non-CS students.) This course provides an overview of basic computer hardware concepts and operating systems software. The following topics are covered: basic computer concepts; data representation; elements of computer architecture and operation; processor and process management; multiprogramming; memory management; and file management. Future trends in computer hardware and operating systems will be discussed. Prerequisites: CS2020 and CS2971, or consent of the instructor.

CS3040 Low Level Programming (4-2) Fall/Spring

This course is an accelerated survey of the C programming language for computer scientists. It introduces students to programming practices using the C language, and the tools needed to effectively write and debug C programs. The class illustrates the design decisions associated with the low-level operations not implemented in other modern programming languages, demonstrating C's performance and control capabilities. Topics include function calling convention, dynamic memory allocation, recursion, file 1/0, kernel management of files, searching/sorting, data types, data structures using C (arrays, hash tables, doubly linked lists, etc), and secure programming in C. Prerequisites: Students are expected to know how to program in at least one language, or exempted by permission of the instructor. Familiarity with Linux or another UNIX-like operating system will be helpful. Prerequisites: CS2020.

CS3060 Database Systems (3-1) Winter/Summer

This course presents an up-to-date introduction to database systems including database system architectures, physical file organizations, data models, query languages, and design of databases. Prerequisite: CS2020 or consent of the instructor.

CS3070 Operating Systems (3-2) Fall/Spring

A theoretical and practical treatment of operating concepts. Major course topics include concurrency, Ada tasking, virtual memory including demand paging and segmentation, dynamic linking and loading, file structures, and information security. The laboratory portion of the class will give students the opportunity to write and test components of a modern operating system. Prerequisites: CS2020 and CS3021 and CS2011.

CS3071 Advanced Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (4-2) As Required

This is a course in advanced object-oriented programming using C++ for students having an intermediate-level experience with C++. Students will learn guidelines for using C++ effectively through general design strategies and language specific features to make C++ programs and object-oriented designs more efficient, robust, maintainable and portable. Topics include: Memory management; Constructor and Assignment Operator Issues; Classes and Functions; Inheritance and Object-Oriented Design; Standard Template Library; Exceptions; Efficiency. Prerequisite: CS2971 or CS2171 or consent of the instructor.

CS3101 Theory of Formal Languages and Automata (4-2) Winter/Summer

This course will cover the Chomsky hierarchy of Formal Languages (regular sets, context-free languages, context-sensitive languages, and recursively enumerable languages) and the types of grammars and automata associated with each class in the hierarchy. Emphasis is placed on the major results of the theory as they apply to language and compiler design. In addition, the major results involving the concept of in decidability are covered. Prerequisite: MA3025.

CS3111 Principles of Programming Languages (4-0) As Required

This course is an introduction to the design, evaluation, and implementation of programming languages. Imperative, functional, logic, and concurrent programming methodologies are investigated, with an emphasis on practical issues. Tradeoffs in choosing different programming languages for a given task are discussed and principles on which an objective assessment of programming language design can be made are presented. Prerequisite: CS2020 or consent of the instructor.

CS3113 Compilers and Translation (3-2) Winter/Summer

This course is intended to explore the basics of modern compiler design and construction techniques. The fundamentals of scanning, parsing, and compiler semantics are developed in the framework of modern compiler-compiler and translator-writing systems technology. The laboratory periods will be used to develop a small model compiler/assembler. Prerequisite: CS3022 and CS3101 or consent of instructor.

CS3130 Software Design for Mobile Computers (3-2) As Required

This course introduces the student to rapid application development environments, programming languages, and operating systems used by commercial off-the-shelf handheld computers running operating systems such as Newton Intelligence, Magic Cap, GEOS, and PalmOS. The course includes a survey of devices, architectures, operating systems, and programming languages. Laboratory programming exercises will be required for at least one PDA-class operating system platform. Prerequisite: CS3021.

CS3140 Low-level Programming II (3-2) Winter/Summer

Assembly language is used as the vehicle to introduce students to the principles of program construction at the machine code and assembly language levels. Students will be exposed to assembly languages as formally documented by CPU designers. By studying real-world processors, the differences between complex and reduced instruction set are illustrated. Students will study the use of assemblers, linkers, and loaders in the program creation process. Common executable file formats are studied as well as standard calling conventions used to interface assembly language functions with high order languages, viz. C, functions and operating system services. The theory of disassembly and tools for disassembling executable files are covered for the purpose of analyzing binary programs. Prerequisites: CS3040 or consent of instructor.

CS3150 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course focuses on the design and analysis of efficient algorithms. Techniques for analyzing algorithms in order to measure their efficiency are presented. Control structure abstractions, such as divide and conquer, greedy, dynamic programming, backtrack (branch and bound), and local search methods are studied. The theory of NP-completeness is presented, along with current approaches to NP-hard problems. Prerequisites: CS3021 and MA3025.

CS3200 Computer Architecture (3-2) As Required

This course examines the organization of computer and processor architectures. Instruction set design alternatives, processor implementation, memory system hierarchy, and I/O systems are the main topics of study. A quantitative approach is taken in which different design alternatives are evaluated and compared through analysis and/or experimentation. The course is accompanied by a set of labs which reinforce and extend the lecture subject matter. Prerequisites: CS2011 and either CS2020 or consent of the instructor.

CS3310 Artificial Intelligence (4-1) Fall/Spring

Survey of topics and methods of Artificial Intelligence. Methods include rule-based systems, heuristic search and exploitation of natural constraints, means-ends analysis, semantic networks, and frames. Emphasis is placed on solving problems that seem to require intelligence rather than attempting to simulate or study natural intelligence. Projects to illustrate basic concepts are assigned. Prerequisites: CS2011 and one college-level course in programming.

<CS Courses CS3502-CS3920>

CS3502 Computer Communications and Networks (4-2) Fall/Spring

This course covers basic computer networking concepts and technology through the study of protocols at each layer of the Internet architecture. Materials taught in class are reinforced through laboratory projects. Prerequisites: CS2011 and CS3030 and a solid background in Computer Architecture, Algorithm and Data Structures; and programming experience with C/C++ or Java are important for success in this class.

CS3505 Introductory Computer Communications (3-2) Winter/Summer

This introductory course in computer networking focuses on high-level core internetworking concepts and the relative merits of different architectures in relation to security, performance, economic, and reliability objectives. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the Internet and Internet applications, and in particular how the end-to-end arguments, robustness principle, layering, naming, and hierarchy have enabled the Internet to scale through orders of magnitude in size and speed while accommodating widespread heterogeneity. It introduces principles of reliable communication, wireless channels, naming and directory services, content distribution networks, networks for cloud computing, overlays, and peer-to-peer communication models. This course is intended for all graduate students. Prerequisite: None.

CS3600 Introduction to Computer Security (4-2) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the terminology, concepts, issues, policies, and technologies associated with the fields of Information and Software Assurance. It covers the notions of threats, vulnerabilities, risks, and safeguards as they pertain to the desired information security properties of confidentiality, integrity, authenticity, and availability for all information that is processed, stored, or transmitted in/by information systems. This is the entry point prerequisite for all other Computer Security Track courses. Prerequisites: CS2011 or CS3030.

CS3606 An Introduction to Information System Security (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Due to the rapid development and ubiquitous deployment of computer and information systems, and the very nature of insecurities they may hold, professionals involved with the design, development, deployment, and management of these systems now require a familiarity with information assurance (IA) and security. This course will introduce topics relevant to IA and computer security necessary to create a foundation of knowledge for the information management professional. The domains of knowledge to be introduced during the course include: access control systems and methodology; telecommunications and network security; security management practices; application and systems development security; cryptography; security architecture and models; operations security; business continuity and disaster recovery planning; laws, investigations, and ethics; and physical security. This course is meant to introduce the topics and will lay the foundations for further studies in any of the domains listed. Prerequisite: None.

CS3610 Information Ethics, Crime, and Law (4-0) As Needed

This class examines the major controversies affecting today's Internet resulting from the interplay of policy, law, technology and human nature. Topics include computer crime; intellectual property; privacy; encryption; free speech; identity; data mining and additional DoD specific issues. Readings include laws, judicial opinions, popular articles, and academic computer science articles. Assignments include written exercises, a midterm quiz analyzing a public policy problem, and term paper. Prerequisite: None.

CS3621 Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Students (0-Variable) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This program requires either an Application project or a Thesis. Every student conducting an Applications Project or Thesis research in the Identity Management and Cyber Security degree program will register for this course during each quarter of study. This course is intended to provide a set of incremental activities, reports, and presentations that will ensure student progress toward the completion of the Applications Project or thesis research within the timeframe of the standard degree program. This course may be repeated for credit. Corequisites: Enrollment in the MA in Identity Management and Cyber Security degree program.

CS3633 Data Security (3-2) As Needed

Where is my data and how is it being protected? This course examines the major technologies, procedures, and controversies affecting the secure storage and use of data. Historical context; access controls vs. encryption algorithms; computer forensics and media exploitation; privacy and data recovery; security for data-at-rest vs. data-in-flight vs. data-in-computation; translucent databases; private information retrieval; data mining; cloud computing. Prerequisites: CS3600 and CS3502.

CS3636 Data Fusion with Online Information Systems (3-0) Spring

Explores data fusion as applied to personal information in both the online and offline world. Topics include credit and criminal databases, Information Surveillance, GSP, Satellite imagery, online search, text mining, anonymization, reidentification, and privacy policy. Familiarity with statistics useful but not mandatory.

CS3640 Analysis of DoD Critical Infrastructure Protection (3-1) As Needed

The DoD relies on the correct functioning of an extensive information and control infrastructure to accomplish its mission. To assist in ensuring the survivability of assets that comprise this infrastructure, the DoD has formulated a CIP lifecycle, which includes: Analysis and Assessment, Remediation, Indicators and Warnings, Mitigation, Incident Response, and Reconstitution. This course introduces students to this lifecycle, and how the criticality and survivability of mission-critical infrastructures within the DoD are assessed. Prerequisite: CS3600.

CS3645 Cyber Threats and Mitigation (3-0)

This course will cover threats to information systems within the enterprise and will provide students with options for their mitigation. An objective of the course is to allow the student to understand the potential losses associated with today's major threats in terms of data disclosure, alteration or disruption of data, and the costs associated with mitigation techniques. Topics include: current state of the art in virus, worm and Trojan technology; botnets and their uses; common attack vectors and mitigations; data exfiltration techniques; intrusion detection and prevention systems; application log analysis. Prerequisite: CS3600 Security Clearance Required: classified and unclassified versions available.

CS3651 Computability Theory and Complexity (3-1) As Required

This course covers the concepts needed to argue the decidability and computational complexity of problems. Topics include recursive enumerability, undecidability, diagonalization, computational complexity classes, intractability, Turing reduction, and many-one reducibility. Basic techniques are presented for proving undecidability and for establishing a lower bound on the computational complexity of a problem. Prerequisites: CS3101 and CS3150.

CS3660 Critical Infrastructure Protection (4-0) Spring

Open to students of the Center for Homeland Defense and Security. This course examines the critical infrastructure of the USA. Eight sectors of the critical infrastructure are examined: Banking/Finance; Health Care/Health Affairs; Space/ISR; Power/Energy; Logistics/Postal System; Transportation; Telecommunications/Satellites; and Internet/IA. Each sector and its components is characterized in terms of its vulnerabilities, especially its interdependencies and couplings with other sectors. Finally, the course identifies potential counter measures that mitigate sector and system vulnerabilities and assesses their costs and benefits. Prerequisite: NS3180.

CS3670 Information Assurance: Secure Management of Systems (3-2) Fall/Spring

This course provides students with a security manager's view of the diverse management concerns associated with administering and operating an automated information system facility with minimized risk. Students will examine both the technical and nontechnical security issues associated with managing a computer facility, with emphasis on DoD systems and policies. Students have the opportunity to earn the following CNSS (formerly NSTISSI) certifications: INFOSEC Professional, System Administration in Information Systems Security, and ISSO. Prerequisite: CS3600.

CS3686 Identity Management Infrastructure (3-0)

This course covers a broad range of topics related to the standards, protocols, technology, and management infrastructure necessary to field an enterprise-level identity management (IdM) solution. Lecture and reading assignments span the gamut of IdM issues: from low-level authentication protocol mechanics, to high-level identity federal initiatives. This course is one of several that will collectively compose the requirements for Identity Management specialization tracks in the Information Science and Computer Science degree programs. Completion of four courses: CS3686, CS3699, IS3710, and IS3720, will meet the requirements for earning the Federal/DoD Identity Management Certificate offered by NPS. Prerequisites: None.

CS3690 Network Security (4-1) Winter/Summer

This course covers the concepts and technologies used to achieve confidentiality, integrity, and authenticity for information processed across networks. Topics include: fundamentals of TCP/IP-based networking, core network security principles, traffic filtering types and methodology, packet-level traffic analysis, employment of cryptography, tunneling/encapsulation, Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), remote authentication protocols, and virtual private networks based on the IPSec, L2TP, and SSL protocols. Prerequisites: CS3600 and CS3502 and IS3502.

CS3695 Network Vulnerability Assessment and Risk Mitigation (3-2) Winter/Summer

This course provides a basis for understanding the potential vulnerabilities and their mitigation in networked systems by studying methods to: (1) obtain information about a remote network, (2) to possibly exploit or subvert systems residing on that network and (3) techniques to mitigate risks to networked systems. Labs provide practical experience with current network attack and vulnerability assessment tools, as well as tools and methodologies for a systematic approach to reducing vulnerabilities. A final project that demonstrates skill and knowledge is required. Prerequisite: One of the following: CS3502 or IS3502 or CS3690 or permission of the instructor.

CS3699 Biometrics (3-0) As Required

This course reviews the technical details of biometric identification and verification. The major biometric approaches (fingerprints, irises, etc.) are covered in detail with respect to acquisition of biometric data, matching techniques, anti-spooking techniques, and current standards. The uses and limitations of biometrics are covered, as well as some of the legal, ethical, and privacy concerns of maintaining and using biometric data. This course is one of several that will collectively comprise the requirements for Identity Management specialization tracks in both the Information Science and Computer Science degree programs. Completion of four courses, CS3686, CS3699, IS3710, and IS3720, will meet the requirements for earning the Federal DoD Identity Management Certificate offered by NPS. Prerequisites: None.

CS3800 Directed Study in Computer Sciences (0-V) As Required

(Variable hours 0-2 to 0-8.) Individual research and study by the student under the supervision of a faculty member. The course is intended primarily to permit interested students to pursue in-depth subjects not fully covered in formal class work. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

CS3920 Topics in Computer Science (V-V) As Required

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support subject matter of special interest, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will either be drawn from areas not covered by core courses or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

<CS Courses CS4112-CS4556>

CS4112 Distributed Systems (3-2) Winter

An advanced treatment of distributed systems. Major course topics include models of distributed computing; design and assessment of distributed algorithms, including clocks, mutual exclusion, resolution of conflicts for resources, control and termination of distributed computations, leader election, message ordering, synchronizers, slicers, distributed shared memory, consensus, self-stabilization, and fault tolerance; and current topics in distributed systems, such as distributed operating systems, distributed multimedia systems, sensor and peer-to-peer networks, and web services. Prerequisite: CS3070.

CS4113 Advanced Language Topics (4-0) As Required

This course is designed to explore concepts considered essential to the study of programming languages. These concepts include the lambda calculus, the Church-Rosser Theorem, reduction strategies, continuations, semantics, and recursion. Prerequisites: CS3111 and CS3070.

CS4182 Capstones in Computer Science (4-0) Winter/Summer

This is the capstone course for the CS curriculum. It surveys the transforming effects of seminal papers on ten subject areas within computer science. Each paper illustrates how the introduction of an organizing framework, a suitable form of analysis, or a set of supporting principles was able to change the way problems within the subject area were approached; a change that led to integrated and lasting solutions. Students will be responsible for reading and evaluating key papers that have helped to shape modern computer science. Prerequisite: CS3000.

CS4310 Sensory Artificial Intelligence (4-1) As Required

A study of methods of computational simulation in natural-language processing, computer vision, and sensor networks. Issues in natural-language processing include modeling of syntax, semantics, morphology, discourse, phonetics, and stochastic phenomena. Issues in computer vision include low-level processing, segmentation, shape inference, and object identification. Issues in sensor networks include deployment, local inference, and communications. Prerequisite: CS3310.

CS4312 Advanced Database Systems (3-1) As Required

This course is a sequel to CS3060, Database Systems. The course will provide an in-depth coverage of relational database theory, distributed database systems, semantic data models, query processing and optimization, transaction management, recovery, security, and other advanced topics. Topics will be illustrated using both commercial and prototype database systems. Prerequisite: CS3060 or consent of the instructor.

CS4313 Advanced Robotic Systems (3-2) As Required

AI methods for robots and unmanned vehicles. The first part of the course will discuss generic sensing and control mechanisms, including reactive and hierarchical control. The second part of the course will focus on specialized areas of robotics, swarm robotics and unmanned autonomous vehicles. Prerequisite: CS3310.

CS4315 Learning Systems and Data Mining (3-1) Winter

A survey of methods by which software and hardware can improve their performance over time. Methods include case-based reasoning, concept learning, neural networks, simulated annealing, and genetic algorithms. Students will do projects with software tools. Prerequisites: CS3000 and one college-level course in programming.

CS4317 Language Systems (3-1) As Required

This course introduces the computational aspects of processing language. Topics include lexicography, morphology, grammars, parsing, semantics, stochastic grammars. Hidden Markov models, speech understanding, language generation and language translation systems. Prerequisites: CS3310, CS3150, CS3101.

CS4322 Internet Information Systems Technology (3-2) Summer

A course exploring the implementation of recent Internet tools for supporting databases, intelligent systems, and information retrieval. Topics include browsers and server technology including servlets, XML, data mining, and data warehousing. Students will do programming to build their own tools. Prerequisites: CS2020, CS3310 or CS3060, or consent of the instructor.

CS4330 Introduction to Computer Vision (3-2) Fall

This course introduces students to the main concepts that allow computers to "see" and understand visual information. It teaches methods and skills in image processing, pattern recognition, statistical analysis, classification, and learning. These are exemplified on applications such as military intelligence, surveillance, object tracking, robotic navigation, human-computer interfaces, and visual effects. Students complete a small class project that demonstrates the use of computer vision for an application of their interest. In laboratory activities, students get hands-on experience with the most important tools for building practical vision systems. Experiments and projects are tightly coupled with the material covered in class. Students must be familiar with a programming language such as C, C++, or Java (CS2020, CS2171, CS2173, etc.). Prerequisites: Helpful, but not necessary, is knowledge of basic linear algebra, probability or game theory, and Matlab (EC1010), or consent of the instructor.

CS4450 Advanced Computer Architecture (4-0) Summer

This course covers advanced topics in computer architecture and the application of concepts in computer architecture to the design and use of computers. The topics discussed include classes of computer architecture, application-oriented architecture, and high performance architecture. Prerequisites: CS2011, and CS3200 or equivalent.

CS4533 Wireless Mobile Computing (3-2) Fall/Spring

This course will focus on a new paradigm in computing: wireless mobile computing. Portable, handheld, computing devices are now being used for many applications previously accomplished by larger desktop computers or dedicated small devices. Some of these devices contain powerful RISC CPUs, user-accessible flash RAM storage, networking and peripheral connectivity, handwriting recognition, and built-in infrared networking capabilities. The goal of this course is to provide a fundamental understanding of the devices, communications, and design and implementation issues in building such mobile networked applications. Students will be required to research, design, and/or implement a project that integrates multiple technologies to solve a real-world problem requiring mobile computing. Prerequisites: CS3502 and CS3021.

CS4535 Mobile Devices (3-2) Spring

There are a large number of mobile devices, including cellular phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), PDA/cellular phone combinations, pagers, badges, and other wearable devices, in use today in a variety of applications. The number and variety of such devices keeps growing at a fast pace, as new processing, display, and battery and wireless technologies are invented, and as new applications for these devices are envisioned. This is a practical, hands-on course that covers the architecture, usability, and applications of mobile devices. From an application perspective, this course will discuss mobile devices as tools to support homeland security applications, military applications for capability enhancement, and communications and computing needs of mobile professionals. The study of principles is combined with hands-on laboratory exercises to develop applications on mobile devices. The ultimate objective of the course is to show students how they can exploit the capabilities of mobile devices to implement innovative applications to enhance productivity and effectiveness in a variety of domains. Prerequisite: CS2020.

CS4537 Wireless Data Services (3-2) Summer

Tremendous progress has been made in mobile device and wireless networking technologies. Many different PDAs, cell phones, smartphones, and specialized devices have been introduced in the marketplace, and been enthusiastically adopted by millions of people around the world. Wireless networking technology development and adoption has moved even faster! The combination of mobile devices and wireless networking lends itself to data applications that can make a significant difference in a wide variety of application areas. The aim of this course is provide an understanding of the issues, technologies, and applications related to wireless data services. In addition to other topics, this course will cover wireless Internet, SMS, MMS, WAP, iMODE, J2ME, and BREW. Prerequisites: CS4533 and CS4535.

CS4538 Mobile Device and Wireless Security (3-1) Winter

The application of mobile and wireless devices has grown rapidly in military and commercial environments. The functionality and reliability of these devices has grown tremendously. The mobile and wireless nature of these devices raise new and important security challenges not usually present in static environments. This course will address these challenges including the security functionality, protocol, and assurance issues associated with this emerging technology. Prerequisites: CS3600 and CS3690 and CS4537.

CS4550 Computer Networks II (4-0) As Required

This course covers advanced and emerging topics in computer networking. Some topics taught in CS3502 will be reviewed and studied in more detail. Other course subjects may vary from instructor to instructor and they include: multimedia networking, wireless networks, multicasting, peer-to-peer networks, quality of service, network management, network architecture, and security. Prerequisite: CS3502.

CS4552 Network Design and Programming (3-3) Fall/Spring

The course is intended for CS and non-CS majors. Students will develop research and troubleshooting skills through experiments performed on real networks. The networking protocols covered in this course typically include: DNS, HTTP, FTP, SMTP, DHCP, TCP, UDP, RIP, OSPF, EIGRP. BGP, and VPN. Students will explore an emerging networking technology or issue and provide a technical report discussing the selected topic. Prerequisites: An advanced programming course, CS3502 and CS4550, or equivalent with consent of the instructor.

CS4554 Network Modeling and Analysis (4-0) Winter/Summer

The purpose of this class is to learn to formally specify and analyze network protocols, emphasizing wireless protocols, and in the process acquire a thorough understanding of these protocols. Formal protocol models, such as communicating finite state machines and systems of communicating machines, will be used as a tool for this purpose. Some protocols other than wireless protocols may also be covered. Several research papers from recent years will be assigned reading. Cellular networking, IEEE 802.11, Bluetooth, and wireless local loop networks will be covered as well. The class will study these protocols in the context of the network architectures and physical environments they are intended to perform in. Students should acquire an increased knowledge of formal tools, experience in protocol and system analysis, and a better understanding of protocols and networks. At the discretion of the instructor, other advanced topics such as simulation and statistical analysis of networks and network protocols may be added and/or substituted for some of the topics above. The emphasis is on application of mathematical rigor to the analysis and description of networking protocols. Prerequisite: CS3502.

CS4556 Business Economics Network Technology (4-0) Fall/Spring

This class teaches a different side of the networking world—the business and economics areas, which necessarily include relevant laws and government policies. The course reviews the history of telecommunications, including the major inventions and the development of the business and resulting regulations. The importance of capital and investment is taught by studying actual decisions of telecom companies and their results in the ensuing years. In this way, the students learn how the telecom industry developed and how the current regulatory structure came about. All of the major telecom laws and court decisions are studied. Basic business and economics principles are also studied, and numerous real-life examples are given. Students learn to write business plans and to analyze a telecom company or industry. The influence of the stock market on major companies is shown. The results of having either too much capital or too little are examined. The divestiture of AT&T in 1984, the resulting competition, the Telecom Act of 1996, and the telecom boom and bust of 1996-2003 are all examined in detail. Students in this class will gain a thorough understanding of the telecom industry, the major companies, and the effects of government regulation (too much or too little) and capital investment. Prerequisite: None.

CS4558 Network Traffic Analysis (3-2)

Explores fundamentals of packet-switched network traffic analysis at the network layer and above as applied to problems in traffic engineering, economics, security, etc. Explores the design and integration of analytic tools and techniques into the fabric of the network including: spatial and temporal anomaly detection, origin-destination matrix estimation, application mix determination, deep-packet inspection, fingerprinting, intrusion detection and insider threat mitigation. Finally, the course covers active defense and offensive methods reliant on traffic analysis. Prerequisites: CS3502 and CS4550 or equivalent.

<CS Courses CS4600-CS5810>

CS4600 Secure System Principles (3-2) Fall/Spring

An advanced course that focuses on key principles of a constructive approach to secure systems. A brief review of operating systems and computer architecture is provided. Major topics include threat characterization and subversion; confinement; fundamental abstractions, principles, and mechanisms, such as reduced complexity, hierarchical relationships, least privilege, hardware protection, resource management and virtualization, software security, secure system composition, mutual suspicion, synchronization, covert and side-channel analysis, secure metadata, secure operational states, usability, and life cycle assurance. Current developments will include advances in security hardware, components, and systems. Prerequisites: CS3600, CS3070 and CS3502.

CS4603 Database Security (3-1) As Needed

Course topics include: policies for information integrity and confidentiality of database (DB) systems, modeling of secure DB systems, security in statistical DBs, security approaches for object-oriented DBs, multitier architecture security issues, privacy, aggregation and inference, military applications of secure DBs, and other important implementation issues, such as atomicity, serialization, and view-based controls. Prerequisites: CS3600, CS3060 and CS3070.

CS4605 Security Policies, Models, and Formal Methods (3-1) As Needed

This course covers the methods used to specify, model, and verify the access control mechanisms of computational systems. The identification of the security policy and its interpretation in terms of a technical policy is covered. Several security policy and access-control models are explored. Prerequisites: CS3150, CS3600 and CS3101.

CS4610 Information Ethics (3-0) As Needed

Rapid and revolutionary advances in IT confront society with novel choices and opportunities. This course attempts to identify the kinds of ethical choices that may arise from its use. While a few may be clear choices, most will be between the greater of goods or the lesser of evils. These choices will be difficult because the values are difficult to identify, the right choices are more difficult than the wrong, and their consequences are neither certain nor easily predicted. Prerequisite: None.

CS4614 Advanced Topics in Computer Security (3-1) Winter/Summer/Fall/Spring

This course applies graduate-level knowledge and reasoning skills in written essays and verbal discussion of current topics in computer security. Students read academic papers regarding information assurance topics, and discuss issues that they derive from the readings. This pedagogical approach is constructivist in encouraging the students to develop their own viewpoints and conclusions. Prerequisites: CS3600.

CS4615 Formal Analysis of Cryptographic Protocols (3-1) As Needed

Cryptographic protocols (such as key-exchange and mutual-authentication protocols) are essential to the security of all distributed computer networks. Such protocols are often simple, but they also often fall to "structural" attacks (attacks that do not need to break the underlying cryptography). This course considers the "protocol analysis problem": finding structural attacks against a protocol (if they exist) or proving their absence (if they do not). We will examine several protocol-analysis techniques and compare their strengths and weaknesses. Advanced topics include (as time permits) protocol-design heuristics, trust-management and higher-level protocol goals, interactions between protocols, computational soundness, and decidability results. Prerequisites: CS3600 or permission of instructor.

CS4648 Advanced Cyber Munitions (3-2) As Required

This course will explore how malware is constructed through the analysis of existing malware. Techniques to provide attribution to malware will be explored. Topics include: malware obfuscation, insertion, dynamic updates, encryption and key management, and the use of malware to drive covert channels. The construction and operation of malware such as large scale distributed Botnets will be used in case studies. Prerequisites: CS3070, CS3140 or consent of the instructor.

CS4650 Fundamentals of Information Systems Security Engineering (3-1) Spring

This course presents the fundamental principles and processes of information systems security engineering (ISSE). The ISSE life cycle model consists of five stages: requirements definition, design, implementation, testing and deployment. The processes involved in these stages are explained in the context of a Defense-in-Depth protection strategy, with an emphasis on the role of security requirements engineering (SRE) in the construction of a secure system. This course covers the concepts and techniques needed to systematically elicit, derive and validate security requirements. It introduces how these techniques can be used in practice, and addresses the relationship between SRE and secure system design. Course work will be a combination of lectures, case studies and a team-based SRE project. Prerequisite: CS4600.

CS4652 Applied Information Systems Security Engineering (3-2) As Needed

This course focuses on the key concepts and practices of information systems security engineering from a system life cycle perspective. Core topics include security architecture and design analysis, system implementation assessment, requirements/implementation traceability correspondence, security test and evaluation strategy, certification and accreditation (C&A) requirements analysis, and risk management. The Systems Thinking approach is introduced for assessing system security behaviors based on dependencies, interactions and emergent properties of its components in the context of functionality, scalability, interoperability and maintainability. Case studies and laboratory projects will demonstrate security engineering practices through the life cycle of a secure system. Prerequisite: CS4650.

CS4670 Quantum Computing (4-0) Spring

This interdisciplinary survey course explores the evolution and direction of quantum computing technology. Topics include quantum circuits, quantum algorithms (including factoring and search), and quantum key distribution. Jointly listed as PH4670. Prerequisites: familiarity with basic notions of computing, quantum theory, and linear algebra, consistent with the material covered in CS3000, PH2652, MA3042 or PH3991.

CS4675 Intrusion Detection and Response (3-1) Winter/Summer

This is an introduction to methods of intrusion detection in computer systems and networks and the possible methods of automatic responses to those events. It will cover types of intrusion detection, inference of suspicion, implementation, and management, and will examine at least one specific product. A special focus in response management will be the use of deliberate deception in defense of systems, including the psychology and ethics of deception in general. Prerequisite: CS3600.

CS4677 Computer Forensics (3-3) Fall/Spring

This course covers the fundamentals of computer forensics in the context of DoN/DoD information operations. Students examine how information is stored and how it may be deliberately hidden and/or subverted. Coverage includes: practical forensic examination and analysis, techniques of evidence recovery, legal preparation of evidence, common forensic tools, principle of original integrity, disk examination, and logging. Prerequisite: CS3600.

CS4678 Advanced Vulnerability Assessment (4-2) As Needed

This course provides a basis for understanding the potential vulnerabilities in networked systems by applying a problem-solving approach to: (1) obtaining information about a remote network, (2) possibly exploiting or subverting systems residing on that network, (3) understanding the theory of operation of existing tools and libraries, along with how to measure the effectiveness of those tools, and (4) understanding tools and techniques available for vulnerability discovery and mitigation. Labs provide practical experience with current network attack and vulnerability assessment tools as well as development of new tools. Foot printing, scanning, numeration, and escalation are addressed from the attacker's perspective. A final project that demonstrates skill and knowledge is required. Prerequisites: CS3140 and CS3070 and CS3690, or consent of the instructor.

CS4679 Advances in Cyber Security Operations (4-1) As Required

Unfettered by rules, ethics, or government acquisition politics, the cyber underground has created sophisticated and innovative mechanisms for digital crime. Spanning all layers from hardware and firmware to human-computer interfaces, these command and control systems are both clandestine and dynamic. Using case studies, this course explores the techniques, tactics and procedures of cyber security operations used to identify and track emerging adversarial behavior. By addressing computer network attack, defense, and exploitation topics associated with disruptive technologies, students will gain an understanding of the threats, vulnerabilities, and appropriate mitigating security controls. Sample topics include: supply chain attacks; driving forces of the cyber underground; operations involving a variety of cyber technologies and infrastructures; tracking, location, and identification: security implications of new hardware and firmware interfaces; and covert and side channels. Based upon the choice of case studies, this course will be taught at either the unclassified or TS/SCI levels. Prerequisite: CS3690 or consent of instructor.

CS4680 Introduction to Certification and Accreditation (3-2) Fall/Spring

This course provides an in-depth instruction on the DoD/DoN security certification process. It provides an introduction to the Certification and Accreditation (C&A) process as applied to procurement and lifecycle management of DoD and federal government information systems, with a focus on the role of the Certifier. Topics include the principal C&A roles, functional components, and output documents of the C&A process. Also included is a comparison of the Government C&A process specifications currently in use (DITSCAP/NIACAP, FIPS, DCID 6/3) and the emerging effort aimed at producing a unified specification. In the laboratory portion of the course, students will do 2 or 3 case studies of information systems that have been evaluated under the current DoD criteria in preparation for accrediting to carry sensitive information. The students will study each system from concept through final system certification and accreditation. They will look at and evaluate such things as the security policies, system architecture, the system security architecture, design, implementation, deployment, management, evolution, assurances, etc. through available documentation and other evidence, to determine whether the systems were secure enough to handle the classified information at the appropriate levels of assurance. The case studies will be based on the information available about deployed systems. Prerequisites: CS3670 and either CS3690 or consent of the instructor.

CS4684 Cyber Security Incident Response and Recovery (3-2) As Required

This course defines the nature and scope of cyber security incident handling services, including intrusion/incident detection, damage control, service continuity, forensic analysis, service/data restoration, and incident reporting. Material covers policy, planning, operations, and technology issues involved in related cyber incident handling plans; i.e., Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery, and Continuity of Operations. Specific incident types addressed include, natural disasters, denial of service, malicious code, malicious misuse of hardware and firmware, unauthorized access, data compromise and inappropriate use, including insider attacks. Emphasis is given to the detection and analysis of infiltration and exfiltration techniques employed during cyber attacks, thus enabling the incident handler to detect low noise attacks, and to deconstruct particularly insidious attacks. Based upon the choice of case studies, this course will be taught at either the unclassified or TS/SCI levels. Prerequisites: CS3690 or consent of instructor.

CS4800 Directed Study in Advanced Computer Science (0-V) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Advanced group studies in computer science on a subject of mutual interest to students and faculty member. Intended primarily to permit students to pursue in-depth subjects not fully covered in formal class work or thesis research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

CS4900 Technology and Transformation I (2-0) Winter/Summer

This is a two-quarter course that supports students in the selection of thesis topics with potential for transformation. The thesis process is a microcosm of transformation processes. Topics include: meaning of transformation and innovation, innovation process, skills of innovation, selection of thesis topic, design of an effective thesis document, and organizing an effective writing process. Frequent faculty guest speakers will discuss different research areas and current problems under study. The emphasis in the first quarter is on the range of possible research, and in the second quarter on the transformation process as it applies to theses. Includes weekly readings and exercises. Prerequisite: None.

CS4901 Technology and Transformation II (2-0) Fall/Spring

This is a two-quarter course that supports students in the selection of thesis topics with potential for transformation. The thesis process is a microcosm of transformation processes. Topics include: meaning of transformation and innovation, innovation process, skills of innovation, selection of a thesis topic, design of an effective thesis document, and organizing an effective writing process. Frequent faculty guest speakers will discuss different research areas and current problems under study. The emphasis in the first quarter is on the range of possible research, and in the second quarter on the transformation process as it applies to theses. Includes weekly readings and exercises. Prerequisite: None.

CS4902 Practices of Transformation (0-2) As Required

This course will examine the current and planned research of Computer Science faculty in multiple fields of study. The course is designed to support Computer Science students in their third quarter of study in the selection of an emphasis track and an area for thesis research. Completion of this course requires submission of an approved thesis proposal during finals week. Prerequisite: Computer Science students in third quarter or consent of the department chairman.

CS4910 Advanced Readings in Computer Science (0-V) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

(Variable hours 0-2 to 0-8.) Directed readings in computer science on a subject of mutual interest to students and faculty member. The course allows in-depth study of advanced topics not fully covered in formal class work or thesis research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

CS4920 Advanced Topics in Computer Science (V-V) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support advanced group study of a subject matter of special interest, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will be drawn from areas not covered by other advanced courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic.

CS4921 Advanced Topics in Computer Science I (V-V) As Required

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support advanced group study of a subject matter of special interest, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will be drawn from areas not covered by other advanced courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic.

CS4922 Advanced Topics in Computer Science II ( V-V) As Required

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support advanced group study of a subject matter of special interest, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will be drawn from areas not covered by other advanced courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic.

CS4923 Advanced Topics in Computer Science III (V-V) As Required

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support advanced group study of a subject matter of special interest, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will be drawn from areas not covered by other advanced courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic.

CS5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) As Required

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

MV Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<MV Courses MV0810-MV3923>

MV0810 Thesis Research (0-8) As Required

MOVES Thesis Research. Prerequisite: None.

MV0820 Integrated Project (0-12) As Required

The Naval Postgraduate School provides many opportunities for students to participate in campus-wide interdisciplinary projects. These projects encourage students to conceptualize systems which respond to current and future operational requirements. An integral part of the project involves working with other groups to understand and resolve issues involved with system integration and to lend MOVES-specific expertise to these projects. This course is available to Modeling, Virtual Environment and Simulation Students who are participating in a campus-wide integrated project. Course is grade on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: None.

MV1000 Becoming a Master Learner (3-2) As Required

This course teaches fundamental skills associated with success in higher education, with a focus on improving learning strategies and self-management skills to help students better organize, prepare, and perform effectively in an academic or work environment. The course teaches students to improve study habits, develop critical thinking skills, use time management principles, hone communication skills, and develop their own individual success strategies. The course helps students understand their own cognitive processes, and what strategies work for best for them in order to improve their learning and lead them to successes academically, personally, and in their careers. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: None.

MV2920 Introductory Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (V-V) As Required

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) This course is designed to support introductory subject matter of special interest and is dependent on faculty availability. Topics will typically augment those offered in the basic core courses. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, or self-paced, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: None.

MV2921 Introduction to Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (2-0) Fall

This course is an introduction to the Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation discipline. Topics include Combat Modeling, Networked Visual Simulation, Web-Based Simulation, Agents and Cognitive Modeling, Training Systems, Human Factors, Physically Based Modeling, and Optimization. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: None.

MV3101 Introduction to Department of Defense Modeling and Simulation (4-0) Fall

This course serves as an important overview course for all students enrolled in the MOVES curricula, in addition to other curricula at NPS. It covers the origin, evolution, breadth and importance of DoD modeling and simulation (M&S), and the utilization of M&S in DoD system acquisition life cycle. The course focuses on the functional areas of DoD M&S, which are: Training, Analysis, Acquisition, Planning, Test, and Evaluation. This course also is offered as SE3101. Prerequisite: None.

MV3202 Introduction to Computer Graphics (3-2) Winter

This course introduces you to computer graphics — its powerful capabilities, a history of its technologies as well as up-to-date developments, to its far-reaching potentials across the consumer, industrial, and military domains, and how to achieve these potentials. You will learn about the principles of hardware and software used to create computer-generated images, about basic rendering and raytracing, 3D graphics programming in OpenGL, lighting and shading, textures, and scene graph architectures. MV3202 prepares you to design and implement 3D graphics simulations and to understand the theory of modern graphics rendering. The course is intended for students who have taken a basic course in, or have recent programming experience in, a programming language such as C++ or Java. Prerequisite: None.

MV3203 Graphical Simulation (3-2) Spring

Teaches the theory and techniques relevant to rapid construction of small to medium sized graphical simulations using existing simulation platforms, such as Delta3D, VBS2, Unreal, etcetera, including web browsers with plug-ins for Flash or X3D: For use as a stimulus for human performance experiments; as partial task trainers; as visualizations to support analysis; as testbeds for new hardware or software technology. Prerequisite: MV3202.

MV3204 Computer Graphics Modeling Using X3D/VRML (4-0) Fall

This course provides an introduction to the principles of hardware and software used for computer-generated 3-D graphics via the World Wide Web. The focus of the course is authoring interactive 3-D scenes and a major design project. The course is intended for MOVES and Computer Science students working in visual simulation, or students in other majors interested in the basics of 3-D modeling and rendering. Prerequisites: CS2971 and CS2073, or equivalent.

MV3250 Introduction to Extensible Markup Language (XML) (4-0) Fall

XML and related technologies provide platform independent representation, description, and validation of data. This is necessary for the data communication among different networks, computers, and applications that is essential for contemporary military and civilian applications. The course will present the benefits of XML and how to use software tools to construct and process XML documents using XML editors, XML parsers, XML Schema for validation, XSLT to transform documents, and DOM, SAX, and JDOM to access and manipulate XML documents within a computer program. Much of the programming code in contemporary computer applications that is used to construct data files, access databases and spreadsheets, check and validate data values, and output data can be replaced by these more general software tools. Prerequisite: None.

MV3302 Introduction to Discrete Event Simulation Modeling (4-1) Summer

This course provides an introduction to Discrete Event Simulation (DES) methodology, modeling, and analysis. Use of DES formalism, such as Event Graph methodology, for design of models. Component-based implementation of event graph models on a platform such as Simkit. Use of simulation components for building models using composition. DES modeling of movement and sensing. Random variate generation. Simple output analysis. Prerequisites: Java programming, at the level of CS2973, CS3773, or equivalent; or permission of instructor; Basic Probability and Statistics at the level of OA3101 and OA3103.

MV3403 Research Methods and Statistics for Healthcare Simulation (3-1) Fall

This course focuses on common research and statistical methods used to assess performance in simulated healthcare environments. Research methods covered include differences between surveys, observational studies, and experiments, sampling procedures, instrumentation, reliability and validity, ethical requirements in conducting human subjects research, and the components of a grant proposal. Statistical methods include hypothesis testing, t-tests, z-tests, ANOVA, regression, and chi square methods. Labs will be conducted using appropriate statistical software that will provide students with hands-on understanding of many of the statistical methods covered in lecture. Prerequisites: None.

MV3472 Graphical Simulation of Physical Systems in Virtual Worlds (3-2) Spring

Design and construction of reusable software modules for real-time computer simulation of physical systems in graphical virtual worlds. Rigid body kinematics and dynamics, perspective transformations, and wire-frame graphical models. Time domain and transform domain analysis of linearized dynamic systems. Laboratory is concerned with development and testing of software. Prerequisites: CS2020 or CS2971 or CS2973 or equivalent; MA3042 or consent of the instructor.

MV3500 Internetwork Communications and Simulation (3-2) Summer

An introduction to network communications in simulation applications. Topics include an introduction to the TCP/IP protocol stack; TCP/IP socket communications, including TCP, UDP, and multicast; and protocol design issues, with emphasis on Distributed Interactive Simulation and High Level Architecture. The emphasis will be on Windows and Web-browser applications. Prerequisites: CS2971 and CS2173.

MV3800 Directed Study in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (0-V) As Required

Individual research and study by the student under the supervision of a member of the faculty. The course is intended primarily to permit interested students to pursue in-depth subjects not fully covered in formal class work. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. Variable hours 0-2 to 0-8. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

MV3920 Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (V-V) As Required

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support s subject matter of special interest, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will either be drawn from areas not covered by core courses or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

MV3922 Introduction to Virtual Environmental Technology (2-0) Winter

This course is an introduction to the technology used in virtual environments and discusses applications that use virtual environments. It is intended to give the students an introduction to the items they are likely to use throughout the master's degree program in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (MOVES). Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: MV2921.

MV3923 Introduction to Research in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (2-0) Spring

This course will examine the current and planned research of Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (MOVES) faculty in multiple fields of study. The course is designed to support MOVES students in the selection of emphasis blocks and an area for thesis research. Includes readings and exercises. Prerequisite: MV3922.

<MV Courses MV4000-MV4302>

MV4000 Hamming: Learning to Learn (3-2) Summer

Richard W. Hamming's original capstone course, EC4000, “Learning to Learn: Future of Science and Engineering” has been fully digitized and placed online. This course presents the distilled career insights of a preeminent thinker. In 1968, Dr. Hamming was the recipient of the Turing Award, the highest honor in computer science, for his work on numerical methods, automatic coding systems, and error-detecting and error-correcting codes. This course is intended to instill a "style of thinking" that will enhance one's ability to function as a problem solver of complex technical issues. With respect, students sometimes called the course "Hamming on Hamming" because he relates many research collaborations, discoveries, inventions, and achievements of his own. This collection of stories and carefully distilled insights relates how those discoveries came about. Most importantly, these presentations provide objective analysis of the thought processes and reasoning that took place as Dr. Hamming, his associates, and other major thinkers in computer science and electronics progressed through the grand challenges of science and engineering in the twentieth century. Prerequisite: None.

MV4001 Human Factors of Virtual Environments (4-1) Fall

This course focuses on human factors issues in virtual environments (VEs). While the similarities of VEs to the real world can often make VE interfaces intuitive and easy to use, the differences between VEs and the real world can often be the cause of serious performance problems and physical inability to effectively use a system. The design of effective VE systems depends on an understanding of humans and their interaction with their environment. Only then can a VE system hope to achieve reasonable performance levels and acceptability. This course will survey the VE literature on issues of human performance, perception, cognition, multimodal interfaces, locomotion, wayfinding, object selection and manipulation, visualization, simulator sickness, and performance differences between individuals. Prerequisite: None.

MV4002 Simulation and Training (4-1) Winter

This course focuses on training issues in virtual environments (VEs). VEs have often been considered to be general purpose trainers. However, systems are often built without an understanding of how to build a trainer that can verify that it improves subsequent performance without forming bad habits or other reverse training artifacts. This course will first investigate VE training systems from a theoretical perspective, focusing on learning, memory, and cognition. From this framework, actual training systems will be studied with the focus being on an actual study of training transfer of a real training system. Prerequisite: None.

MV4003 Technology and Simulation in Healthcare Education (3-1) Spring

This distance learning course exposes students to the full breadth of medical simulation technologies used to train healthcare-related tasks, recreate physiologic conditions and disease states, assess domain knowledge, and support review and/or archiving. An integral part of the course is participation in a hands-on simulation practicum. The course combines structured asynchronous independent study, on-line discussion forums, post-and-assess peer-learning exercises, and weekly synchronous 'office hours' with subject matter experts (physicians, nurses, medical technology specialists) and the NPS course facilitator. Prerequisites: None.

MV4015 Agent-Based Autonomous Behavior for Simulations (4-2) Winter

Covers the concepts and skills required to apply agent-based programming to models and simulations of complex adaptive systems (CAS). Concepts covered will include: complex systems—especially their properties of path dependence, sensitivity to initial conditions, emergence of self-organized structure, adaptation to a changing environment, and criteria for evaluation model or simulation fidelity; distinctions between agent-based methods and other kinds of programming; goal-directed behavior and decision making; situational reasoning and the elements of rational behavior. The course will survey specific works and key contributors to this subject: John Holland, Complexity Science at the Santa Fe Institute, Artificial Life, Brian Arthur (the El Farol Problem and Bounded Rationality), SWARM, Sugarscape, ISAAC, Daniel Dennett (Intentionality), and Richard Dawkins. Within this conceptual and historical framework, the course will emphasize design, specification, and programming skills that will equip the student to know when and how to apply agent-based methods to models and simulations. The programming skills will involve genetic algorithms, classifier systems, applications of game theory and reinforcement learning, and the treatment of collaboration and defection in groups. Finally, the course will discuss agent-based simulations in the context of distributed, virtual environments. Prerequisite: None.

MV4025 Cognitive Behavioral Modeling for Simulations (3-2) Summer

This course focuses on the primary technologies used to model cognition and behavior in order to create agents that represent human beings in simulations. Topics include the dominant technologies in use, the tools used to support them, and their application to the various capabilities required of an agent. The modeling technologies covered include the production-system approaches common in artificial intelligence/cognitive science/psychology, as well as the finite-state, automata-inspired approaches that are part of engineering practice in computer-generated force simulations and the computer entertainment industry. The full scope of the modeling problem will be addressed, from sensation and perception through situation awareness and action selection, to action execution. Approaches to modeling communication and behavior moderators (e.g., experience, emotion, fatigue) will also be discussed. Prerequisite: CS3310.

MV4030 Modeling and Simulation in Ocean Environments (3-2) Spring

This course focuses on modeling and simulation (M&S) issues in ocean environments. While virtual environments (VEs) serve as M&S tools, the design of effective VE systems needs realistic physical environments. This course will cover the basic physics of ocean environments, visualization of the ocean from satellites, visualization of the ocean from Navy METOC model output, METOC information flow in M&S, the impact of the environment on human behavior, and physically-based modeling. Prerequisite: None.

MV4100 Cognitive Engineering (4-1) Winter

This course is about a cognitive approach to engineering systems. It is partly about artificial intelligence and agent-based technologies, and partly about human-computer interaction. The objective is to build intelligent interactive systems where we maximize the performance and capabilities of the combined human-machine system. Prerequisite: None.

MV4205 Advanced 3-D Modeling with X3D/VRML (4-0) Winter

This course teaches advanced principles and practice of web-based 3D computer graphics using X3D (formerly the Virtual Reality Modeling Language, VRML). Examples and class projects are typically oriented to problems of military or scientific interest. Topics include event scripting, optimized geometry representations, prototype extensibility, X3D Earth geospatial models, humanoid animation and IEEE Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) networking. Prerequisite: MV3204 or approval of the instructor.

MV4250 Advanced Extensible Markup Language (XML) Authoring and Design (4-0) Summer

MV4250 presents advanced principles and practices for Web-based document design and authoring using XML data structures, XML applications, and XML-based languages. Examples and class projects are typically oriented to problems of broad Navy, military, or scientific interest. Because this new course deals with principles of all Web-based languages, and since XML authoring tools are becoming more intuitive and accessible, MV4250 will be of interest to many other departments and curricula. Prerequisites: OA3250 and MV3250, or sufficient background knowledge of XML.

MV4302 Advanced Discrete Event Simulation Modeling (3-2) Winter

This course is an in-depth study of modern methods of Discrete Event Simulation (DES) modeling. The focus will be on learning advanced methods for designing and implementing DES models using the most current methodologies, including component-based simulation modeling, listener design patterns, XML and Web-based models. Students will implement a nontrivial DES model of military relevance as a final project. Prerequisite: OA3302.

<MV Courses MV4460-MV5810>

MV4460 Management of Modeling and Simulation Development (4-0) Summer

The purpose of this course is to prepare MOVES students to manage large-scale modeling and simulation projects. The course traces the development life cycle of modeling and simulation systems, including, but not limited to, project management, measurement, life cycle models, requirements, implementation, testing, verification, and deployment of large-scale systems typical of DoD acquisition. Prerequisite: None.

MV4470 Image Synthesis (3-2) Spring

This course covers advanced topics in computer image generation. The focus of the course is quality and realism in computer image synthesis. Topics include illumination, shading, transparency, antialiasing, shadows, raytracing, radiosity, texture mapping, and parametric surfaces. Labs are directed towards providing students with experience working with scene graph architecture. Prerequisites: CS2173 and MV3202, or consent of the instructor.

MV4471 Computer Animation (3-2) Winter

This course covers advanced topics in state-of-the-art, animated, 3-D, computer models. Computational techniques for real-time animation, motion control, interactive key-frame systems, kinematic methods for figure animation, dynamics for figure animation, soft object animation, procedural animation and other high-level approaches will be examined. Labs utilize state-of-the-art animation software and equipment. Prerequisite: MV3202 or MV3204 or consent of the instructor.

MV4472 Physics for Game Developers and Virtual Environments (3-2) Spring

This course enables you to produce convincing graphical virtual reality representations of the motion of vehicles and human actors or avatars. Basic linear algebra and vector-matrix calculus are explained, and the ANSI Common Lisp programming language is used, in the context of examples. This is a hands-on, project-oriented course. After studying basic topics, each student will focus on developing and presenting an individual project during the second part of the course. Prerequisite: MV3472 or equivalent.

MV4474 Virtual Environment Network and Software Architecture (3-2) Spring

This course covers the design and implementation of network and software architectures for real-time, interactive 3-D virtual environments (VEs). Network architecture topics include a taxonomy for networked virtual environments, distributed interactive simulation protocols (DIS and HLA), virtual reality modeling language (VRML), agent-based network protocols (Java/Telescript), proposed solutions for large-scale networked virtual environments (area of interest managers and object brokers), multicast backbone tools and developments, and virtual reality transfer protocol proposals. Software architecture topics include representative software architectures for VEs (NPSNET, DIVE, MASSIVE, etc.), commercial toolkits for VE development (WorldToolKit, Division's dvs, Performer, etc.), lag in multiprocessor virtual environments, and the HCI implications on VE network and software architectures. Prerequisite: MV3500 or consent of the instructor.

MV4501 Simulation Application Practicum (2-4) Summer

This course provides students with extensive laboratory experience applying simulations to address a defense capability gap using simulation-based system. The application domain will be selected from a representative simulation application domains (e.g. training, analysis, acquisition, experimentation). Students will analyze a specified need, develop requirements, objectives, and standards of system and human performance, select a simulation platform, develop additional infrastructure and environments needed to accomplish identified needs and objectives, test their solution, analyze its effectiveness and define recommendations for potential system re-design. Prerequisite: MV4002.

MV4502 Simulation Development Practicum (2-4) Fall

This course provides the students the opportunity to work directly with a full scale, deployed combat simulation. This class has two main objectives. The first is to gain a deeper understanding of the inner structure of modern combat simulation systems. This goes beyond just looking at conceptual descriptions of the components to looking at the implementation intricacies that make such systems work. The second is as a practicum to provide students experience with all of the processes involved in the development of simulation software. This includes requirements definition, test and evaluation and software design and implementation. The intent is to have the students gain hands on experience in all aspects of these processes. By looking at a deployed system that is being used by the Marine Corps and Army, the students will develop an appreciation for the issues that are encountered in the real world that are often masked in purely pedagogical examples. Prerequisites: MV4025, MV3302.

MV4503 Simulation Interoperability Practicum (2-4) Winter

This course provides students with hands-on experience with the issues around connecting live, virtual, and constructive simulations into a single federation. Students will deepen their understanding of High Level Architecture down to the Federation Object Model and Simulation Object Model level. They will encounter data and timing incompatibility issues, and learn the tools and techniques currently used to resolve them. They will develop a practical understanding of information assurance requirements on simulations and how they can be addressed. Prerequisite: MV3500.

MV4655 Introduction to Joint Combat Modeling (4-0) As Required

This course covers the basic tools and concepts of joint combat modeling. Both the science and the art are emphasized. Topics include: the role of combat modeling in analyses, taxonomies of models, an introduction to some important models and organizations, measures of effectiveness, approaches to effectively using models to assist decision making, object-oriented approaches to designing entities to simulate, firing theory, one-on-one and few-on-few engagements, introduction to aggregated force-on-force modeling (including the basic Lanchester model and some of its derivatives), sensing algorithms, simulation entity decision making, simulating C4ISR processes, terrain and movement algorithms, verification, validation, and accreditation (VV&A), stochastic versus deterministic representations, hierarchies of models, and variable resolution modeling. The primary course objective is for you to understand the enduring fundamentals of how combat models are built and used to support decision making. This will be done, in part, through several small projects that will require students to design, implement, and analyze models. Prerequisites: Probability and Statistics (through third course in the sequence), familiarity with a programming language (Java recommended), Stochastic Models (OA3301), Calculus, and concurrent instruction in computer simulation (e.g., OA3302).

MV4657 Modeling and Simulation for Stability, Security, Transition, and Reconstruction (SSTR) Operations (3-2) Fall/Spring

The purpose of this course is to explore the challenges of modeling non-traditional combat for today's war fighters. This course investigates issues, challenges, and opportunities for application of modeling and simulation (M&S) to military support for Stability, Security, Transition, and Reconstruction (SSTR) operations. The course considers application of M&S for SSTR from the perspectives of analysis, training, acquisition, and mission planning/rehearsal. Students are given hands-on experience with current and emerging SSTR M&S simulations and computational tools. Meet prerequisites or consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: MV4655.

MV4800 Directed Studies in Advanced Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (0-V) As Required

Advanced group studies in modeling, virtual environments, and simulation on a subject of mutual interest to students and faculty member. The primary intent of this course is to permit students to pursue in-depth subjects not fully covered in formal class work or thesis research. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. The variable credit hours are 0-2 to 0-8. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

MV4900 Research Seminar in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (0-2) As Required

A seminar series designed to give a broad-brush introduction to MOVES. Presentations include the major areas of MOVES and are presented by subject matter experts within MOVES. Also covered are ongoing research projects within MOVES at NPS and around the world. All first and second quarter MOVES students are required to take this course. Prerequisite: None.

MV4910 Advanced Readings in Advanced Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (0-V) As Required

(Variable credit hours 0-2 to 0-8.) This course is centered on directed readings in modeling, virtual environments, and simulation on a subject of mutual interest to students and faculty member. The course allows in-depth study of advanced topics not fully covered in formal class work or thesis research. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. The course can be taken either Pass/Fail or graded. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

MV4920 Advanced Topics in Advanced Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (V-V) As Required

(Variable credit hours 2-4 to 4-1.) This course is designed to support the advanced group study of a subject matter of special interest, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will be drawn from areas not covered by other advanced courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic.

MV4924 Current Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (1-1) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

The course is designed to provide breadth in MOVES not normally provided by other classroom material, as well as focus in major areas of MOVES. Faculty and research staff attend class sessions, providing the opportunity to interact with a broad group once a week, and with a focused group of the student's choosing once a week. Course is expected to be repeated and is required of all MOVES students every quarter starting with their fourth quarter in the curriculum. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Includes student presentations and readings. Prerequisite: MV3923.

MV4925 Advanced Rendering Techniques for Visual Simulation (2-3) Summer

Currently, the number of transistors on a certain consumer-level graphics processing units exceeds the number of transistors on a Pentium IV processor. Until recently, however, programming these powerful units has been done using a limited assembly-like instruction set targeted for a specific vendor's hardware. This has made cinematic effects difficult to program, update, and transport. Recent developments such as High Level Shading Language (HLSL), Nvidia's C for Graphics (CG), and the OpenGL 2.0 specification could revolutionize the process of programming GPUs. This class will provide an overview of current technology and will explore in-depth its application to DoD. Prerequisite: MV4470 or consent of the instructor.

MV4930 Advanced Topics in Advanced Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (0-2) As Required

This course is part of the seminar series in advanced research topics in MOVES. Topics are drawn from current student thesis research, funded research projects, proposed research projects, and other research directions within the MOVES Institute. This course is required by all MOVES students in their second quarter and beyond, as well as all CS Graphics Track students. Presentations are made by M.S. and Ph.D. students, as well as by MOVES faculty and researchers. This course may be repeated multiple times. Prerequisite: None.

MV5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) As Required

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

SW Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<SW Courses SW0810-SW4583>

SW0810 Thesis Research (0-8) As Required

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course.

SW2920 Introductory Topics in Software Engineering (V-V) As Required

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support introductory subject matters of special interest in software engineering, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will typically augment those offered in the basic core courses. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, or self-paced, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

SW3460 Software Methodology (2-1) Winter/Summer

The course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of software engineering and methods for requirements definition, design, and testing of software. Specific topics include introduction to the software life cycle, basic concepts and principles of software engineering, object-oriented methods for requirements analysis, software design, and development. Prerequisite: OO programming experience (CS2020) or consent of instructor.

SW3800 Directed Study in Software Engineering (0-V) As Required

(Variable hours 0-2 to 0-8.) Individual research and study by the student under the supervision of a member of the faculty. The course is intended primarily to permit interested students to pursue in-depth subjects not fully covered in formal class work. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

SW3920 Topics in Software Engineering (V-V) As Required

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support subject matters of special interest in software engineering, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will either be drawn from areas not covered by core courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

SW4150 Programming Tools and Environments (4-0) As Required

This course covers the design and implementation of tools to aid software development, including syntax-directed editors, version-control systems, language-oriented debuggers, symbolic execution vehicles, programming databases, type checkers, and automatic programming tools. These topics are discussed in the context of an integrated, language-oriented, programming environment. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4500 Introduction to Formal Methods in Software Engineering (3-1) Fall

This course covers formal methods for specification and analysis of software systems. The course introduces application of mathematical logic to software design, program verification, and formal specification languages. The laboratory sessions will cover special topics and case studies. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4510 Computer-Aided Prototyping (3-0) As Required

This course covers the concept and application of computer-aided prototyping to the development and acquisition of DoD software systems. Specific topics include the prototyping software life cycle, system models, design methods, automatic code generation, prototyping languages and tools, and their unique systematic system for increasing productivity, reliability, and portability of software development in comparison with other development methods. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4520 Advanced Software Engineering (3-0) As Required

This course covers methods for specifying, designing, and analyzing software systems, with emphasis on automatable techniques and their mathematical basis. The techniques are applied to construct and check programs using a formal specification language. The course concludes with a summary of current research areas in software engineering. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

SW4530 Software Engineering Research and Development in DoD (3-1) Summer

This course builds on the material covered in SW4500. Fundamental principles of computer system/network security and distributed computing are covered, along with advanced methods, techniques, and standards aimed at improving the development and acquisition of DoD software systems. Specific topics include: the application of software engineering principles for designing large, secure, embedded real-time computer systems; the application of software engineering principles for the design of distributed systems; automated tools for the specification, design, and generation of code for applications; and existing and emerging standards for software development, security, and acquisition. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4540 Software Testing (3-1) Spring

This course covers the theory and practice of testing computer software with the intent of preventing, finding, and eliminating bugs in software. Planning and executing software tests are covered, including requirements-based testing, functional testing, static analysis, code reading, symbolic testing, structural testing, and advanced testing techniques. These topics are discussed in the context of a realistic development environment, illustrated using a variety of software testing tools. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4555 Engineering Network Centric Systems (3-1) As Required

This course covers the concepts, methods, techniques, and tools for engineering the development of network centric systems. Specific topics include the evolution of client/server models to distributed objects, an introduction to and comparison of CORBA/OpenDoc and OLE/COM, intelligent software agents, application development in distributed environments, security issues in network centric computing, and DoD software system development. Prerequisite: SW3460.

SW4560 Software Evolution (3-0) Fall

This course covers the concepts, methods, techniques, and tools for supporting the evolution and maintenance of software systems. Specific topics include the use of formal specifications to support software evolution, design databases, configuration management, software change merging, and software re-engineering. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4570 Software Reuse (3-0) Spring

This course covers the concepts, methods, techniques, and tools for systematic reuse of software components and systems. Specific topics include design and re-engineering for reuse, mechanisms for enhancing reuse, domain specific reuse and software architectures, reuse of requirements models, specifications and designs, tools for reuse, software library organization, and methods for component search. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4580 Design of Embedded Real-Time Systems (3-0) Summer

This course covers the concepts, methods, techniques, and tools for supporting the design of embedded real-time systems. Specific topics include real-time systems and concurrency models, object-oriented methods for real-time system design, real-time scheduling, and programming language support for concurrent and real-time systems. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4581 Software Reliability (3-1) Fall

This course covers the concepts, methods, and techniques for evaluating and improving the engineering of software reliability. Specific topics include system-level dependability and reliability modeling concepts; software reliability prediction and estimation models and metrics; and techniques for model evaluation, fault/failure forecasting, fault removal, fault prevention, and fault tolerance. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4582 Weapon System Software Safety (3-1) Fall

This course provides an introduction to software system safety. The course covers the principles and processes of system safety engineering, including the basics of hazard analysis and risk assessment. Emphasis is placed in this course on both planning and managing acquisition programs involving safety-critical software. Concepts and principles are applied to the acquisition of weapon systems. An advanced course in system safety is offered as SW4920. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4583 Principles of Software Design (3-1) Winter

The course is designed to teach students the role of design in software engineering. Specific topics include the software system design process, design qualities, principles and strategies, design models, design methods, and the use of patterns in the design of object-oriented software systems. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

<SW Courses SW4590-SW5810>

SW4590 Software Architecture (3-1) Winter

This course covers both high- and low-level software architectures, including software patterns and pattern-oriented architectures, from the module level through the enterprise level. Where appropriate, we examine formalisms, and actual software architecture practice. Special attention is given to interoperability of architectural components. Case studies of existing DoD systems are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4591 Requirements Engineering (3-1) Spring

This is an in-depth treatment of requirements engineering concepts, methods, and tools. The role of requirements engineering within software engineering is explored, as well as consistency, cost-benefit analysis, resolving multiple viewpoints, dependency tracing, and automated decision support. Topics are reinforced with examples from DoD applications. Prototyping is introduced as a means of assessing requirements early in the design process. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4592 Software Risk Assessment in DoD (3-1) Summer

This course introduces concepts, techniques, and tools for software risk management. The course examines various risks of software practice and evaluates them in terms of mathematical models (e.g., probability theory). Students learn techniques for mitigating, avoiding, and handling risks throughout the software life cycle. The course depends on software metrics; we also look at reliability theory and its application to software risk management. Prerequisite: SW3460 or consent of the instructor.

SW4593 Advanced Logic and Algebra for Software R&D in DoD (3-1) As Required

The aim of this course is to present fundamentals of advanced logic and algebra for software R&D. Specific topics include equational specifications, algebra, characterization of equation classes, the equation calculus, term rewriting, first and second order logic, temporal logic, model theory, and generalized induction. Prerequisite: SW4500 or consent of the instructor.

SW4594 Formal Models for Software Automation (3-1) As Required

This course covers the concepts, methods, techniques, and tools for designing and developing systems. Specific topics include the use of knowledge-based tools for software evolution and techniques for specification, methods for program derivation and generation, domain-specific program synthesis techniques, and cognitive and planning approaches to software design. Prerequisite: SW4500.

SW4595 Lightweight Inference Techniques (3-1) As Required

This course covers the fundamental principles and technologies for automated decision support and automated software evolution with an emphasis on techniques for lightweight inference. Specific topics include: decision support systems, software evolution systems, gaps in existing technology that prevent automation, models and methods for lightweight inference, and state of the art theory and practice. Prerequisite: SW4500 or consent of the instructor.

SW4596 Algorithm Design and Analysis in Software Engineering (3-1) As Required

This course covers algorithm design and analysis in software engineering. Specific topics include advanced data structures (such as Binomial Heaps and Fibonacci Heaps), graph algorithms (such as minimum spanning trees, maximum flow, all-pairs shortest paths, and single-source shortest paths), and advanced design and analysis techniques (such as dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, linear programming, and amortized analysis). Prerequisite: SW4500 or consent of the instructor.

SW4597 Robust Generation of Control Software (3-1) As Required

This course covers the concepts, methods, techniques, and tools needed to methodically generate robust software for system control. Specific topics include specification and analysis of control requirements, hard and soft real-time constraints, embedded software control, code generation, software reliability through software reuse and redundancy, and DoD requirements for control systems. A survey of computer-aided tools that support the generation of robust systems is provided. Prerequisite: SW4500 or consent of the instructor.

SW4598 Software Merging and Slicing Techniques (3-1) As Required

The fundamental concepts, methods, and tools for software merging and slicing are covered in this course, with applications to software evolution, configuration management, and testing. This is followed by advanced topics including recent advancements in this field. Prerequisite: None.

SW4599 Automated Software/Hardware Integration in DoD (3-1) As Required

Automated software/hardware integration is a key problem for current software development in DoD. This course covers some important aspects of this field, including software prototyping, interface integration, data integration, and control integration. Automatable decision support methods for software/hardware integration are also discussed. Prerequisite: SW4500 or consent of the instructor.

SW4600 Automata, Formal Specification, and Run-Time Verification (3-1) Fall

This course focuses on run-time monitoring and verification, a practical software verification technique based on automata and formal specifications. The automata section consists of finite automata (deterministic and nondeterministic), languages, and regular expressions. The formal specification section consists of temporal logics, real-time and time-series constraint specification, statecharts, and TLCharts. The run-time verification section will cover the practical application of formal specifications to monitoring and verification of safety critical systems. The course combines theory, examples, and practical, student-driven projects. After taking this course, students will know how to apply formal specifications and run-time verification to improve the dependability of defense systems. Prerequisites: CS3150 and MA2025.

SW4800 Directed Study in Advanced Software Engineering (0-V) As Required

(Variable hours 0-2 to 0-8.) Advanced group studies in software engineering on a subject of mutual interest to students and faculty member. Intended primarily to permit students to pursue in-depth subjects not fully covered in formal class work or thesis research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

SW4900 Research Seminar in Advanced Software Engineering (0-2) As Required

This course will examine the current and planned research of software engineering faculty. The course is designed to support software engineering students in the selection of an area for thesis research. Completion of this course requires submission of an approved thesis proposal during finals week. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: None.

SW4910 Advanced Readings in Software Engineering (0-V) As Required

(Variable hours 0-2 to 0-8.) Directed readings in software engineering on a subject of mutual interest to students and faculty member. The course allows in-depth study of advanced topics not fully covered in formal class work or thesis research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Can be taken Pass/Fail or graded. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

SW4920 Advanced Topics in Software Engineering (V-V) Winter

(Variable hours 2-4 to 4-1.) Designed to support advanced group study of a subject matter of special interest in software engineering, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will be drawn from areas not covered by other advanced courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic.

SW4931 Core Area of Software Engineering Doctoral Studies (3-2) As Required

Designed to prepare Ph.D. students for the core area of the Software Engineering written qualifying examination - software development process and techniques. It introduces the most important references from each subject areas, highlights the important issues in each area, and helps students become familiar with the Software Engineering research. Topics covered include: software life cycle models; software engineering concepts and principles; specification and verification of software - modeling, analysis, and assessment; design of large software systems - architectures, patterns, and protocols; maintenance of large software systems - reengineering, transformations, recovering specs and rationale. Intended for Software Engineering PhD students. Prerequisite: SW4930 or consent of instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

SW4932 Advanced Area of Software Engineering Doctoral Studies (3-2) As Required

Designed to prepare Ph.D. students for the advanced area of the Software Engineering written qualifying examination - software automation. It introduces the most important references from each subject areas, highlights the important issues in each area, and helps students become familiar with the Software Engineering research. Topics covered include: reducing coding efforts - program generation, synthesis techniques, static checking; computer-aided prototyping - models, languages, methods; software reuse - search methods, library organization; software evolution - models, automation methods, merging and slicing; domain specific systems - real-time systems. Intended for Software Engineering PhD students. Prerequisite: SW4931 or consent of instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

SW4933 Supporting Areas of Software Engineering Doctoral Studies (3-2) As Required

A seminar designed to prepare Ph.D. students for the supporting areas of the Software Engineering written qualifying examination. Topics covered include: Computer science - mathematical fundamentals, algorithms and data structures, compilation technology, artificial intelligence, and security: management and economics - project planning and management, quality assurance, software economics, knowledge bases, decision support, and fundamentals for system modeling; computer systems - real-time systems, networks and distributed systems, hardware/software integration, interoperability of network based systems, computer graphics and interfaces and signal processing and embedded control systems. Intended for Software Engineering PhD students. Prerequisite: SW4932 of consent of instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

SW4934 Application of Advanced Concepts in Software Engineering (3-2) Spring

An advanced seminar designed to assist Ph.D. students to prepare for their written qualifying examination through a combination of lectures and problem-solving sessions. Intended for Software Engineering Ph.D. students. Students may repeat this course for credit. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

SW4935 Software Engineering Dissertation Proposal Preparation (3-0) As Required

A seminar designed to introduce Ph.D. students to the open problems in software engineering and teach students the skills to identify research topics; find, read and analyze relevant parts of the research literature; and present their findings in the form of research proposals. Intended for Software Engineering Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: SW4934.

SW4936 Seminar on Solving Software Engineering Research Problems (3-0) As Required

A seminar designed to assist Ph.D. students in preparing for their oral qualifying examination through a combination of lectures, assigned readings, student presentations, and problem-solving sessions. Intended for Software Engineering Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: SW4934.

SW4937 Software Engineering Dissertation Research (4-0) As Required

A seminar designed to provide a forum for Ph.D. students to present work in progress and critique each other's results. Intended for Software Engineering Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: None.

SW4938 Communicating Research Results in Software Engineering (4-0) As Required

A seminar designed to provide a forum for Ph.D. students to present their dissertations and critique each other's work. Intended for Software Engineering Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: None.

SW5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) As Required

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

Healthcare Modeling & Simulation Certificate -- Curriculum 240 (DL)

Program Officer

CDR Joseph Sullivan, USN, Ph.D.

Code CS/Js, Watkins Hall, Room 271

(831) 656-7562, DSN 756-7562

sullivan@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Rudy Darken, Ph.D.

Code CS/Rd, Watkins Hall, Room 384

(831) 656-7588, DSN 756-7588

darken@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Naval Postgraduate School, in collaboration with the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, have collaborated to design and deliver a distance learning educational program for healthcare simulation professionals. This program focuses on the effective use of modeling and simulation in the healthcare domain. The materials developed have been reviewed and incorporated into an efficient, interactive, fast-paced certificate program for working professionals.

The certificate requires the completion of four courses, comprising 16 credit hours of work at the graduate level. These courses form a coherent sequence to equip the certificate student with the core skills necessary to manage a modeling and simulation education and research program which can be completed in 12 months.

Convenes

Fall

Required Courses

Cyber Security Fundamentals Certificate -- Curriculum 256 (DL), Curriculum 257 (RES)

Program Manager

Cynthia Irvine, Ph.D.

Code CS/Ic, Glasgow East, Room 211

(831) 656-2461, DSN 756-2461

irvine@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Cyber Security Fundamentals graduate certificate is intended to provide a technically rigorous foundation upon which to build knowledge and skills in computer network defense, attack and exploitation. Each course is comprised of both instruction and laboratory exercises involving cyber security aspects of computers and networks. These synergistic activities allow students to internalize key concepts in cyber security. The courses and material covered in the Cyber Security Fundamentals certificate satisfy prerequisite requirements for advanced courses in cyber security offered in the Computer Science Department of the Naval Postgraduate School. In addition, the Cyber Security Fundamentals certificate satisfies requirements for the following Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) certificates: CNSSI 4011, CNSSI 4013, and CNSSI 41014 for which NPS was recertified on 31 July 2008.

All four of the courses in the sequence are extracted from the current set of graduate courses in the Computer and Network Security specialization track offered by the CS Department. Of these, three are core track courses. The total number of NPS graduate credits obtained for the certificate is up to 13.5, where laboratory credits are counted as half. This certificate program can also be applied toward a master's degree program, e.g. Curriculum 368.

Convenes

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

Required Courses

CS3600

or

CS4600

(4-2)

 

(3-2)

Introduction to Computer Security

Secure System Principles

CS3670

(3-2)

Secure Management of Systems

CS3690

or

CS3695

(4-1)

 

(3-2)

Network Security

 

Network Vulnerability Assessment

Cyber Security Defense Certificate -- Curriculum 258 (DL), Curriculum 259 (RES)

Program Manager

Cynthia Irvine, Ph.D.

Code CS/Ic, Glasgow East, Room 211

(831) 656-2461, DSN 756-2461

irvine@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Using the foundation established through the Cyber Security Fundamentals certificate, students enrolled in Cyber Security Defense graduate certificate, will obtain a detailed understanding of and ability to function in real operational situations involving cyber security. They will gain the technical depth required to actively prepare for and respond to attacks. Students will learn to analyze network traffic to extract the observable characteristics of networks and network devices, thus providing a basis for defensive strategies. They will learn to build tools and how to configure systems and networks to permit systems to foster resiliency and continuity of operations, perhaps with reduced capacity, through attacks. Students will learn how to construct systems and tools to mitigate the impact of malicious software. Students will learn forensic techniques to retrieve and analyze stored information that may be corrupted or hidden. Considerable programming and hands-on work with systems and networks will be required. Entire courses, or units within them, may be taught at the classified level, thus facilitating classroom discussions on emerging challenges and capabilities.

Students entering this program are expected to have a strong foundation in cyber security and networking. In addition, entering students will be expected to understand and use the languages and techniques of operating system and network component development: the C programming language, assembly, shell scripting, use of linkers, loaders, and debuggers.

The total number of NPS graduate credits obtained for the certificate is 12, where laboratory credits are counted as half. This certificate program can also be applied toward a master's degree program, e.g. Curriculum 368.

Convenes

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

Required Courses

CS4558

(3-2)

Network Traffic Analysis

CS4677

(3-3)

Computer Forensics

CS4684

or

CS4600

(3-2)

 

(3-2)

Cyber Security Incident Response and Recovery

Secure Systems Principles

Cyber Security Adversarial Techniques Certificate -- Curriculum 260 (DL), Curriculum 261 (RES)

Program Manager

Cynthia Irvine, Ph.D.

Code CS/Ic, Glasgow East, Room 211

(831) 656-2461, DSN 756-2461

irvine@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Using the foundation established through the Cyber Security Fundamentals certificate, students enrolled in Cyber Security Adversarial Techniques graduate certificate, will obtain a detailed understanding of and ability to function in real operational situations in which adversarial techniques are being used. An understanding of overarching principles, computer and network architectural concepts, and exemplar cases will allow students to analyze current and future malware. Students will learn how to use network traffic analysis to extract the characteristics of ongoing attacks and to identify exploitable vulnerabilities. They will learn how to decipher subtle, clandestine host-based attack mechanisms and how these mechanisms are inserted into target systems. They will learn, in detail, how attack and exploitation software mechanisms are built and deployed, including the distributed command and control techniques used to manage large-scale malware networks. Considerable programming and hands-on work with systems and networks will be required. Entire courses, or units within them, may be taught at the classified level, thus facilitating classroom discussions on emerging challenges and capabilities.

Students entering this program are expected to have a strong foundation in cyber security and networking. In addition, entering students will be expected to understand and use the languages and techniques of operating system and network component development: the C programming language, assembly, shell scripting, use of linkers, loaders, and debuggers.

The total number of NPS graduate credits obtained for the certificate is 13.5, where laboratory credits are counted as half. This certificate program can also be applied toward a master's degree program, e.g. Curriculum 368.

Convenes

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer

Required Courses

CS4558

or

CS4648

(3-2)

 

(3-2)

Network Traffic Analysis

 

Advanced Cyber Munitions

CS4678

(4-2)

Advanced Cyber Vulnerability Assessment

CS4679

(4-1)

Advances in Cyber Security Operations

Master of Computing Technology (MCT) - Curriculum 357 (Distance Learning)

Program Manager

Loren E. Peitso

Code CS/Lp, Glasgow East, Room 335

(831) 656-3009, DSN 756-3009, FAX (831) 656-3238

MCTDegProg@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Man-Tak Shing, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 334

(831) 656-2634, DSN 756-2634, FAX (831) 656-2814

shing@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The MCT degree offers its graduates the knowledge and skills necessary to specify, evaluate, and manage computer system development, as well as the ability to provide technical guidance in the analysis, design, and application of software and firmware used in the Navy. The MCT program consists of 12 courses selected to provide breadth and depth in the latest computing technologies. Four courses provide a foundation in computing for those without a Computer Science background. Four specialization fundamentals courses provide breadth in computing technologies and techniques examined with respect to a consistent specialization theme, and the final four specialization depth courses develop strong expertise in the specialization area. A capstone paper completes the degree.

The MCT degree provides a graduate education for those in unique circumstances. State-of-the-art distance learning (DL) technology is used to bring the MCT program straight to the student on duty. With fully Web-based courses, there is no required "class time"-no need to get off the flight schedule, miss any watches, or adjust a duty schedule. MCT offers a seamless transition from duty station to duty station; when you move the program goes with the student, even on the road. For organizations that desire to sponsor groups of students, we can arrange to deliver courses at an accelerated pace via video tele education (VTE), this option requires scheduled on-duty classroom time.

The MCT degree is fully accredited and taught by the same faculty that teaches NPS resident courses. All courses are web-based conversions of existing NPS courses. These fully-online versions are taught by faculty that teach the courses in residence and have also completed the Interactive Distance Learning faculty development course offered by the NPS Center for Educational Design, Development, and Distribution (CED3).

MCT is an excellent fit for those officers and government service (GS) personnel whose career track would not otherwise lend itself to receiving a resident technical graduate education. Available anywhere in the world, at home, on detachment, and at sea.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent, with above average grades in mathematics, (including differential and integral calculus) resulting in an academic profile code (APC) of at least 325 is required. Undergraduate degrees in applied science or engineering are highly desirable. Students lacking these prerequisites may be acceptable for the program, providing their undergraduate records and/or other indicators of success, such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), indicate an ability to work in quantitative subjects. While previous academic or practical experience in computer science is certainly helpful and can enhance the applicant's potential for admission, such experience is not a prerequisite. Active/Active Duty Reserve U.S. military and GS personnel are eligible.

Entry Date

The MCT is a 12-quarter (one course per quarter), fully-online curriculum with entry dates in January/July. If further information is needed, contact the Program Officer or the Academic Associate for this curriculum.

Degree

Master of Computing Technology

The Master of Computing Technology program is awarded after the satisfactory completion of a program which satisfies, as a minimum, the following degree requirements:

  1. At least 40 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, of which at least 12 quarter-hours must be at the 4000 level.
  2. Completion of an approved sequence of courses constituting specialization in an area of computing technology.
  3. Completion of a capstone paper.

Subspecialty

None currently assigned. DL students desiring a computer science subspecialty code (6203P) may be able to arrange a resident assignment at NPS with their sponsor/community detailer to add a research element to their degree program and complete the ESR requirements for a computer science subspecialty code. Six months of resident study will be required.

If a transition to a MS in Computer Science (MSCS) degree is also desired, the research element must be arranged before the MCT curriculum is finished. A MSCS (in lieu of the MCT degree) will be granted after completion of the research element and thesis. The MSCS cannot be granted if the MCT has been awarded for the same coursework.

Typical Course of Study

1st Year Computer Science Foundations

CS2020

(4-2)

Introduction to Programming

CS3030

(4-0)

Computing Architecture and Operating Systems

CS2121

(3-2)

Essential Automata and Algorithms

CS3502

(4-1)

Computer Communications & Networks

2nd Year Specialization Fundamentals

Four-course sequence, all courses at the 3000 or 4000 level, in one of the listed specializations:

3rd Year Specialization Depth

Four-course sequence, minimum12 credits at the 4000 level, continuing the specialization sequence:

Specialization Options

Information Security Systems Engineering (ISSE)

The role of Information Systems Security Engineering (ISSE) is to help ensure that the security requirements of systems are met. Lacking proper security engineering, systems fail to be certified and accredited, causing costly delays or failures. Ideally the Information Systems Security Engineer (also known as an ISSE) will be a member of the system development team throughout its lifecycle; however, for preexisting systems, the ISSE may be required to assess existing system vulnerabilities and determine mitigating strategies. As systems have grown more complex and adversaries continue to successfully exploit numerous vulnerabilities, the need for improved secure system engineering and the formation of a larger cadre of skilled ISSEs has become more acute. The ISSE course sequence will provide the knowledge and analytical skills required to contribute productively in system developments and assist in building a larger cadre of skilled ISSEs to combat adversaries.

Principles of Cyber Defense

The Principles of Cyber defense fundamentals sequence is comprised of the courses offered in the Cyber Security Fundamentals graduate certificate. It is intended to provide a technically rigorous foundation upon which to build knowledge and skills in computer network defense, attack and exploitation. Each course is comprised of both instruction and laboratory exercises involving cyber security aspects of computers and networks. These synergistic activities allow students to internalize key concepts in cyber security. The specialization depth sequence will give the student a detailed understanding of and ability to function in real operational situations involving cyber security sharing courses with the Cyber Security Defense Certificate. They will gain the technical depth required to actively prepare for and respond to attacks. Students will learn to analyze network traffic to extract the observable characteristics of networks and network devices, thus providing a basis for defensive strategies. They will learn to build tools and how to configure systems and networks to permit systems to foster resiliency and continuity of operations, perhaps with reduced capacity, through attacks. Students will learn how to construct systems and tools to mitigate the impact of malicious software. Students will learn forensic techniques to retrieve and analyze stored information that may be corrupted or hidden. Considerable programming and hands-on work with systems and networks will be required.

Networking

The Computer Networks specialization is designed to provide knowledge of computer architecture, networks, and system software for real-time and multicomputer systems and in the rapidly growing areas of wireless networking, mobile devices, and related topics, including mobile computing and wireless security.

Generalist

The generalist specialization concentrated on understanding a broad cross section of the computing field with respect to the technologies in defense communications and weapons systems the unrestricted line officer will work with in the near to medium term. Topic areas include computer and network security, autonomous and robotic systems, networked distributed systems including cloud technologies and emerging wireless mobile computing technologies.

Computer Science - Curriculum 368 (Resident), Curriculum 376 (Distance Learning)

Program Officer

LCDR Eric McMullen, USN

Code CS/Em, Glasgow East, Room 309

(831) 656-7980, DSN 756-7980

FAX (831) 656-3681

elmcmull@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Man-Tak Shing, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 334

(831) 656-2634, DSN 756-2634, FAX (831) 656-2814

shing@nps.edu

Program Manager for CS Degree Program via Distance Learning

Loren E. Peitso

Code CS/Lp, Glasgow East, Room 335

(831) 656-3009, DSN 756-3009

FAX (831) 656-3238

lepeitso@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Computer Science curriculum is designed to provide the officer with the technical knowledge and skills necessary to specify, evaluate, and manage computer system design; to provide technical guidance in applications ranging from data processing to tactical embedded systems; to educate the officer in the analysis and design methodologies appropriate for hardware, software, and firmware; and provide practical experience in applying modern computer equipment and research techniques to solve military problems.

The principles presented in the curriculum have two layers: computing mechanics deals with the workings of computations, communications, computers, and memories; and computing design deals with the ways of organizing software systems for simplicity, reliability, performance, security, and value.

Our curriculum also provides for concrete experience in computing practices—the skills and ways of thinking that mark a computing professional. These include programming, engineering of systems, modeling, and innovating. We offer a unique course called Technology, Innovation, and Leadership that teaches the practices and discipline of innovation.

The two dimensions—computing principles and practices—define the space in which the core technologies of computing exist and serve application domains: algorithms, architecture, artificial intelligence, database, networking, operating systems, security, and more.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent, with above average grades in mathematics, (including discrete math, and differential and integral calculus) resulting in an APC of at least 323 is required for direct entry. Undergraduate degrees in applied science or engineering are highly desirable. Students lacking these prerequisites may be acceptable for the program, through a "foundations" 12-week refresher quarter, provided that their undergraduate records and/or other indicators of success, such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), indicate an ability to work in quantitative subjects. While previous academic or practical experience in computer science is certainly helpful and can enhance the applicant's potential for admission, such experience is not a prerequisite.

Entry Date

Computer Science is a six-quarter course of study with entry dates in March and September. Prospective students requiring a 12-week “foundations” refresher will begin study one quarter prior to those entry dates. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Master of Science in Computer Science

The degree of Master of Science in Computer Science is awarded after the satisfactory completion of a program which satisfies, as a minimum, the following degree requirements:

  1. At least 40 quarter hours of graduate-level work, of which at least 12 quarter hours must be at the 4000 level.
  2. At least 28 of the 40 graduate-level credit hours listed above must be CS, MOVES, SW courses.
  3. To ensure a sufficient breadth across the field of Computer Science, the following course topics must be satisfied as part of the course of study or through validation prior to graduation: Artificial Intelligence (CS3310), Networks (CS3502), Automata (CS3101), and Introduction to Computer Security (CS3600).
  4. Completion of an approved sequence of courses constituting specialization in an area of computer science.
  5. Completion of an acceptable thesis or a capstone project.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Computer Science degree are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements established by the sponsor for the curricular program.

Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science

Specifics on the Ph.D. in Computer Science program are found in the linked CS Department Ph.D. Handbook.

Subspecialty

Completion of curriculum 368 qualifies a USN officer as a Computer Science Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 6203P.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Computer Science Instructor, U.S. Naval Academy

Preoperational Test and Evaluation, SPAWAR, Washington, D.C.

Computer Systems Analyst, COMNAVSECGRU, Washington, D.C.

ADP Systems Director, Naval Security Group, Pensacola, FL

Chief SEID, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

Operational Test and Evaluation, COMOPTEVFOR

ADP System Security, NSA/CSS, Ft. Meade, MD

Typical Course of Study (24-Month Track)

Refresher Quarter 0 (Optional)

CS2020

(4-2)

Introduction to Programming

MA2025

(4-1)

Logic & Discrete Math

CS2000

(6-6)

Intro to Computer Systems

Quarter 1

CS3021

(4-2)

Introduction to Data Structures and Intermediate Programming

CS3502

(4-2)

Computer Communications
and Networks

CS3070

(3-2)

Operating Systems

OS3307

(4-1)

Modeling Practices for Computing

Quarter 2

CS3310

(4-1)

Artificial Intelligence

CS3600

(4-2)

Introduction to Computer Security

CS3200

(4-2)

Large Scale Architecture

CS3150

(4-0)

Design and Analysis of Algorithms

CS4900

(2-0)

Technology and Transformation I

Quarter 3

CS3101

(4-2)

Theory of Formal Lang & Automata

CS3060

(3-1)

Database Systems

SW3460

(2-1)

Software Development

CS3004

(2-1)

Human-Computer Interface

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy & Policy

CS4901

(2-0)

Research Methods

Quarter 4

CS0810/
CS0809

(0-8)

Thesis/Capstone Research

-

-

Track Requirement

-

-

Track Requirement

-

-

Track Elective (Students on the 18-month track will take NW3285)

Quarter 5

CS0810/
CS0809

(0-8)

Thesis/Capstone Research

-

-

Track Requirement

-

-

Track Requirement

-

-

Track Elective (Students on the 18-month track will take NW3275)

Quarter 6

CS0810/
CS0809

(0-8)

Thesis/Capstone Research

-

-

Track Requirement

-

-

Track Requirement

-

-

Track Elective (Students on the 18-month track will take NW3276)

Quarter 7 (optional for 24-month students)

CS0810/
CS0809

(0-8)

Thesis/Capstone Research

-

-

Track Elective

-

-

Track Elective

MN3331

(5-1)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management

* Note: Track Core Requirement courses will be determined by the selection of one of the following specialization track options.

Specialization Track Options

Track Core Requirement courses will be determined by the selection of one of the following specialization track options.

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Computer Science - Curriculum 368
Subspecialty Code: 6203P

The Computer Science and System Design subspecialty code (6203) is intended to serve the Navy by providing commands with officers who possess expertise related to the specification, development, installation, maintenance, evaluation, and security of hardware and software computer systems and networks. The officer must have the theoretical knowledge and practical expertise to perform technical and oversight responsibilities related to computer systems as required by the Department of Defense. Particular skills and competencies that constitute this subspecialty are detailed below:

  1. Fundamental Computer Science: Architectures, operating systems, computer networks, high- and low-level languages and their translation, software systems, human-computer interaction.
  2. Software Development: Planning and development of large software projects to include specification of requirements, design, technical documentation, implementation, risk analysis, testing, quality assurance, maintenance, process metrics, and measures of effectiveness through the use of modern software engineering techniques and tools.
  3. Analysis: Application of scientific methods to determine reliability, efficiency and performance of computer systems; modeling, simulation, and analysis of algorithms, processes, and systems in support of Naval operations.
  4. Data Systems and Management: Devices, interfaces and interconnects; storage architectures and data organizations, addressing and indexing; continuity, backup and recovery; resilience; models, analytics, and visualization; large data sets, and data mining.
  5. Autonomous Systems: Design, construction, and operation of autonomous systems including unmanned vehicles; analysis tools for security, forensics and intelligence. Basic skills include artificial intelligence, knowledge management and representation, machine learning, heuristic search, and data mining.
  6. Cyber-Systems and Operations: Development, implementation and management of security provisions, information assurance and situational awareness for computer systems, networks and ICS, and their integration with Defensive Cyber Operations, Offensive Cyber Operations, and DoD Global Information Grid Operations.
  7. Networking and Distributed Computing: Modeling, design and implementation of network infrastructures for distributed and mobile systems. Application of distributed multi-core and multi-processor systems in High Performance Computing (HPC) and cloud computing configurations to support analysis, forensics, engineering, management, and other “big data” applications, such as operations, intelligence and meteorological/oceanographic.
  8. Specialization: In addition to the breadth obtained from the collection of previous items, the officer will complete a series of advanced courses that integrate computer science in DOD systems, software, and operations. This in-depth study conveys essential real-world complexities and details that are required to make informed decisions during every stage of computer systems’ lifecycles. Knowledge is deepened through a thesis or capstone project in a framework that exercises the practices of innovation, problem solving, systems-thinking, and real-world application.

Joint Professional Military Education (JPME)

Per community requirements, the officer will have an understanding of warfighting within the context of operational art to include: strategy and war, theater security decision making, and joint maritime operations. Confers JPME Phase I certification.

Software Engineering - Curriculum 369 (Resident and Distance Learning)

Program Officer

LCDR Eric McMullen, USN

Code CS/Em, Glasgow East, Room 309

(831) 656-7980, DSN 756-7980

FAX (831) 656-3681

elmcmull@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Man-Tak Shing, Ph.D.

Code CS, Glasgow East, Room 334

(831) 656-2634, DSN 756-2634, FAX (831) 656-2814

shing@nps.edu

Program Manager for Software Engineering Degree Program via Distance Learning

Loren E. Peitso

Code CS/Lp, Glasgow East, Room 335

(831) 656-3009, DSN 756-3009

FAX (831) 656-3238

lepeitso@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The software engineering curriculum is designed to address the seemingly never-ending "software crisis" within the defense community. It builds on the student's knowledge of both computer science and engineering sciences, in addition to leveraging the student's real-world, problem-solving experience working with software-intensive systems. The curriculum introduces the students to the theory, principles, and practices of software engineering. These engineering practices enable acquisition professionals to procure highly dependable, trustworthy software-intensive systems on schedule, within budget, and with the correct functionality. The program offers both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Software Engineering.

Requirements for Entry

The Software Engineering program is no longer accepting new entries into the degree programs. Students interested in Software Engineering are referred to the Computer Science (Curric 368) degree program’s Software Engineering and Architecture Track.

Entry Date

The Software Engineering program is no longer accepting new entries into the degree programs. Current students will be matriculated through graduation.

Degree

Master of Science in Software Engineering (MSSwE)

The degree of Master of Science in Software Engineering is awarded after the satisfactory completion of a program which satisfies, as a minimum, the following degree requirements:

  1. At least 40 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, per NPS requirements, and within that 40 hours at least 12 graduate-level Software Engineering courses.
  2. Completion of an acceptable thesis in addition to the required course work.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Software Engineering degree are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curricular program.

Doctor of Philosophy in Software Engineering

The Ph.D. program in Software Engineering is designed for DoD software practitioners who want to acquire the skill and knowledge to perform state-of-the-art research on issues related to the development and evolution of large, complex, software systems, and to intelligently manage the research of other software practitioners. It offers the software professionals a unique program of study and advances software engineering principles and technology vital to DoD researchers and program managers.

The Ph.D. degree is awarded after successful defense of a dissertation that advances the state of the art in Software Engineering. Ph.D. seminars are available to assist students in reaching that goal. See the online handbook for details on admission, requirements, and procedures:

Software Engineering Ph.D. Handbook

Typical Course of Study

(Ph.D. SwE Program)

Quarter 1

SW4931

(3-0)

Core Area of Software Engineering Doctoral Studies

SW5810

(0-8)

Dissertation Research

Quarter 2

SW4932

(3-0)

Advanced Area of Software Engineering Doctoral Studies

SW5810

(0-8)

Dissertation Research

Quarter 3

SW4933

(3-0)

Supporting Area of Software Engineering Doctoral Studies

SW5810

(0-8)

Dissertation Research

Quarter 4

SW4934

(3-0)

Application of Advanced Concepts in Software Engineering Doctoral Studies

SW5810

(0-8)

Dissertation Research

Quarter 5

SW4935

(3-0)

Software Engineering Dissertation Preparation

SW5810

(0-8)

Dissertation Research

Quarter 6

SW4936

(3-0)

Seminar on Solving Software Engineering Research Problems

SW5810

(0-8)

Dissertation Research

Quarter 7

SW4937

(4-0)

Software Engineering Dissertation Research

SW5810

(0-8)

Dissertation Research

Quarter 8

SW4938

(4-0)

Communicating Research Results in Software Engineering

SW5810

(0-8)

Dissertation Research

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Students who graduate from the M.S./Ph.D. Software Engineering programs typically hold senior technical and acquisition positions, such as chief system engineer, technical director, and program/project manager.

Typical Course of Study

(Full-Time MSSwE Program)

Quarter 1

SW3460

(3-1)

Software Methodology

SW4581

(3-1)

Software Reliability

MN3301

(4-0)

Acquisition of Defense Systems

IS4300

(3-2)

Project Management for Enterprise Systems

Quarter 2

SW4500

(3-1)

Introduction to Formal Methods

SW4530

(4-0)

Software Engineering Research and Development

SW4591

(3-0)

Requirements Engineering

CS3600

(4-2)

Introduction to Computer Security

Quarter 3

SW4520

(3-0)

Advanced Software Engineering

SW4583

(3-1)

Principles of Software Design

SW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

SW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 4

SW4540

(3-1)

Software Testing

SW4590

(3-1)

Software Architecture

SW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

SW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Software Engineering - Curriculum 369

None currently assigned.

Master of Arts in Identity Management and Cyber Security (MAIDMCS) -- Curriculum 377 (Hybrid)/Curriculum 378 (Resident)

Identity Management and Cyber Security - Curriculum 377 (Hybrid - 18 months)

Identity Management and Cyber Security - Curriculum 378 (Resident - 12 months)

Program Manager

Cynthia Irvine, Ph.D.

Code CS/Ic, Glasgow East, Room 211

(831) 656-2461, DSN 756-2461

FAX (831) 656-3339

irvine@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Paul Clark

Code CS/Pc, Glasgow East, Room 215

(831) 656-2395, DSN 756-2395

FAX (831) 656-3339

pcclark@nps.edu

Direct inquiries to: MAIDMCSDegProg@nps.edu

Overview

The Master of Arts in Identity Management and Cyber Security (MAIDMCS) degree provides individuals whose organizations depend upon cyberspace a broad overview of cyber security technology and how to create a balance between risks and benefits based upon the physical and virtual assets requiring protection. The program focuses on cyber security as enabling technology for a broad range of enterprise initiatives and is intended for leaders in a wide range of government activities regardless of organizational specialization. The MAIDMCS program consists of 12 courses selected to provide breadth and depth in the latest security technologies.

Designed to accommodate busy individuals, the Master of Arts degree program is offered in a hybrid mode that requires participants to be in residence (at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California or possibly another location to be determined) two weeks each quarter (for a total of 12 weeks). Participants complete the balance of their coursework via network-based distance learning methods. The program can also be taken entirely at NPS and is of shorter duration in this mode. Participants complete an applications project for which a written report is required.

The degree provides participants with the knowledge and skills to:

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent, resulting in an academic profile code (APC) of at least 344 is required. While previous academic or practical experience in computer science or a related field is not a prerequisite. Active/Active Duty Reserve U.S. military, DoD civilian, and US Government civilian personnel are eligible.

Entry Date

The MAIDMCS degree is designed to be either a 6-quarter (two courses per quarter) hybrid mode or a 4-quarter fully resident model. For further information, contact the Program Manager or Academic Associate for this curriculum.

Degree

Master of Arts in Identity Management and Cyber Security

The Master of Arts in Identity Management and Cyber Security degree is awarded after the satisfactory completion of a program that satisfies, as a minimum, the following degree requirements:

  1. At least 40 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, per NPS requirements.
  2. Completion of the specific sequence of courses satisfying the breadth and subject matter requirements of Identity Management and Cyber Security.
  3. Completion of an applications project.

Subspecialty

None currently assigned.

Typical Course of Study

(The typical 6 quarter (18-month) hybrid course of study is shown below.)

Quarter 1

CS3699

(3-0)

Biometrics

IS3710

(3-0)

Identity Management Operations

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

Quarter 2

CS3686

(3-0)

Identity Management Infrastructure

IS3720

(3-0)

Identity Management Policy

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

Quarter 3

CS3600

(4-2)

Introduction to Computer Security

CS3505

(3-2)

Introductory Computer Communications

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

Quarter 4

CS3670

(3-2)

Information Assurance: Secure Management of Systems

CS3610/or DA3105

(4-0)

or

(4-1)

Information Ethics, Crime and Law or

Conflict in Cyberspace

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

Quarter 5

CS3636

(3-0)

Data Fusion with Online Information

CS3633

(4-0)

Data Security

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

Quarter 6

CS3640

(3-1)

Analysis of DoD Critical Infrastructure Protection

CS3645

(3-0)

Cyber Threats and Mitigation

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

Typical Course of Study

(Accelerated 12-month Format Hypothetical Schedule.)

Quarter 1

CS3699

(3-0)

Biometrics

IS3710

(3-0)

Identity Management Operations

CS3505

(3-2)

Introductory Computer Communications

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

-

-

Elective

Quarter 2

CS3686

(3-0)

Identity Management Infrastructure

IS3720

(3-0)

Identity Management Policy

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

CS3600

(4-2)

Information Assurance: Intro to Computer Security

-

-

Elective

Quarter 3

CS3670

(3-2)

Information Assurance: Secure Management of Systems

CS3610/or DA3105

(4-0)

or

(4-1)

Information Ethics, Crime and Law or

Conflict in Cyberspace

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

CS3633

(4-0)

Data Security

-

-

Elective

Quarter 4

CS3640

(3-1)

Analysis of DoD Critical Infrastructure Protection

CS3636

(3-0)

Data Fusion with Online Information

CS3645

(3-0)

Cyber Threats and Mitigation

CS3621

(0-4)

Applications Project and Research for Identity Management and Cyber Security Studies

Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (MOVES) - Curriculum 399

Program Officer

LCDR Eric McMullen, USN

Code CS/Em, Glasgow East, Room 309

(831) 656-7980, DSN 756-7980

FAX (831) 656-3681

elmcmull@nps.edu

Chair, MOVES Academic Committee and Academic Associate

Chris Darken, Ph.D.

Code CS/Cd, Watkins Hall, Room 382

(831) 656-2095, DSN 756-2095

FAX (831) 656-7599

cjdarken@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation (MOVES) Academic Program of the Naval Postgraduate School provides the MS and Ph.D. student both fundamental and specialized courses in applied visual simulation technology, combat models and systems, and the application of quantitative analyses to training and simulation technology.

The MS program is a seven-quarter program (eight quarters for students requiring JPME) whose core covers the fundamentals of modeling and simulation, data analysis, visual simulation, intelligent systems, training, and human performance. These topics include object-oriented programming, probability, statistics, stochastic modeling, data analysis, acquisition and program management, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, simulation and training, and combat modeling systems. The MS student demonstrates depth by the completion of a written thesis.

The MOVES Academic Program also has a program leading to the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of special strength amongst the MOVES Academic Faculty are combat modeling and analysis, networked and web-based visual simulation, agents and cognitive modeling, training systems and human factors, and discrete-event simulation.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent, with above average grades in mathematics (including differential and integral calculus), resulting in an APC of at least 325 is required for entry. Undergraduate degrees in applied science or engineering are highly desirable. Students lacking these prerequisites may be acceptable for the program, through the 12-week technical refresher or 12-week Engineering Science program, providing their undergraduate records and/or other indicators of success, such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), indicate an ability to work in quantitative subjects. While previous academic or practical experience in modeling, virtual environments, and simulation is certainly helpful and can enhance the applicant's potential for admission, such experience is not a prerequisite.

Entry Date

MOVES is an seven-quarter (eight quarters for students requiring JPME) course of study starting annually in September. Those requiring the 12-week refresher will begin study in July. If further information is needed, contact the MOVES Academic Associate or the MOVES Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Master of Science in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

The degree of Master of Science in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation is awarded after satisfactory completion of a program which satisfies, as a minimum, the following degree requirements:

  1. At least 40 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, of which at least 12 quarter-hours must be at the 4000 level.
  2. Completion of an approved sequence of courses constituting specialization in an area of Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation.
  3. Completion of an acceptable thesis in addition to the required course work.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements established by the sponsor for the curricular program.

Completion of the seven-quarter sequence of courses specified below is required to satisfy the Educational Skill Requirements for the Navy 6202P code and Marine MOS 8825.

Doctorate in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

The Ph.D. degree requires the equivalent of at least three academic years of study beyond the baccalaureate level (some of which may be for another post-baccalaureate degree), with at least one academic year (or its equivalent) being spent in residence at NPS. The student must complete, in order, the following steps, which are detailed at www.movesinstitute.org.

  1. Form a dissertation committee
  2. Pass a written qualifying examination
  3. Declare a secondary specialization
  4. Pass an oral qualifying examination
  5. Pass a final examination
  6. Complete a dissertation

No courses are required for the Ph.D. degree besides the secondary specialization unless the student's doctoral committee so stipulates.

Ph.D. Minor in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

A Ph.D. minor in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation consists of:

  1. Three courses at the 4000 level that form a coherent sequence relating to Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation.
  2. The courses must be from at least two departments or academic groups.
  3. The head of the MOVES Ph.D. program will write a letter attesting that the student has fulfilled the requirements upon request of the student.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as a modeling, virtual environments, and simulation subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 6202P.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

TBD

Course of Study

(MOVES (399) Matrix, All Students)

Refresher – if required (Summer)

CSR100

(2-2)

Refresher for
Beginning Programming

MA2025

(4-1)

Logic and Discrete Mathematics

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus I

MA1114

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus II with Matrix Algebra

Quarter 1 (Fall)

CS2072

(4-2)

Fundamental Object-Oriented Programming in JavaScript

OS3111

(4-1)

Probability and Statistics

MA3042

(4-0)

Linear Algebra

MV3101

(4-0)

Introduction to Department of Defense Modeling and Simulation

MV2921

(2-0)

Introduction to MOVES

Quarter 2 (Winter)

CS2173

(4-2)

Java as a Second Language

OS3113

(4-1)

Data Analysis for HSI and MOVES

MV3202

(3-2)

Computer Graphics Programming

MV4002

(4-1)

Simulation and Training

MV3922

(2-0)

Introduction to Virtual Environmental Technology

Quarter 3 (Spring)

MV3302

(4-1)

Introduction to Discrete Event Modeling

OS3112

(4-2)

Statistics and Design of Experiments

MV3203

(3-2)

Graphical Simulation

CS3310

(4-1)

Artificial Intelligence

MV3923

(2-0)

Introduction to Research
in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Quarter 4 (Summer)

MV4025

(3-2)

Cognitive and Behavioral Modeling for Simulations

OS3311

(4-0)

Probability Models for Military Applications

MV4501

(2-4)

Simulation Application Practicum

MV4657

(3-2)

Modeling and Simulation for Stability, Security, Transition and Reconstruction (STTR)

MV4924

(1-1)

Current Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Course of Study

(MOVES (399) 2nd Year Matrix, All Students)

Quarter 5 (Fall)

MV3500

(3-2)

Internetwork Communications and Simulation

MV4502

(2-4)

Simulation Development Practicum

MV4001

(4-1)

Human factors of Virtual Environments

MV4924

(1-1)

Current Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Quarter 6 (Winter)

MV4503

(2-4)

Simulation Interoperability Practicum

MN3331

(5-1)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management*

SE3100

(3-2)

Fundamentals of System Engineering**

MV0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MV4924

(1-1)

Current Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

*DOD students only. Non-DOD students take GB3031 instead.

**Students requiring JPME take NW-3275 instead and complete optional 8th quarter below.

Quarter 7 (Spring)

MV0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MV0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OA/MV4655

(4-0)

Introduction to Joint Combat Modeling

MV4460

(4-0)

Management of Modeling and Simulation

MV4924

(1-1)

Current Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Quarter 8 (Summer)

SE3100

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Engineering

NW3230

(0-8)

Thesis Research

NW3276

(4-0)

Management of Modeling and Simulation Development

NW3285

(1-1)

Current Topics in Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation (MOVES) - Curriculum 399
Subspecialty Code: 6202P

6202 Subspecialists are the Department of Defense's (DoD) experts in Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation. Modeling and Simulation (M&S) is a discipline that uses models – including emulators, prototypes, simulators, and stimulators – either statically or over time, to develop the data needed for making managerial or technical decisions. Such data and phenomena are often visualized in virtual and augmented environments, facilitating efficient data manipulation and the users' perceptual immersion, all essential for effective analysis, training and operation.

All 6202 Subspecialists can design, build, manage and apply Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation best practices and tools in support of training, analysis, acquisition, testing and operational capabilities. The Subspecialists have highly developed analytical and critical thinking skills, and the ability to innovate and solve domain problems. They have also completed a program of original research, culminating in a Master's Thesis. 6202 Subspecialists are proficient in the general principles of M&S and have acquired in-depth knowledge about select areas of concentration.

6202 Subspecialists can, for example:

All subspecialists earning an advanced degree in compliance with the 6202 subspecialty code obtain skills and competencies in the following areas:

  1. History and Fundamentals of M&S: The officer will have competence in the history and fundamental concepts of Modeling and Simulation (M&S), with a focus on DoD M&S.
  2. Applied Mathematics: The officer will have a practical understanding of linear algebra, discrete mathematics, statistics, data analysis, stochastic modeling and experimental design, as well as their effective application in the domain of M&S.
  3. Computer Systems: The officer will have a sound understanding of computer programming, software development, networks, and distributed simulations.
  4. Virtual Environments: The officer will be knowledgeable in computer graphics, virtual and augmented reality, visualization, and simulation systems.
  5. Training and Human Systems: The officer will have a sound understanding of human systems engineering, training systems, human behavior modeling and human performance evaluation.
  6. M&S Systems Life-Cycle Management: The officer will be knowledgeable in systems engineering management, requirements analysis, program management and policy, and acquisition.
  7. Modeling: The officer will be knowledgeable in system modeling, combat modeling and modeling physical phenomena, including verification, validation and accreditation (VV&A).
  8. Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) per community requirements: The officer will develop an understanding of warfighting within the context of operational art, to include: national military capabilities and command structure, joint and service doctrine, joint planning and execution, and joint and multinational forces and systems integration at the operational level of war. This requirement is fulfilled by completing the Naval War College four-course series leading to Service Intermediate-level Professional Military Education and Phase I JPME credit.

Specialization: Each 6202 Subspecialist will select a number of areas of specialization that integrate Modeling, Simulation, and Virtual Environments in DoD systems, practices and operations. These specializations require further emphasis in particular areas of study, both through completing the appropriate sequences of courses and conducting original research for a Master's thesis.

Area specializations might include:

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Director, Navy Modeling and Simulation Office (NMSO).

Information Assurance Certificates

Program Manager

Cynthia Irvine, Ph.D.

Code CS/Ci, Glasgow East, Room 211

(831) 656-2461, DSN 756-2461

irvine@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The NPS Computer Science Department is authorized to award five Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) Information Assurance Certificates. The certificates are awarded to students who successfully complete specified sets of Computer Science and Information Assurance courses.

The certificates are based on training and education standards that were established by the National Security Telecommunications and Information Systems Security Committee (NSTISSC).

The standards address duties and responsibilities of Information System Security Professionals, Senior System Managers, System Administrators, Information Systems Security Officers, and System Certifiers.

Certificate Sponsor

Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS), www.cnss.gov

Certificates Awarded

Required Courses

NSTISSI 4011 - Information Systems Security Professionals

CNSS 4012 - Senior System Managers

CNSS 4013 - System Administrators

CNSS 4014 - Information System Security Officers

NSTISSI 4015 - System Certifiers

Information Systems Security Engineering (ISSE) Certificate – Curriculum 270

Program Manager

Cynthia Irvine, Ph.D.

Code CS/Ci, Glasgow East, Room 211

(831) 656-2461, DSN 756-2461

irvine@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The role of Information Systems Security Engineering (ISSE) is to help ensure that the security requirements of systems are met. Lacking proper security engineering, systems fail to be certified and accredited, causing costly delays or failures. Ideally the Information Systems Security Engineer (also known as an ISSE) will be a member of the system development team throughout its lifecycle; however, for preexisting systems, the ISSE may be required to assess existing system vulnerabilities and determine mitigating strategies.

As systems have grown more complex and adversaries continue to successfully exploit numerous vulnerabilities, the need for improved secure system engineering and the formation of a larger cadre of skilled ISSEs has become more acute. The ISSE course sequence will provide the knowledge and analytical skills required to contribute productively in system developments and assist in building a larger cadre of skilled ISSEs to combat adversaries.

Certificate Sponsor

National Security Agency (NSA)

Required Courses

Identity Management Certificate -- Curriculum 278

Program Manager

Cynthia Irvine, Ph.D.

Code CS/Ci, Glasgow East, Room 211

(831) 656-2461, DSN 756-2461

irvine@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Identity Management (IDM) is a growing concern throughout defense, government, and private sector organizations. It includes an infrastructure that supports the identification of humans in physical space, and the logical identification of human and non-human subjects, hardware, and software in cyber space.

The IDM Certificate is offered each academic quarter and is conducted in a hybrid mode that involves a one-week program of intense IDM education at NPS followed by 9 weeks of remote learning, and culminates with an on-site (NPS campus) course work at the end of the academic quarter. The hybrid approach reduces student attrition and has resulted in considerable esprit de corps and camaraderie among the students who represent a mixture of military and government civilians. The IDM Certificate takes 2 quarters, or 6 months, to complete.

Upon completion of the courses with adequate grades, students may apply IDM course credits toward Identity Management specialization tracks in either the Computer Science or Information Sciences degree programs. For more information, please visit the IDM website at: imep.nps.edu.

Certificate Sponsor

Biometrics Task Force

Required Courses

Department of Defense Analysis

Chairman

John Arquilla, Ph.D.

Code DA, Root Hall, Room 214

(831) 656-3691, DSN 756-3691

FAX (831) 656-2649

jarquilla@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Instruction

Sean Everton, Ph.D.

Code DA, Root Hall, Room R-205C

(831) 656-2709, DSN 756-2709

sfeverto@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Operations

Brian Greenshields

Code DA, Root Hall, Room 209

831-656-3998

bhgreens@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Research

David Tucker, Ph.D.

Code DA, Root Hall, Room 215

(831) 656-3754, DSN 756-3754

dctucker@nps.edu

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Laura Adame, National Intelligence Chair (2013); M.A., Georgetown University, 1986; M.S., National War College, 2006.

John Arquilla, Chairman, Defense Analysis Department and Professor (1993); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1991.

Mark T. Berger, Visiting Professor (2006); Ph.D., University of New South Wales, 1992.

Leo Blanken, Assistant Professor (2008); Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 2006.

Douglas Borer, Associate Professor (2004); Ph.D., Boston University, 1993.

Randy Burkett, National Intelligence Chair; Central Intelligence Agency Representative (2010); M.A., Naval Postgraduate School, 1989.

Dorothy Denning, Distinguished Professor (2002); Ph.D., Purdue University, 1975.

Jennifer J. Duncan, Program and Research Manager (1992); M.S., City University of New York, 1985.

Sean Everton, Assistant Professor (2007); Ph.D., Stanford University, 2007.

William P. Fox, Professor (2006); Ph.D., Clemson University, 1990.

Michael Freeman, Associate Professor (2005); Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2001.

Frank Giordano, Professor (2002); Ph.D., University of Arkansas, 1975.

Brian Greenshields, Senior Lecturer (2009); M.A., Naval Postgraduate School, 1989.

Heather S. Gregg, Assistant Professor (2006); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003.

Erik Jansen, Senior Lecturer (1994); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1987.

Michael Jaye, Associate Professor (2009); Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic, 1998.

Doowan Lee, Visiting Lecturer (2008); ABD, University of Chicago.

Guy Lemire, COL, USA, Chair of Special Operations (2005); M.S., School of Advanced Military Studies, 2002.

George Lober, Senior Lecturer (1998); M.A., California State University at Fresno, 1986.

Gordon H. McCormick, Professor (1992); Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1986.

Siamak Naficy, Visiting Professor (2011); Ph.D., UCLA, 2010; affiliated faculty.

Guillermo Owen, Professor (1983); Ph.D., Princeton University, 1962.

Robert O'Connell, Visiting Professor (2004); Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1976.

Nancy C. Roberts, Professor (1986); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1983.

Glenn Robinson, Associate Professor (1991); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1992.

Hy Rothstein, Senior Lecturer (2002); Ph.D., Tufts University, 2003.

Kalev (Gunner) Sepp, Senior Lecturer (2003); Ph.D., Harvard University, 1992.

Anna Simons, Professor (1998); Ph.D., Harvard University, 1992.

Bradley J. Strawser, Assistant Professor (2012); Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 2012.

Kristen Tsolis, Lecturer (1999); M.S., Monterey Institute of International Studies, 1999.

David Tucker, Associate Professor (1998); Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School, 1981.

Camber Warren, Assistant Professor (2012); Ph.D., Duke University, 2008.

Brief Overview

The Department of Defense Analysis is an interdisciplinary association of faculty, representing a wide range of academic and operational specialties. The Department has two curricula: the Special Operations/Irregular Warfare curriculum and the Joint Information Operations curriculum.

The Special Operations/Irregular Warfare curriculum provides a focused course of instruction in irregular warfare, sub-state conflict, terrorism and counterterrorism, and other "high leverage" operations in U.S. defense and foreign policy. The core program also provides every student with a strong background in strategic analysis, decision modeling, organization theory, and formal analytical methods. The student's program is built around a common set of core courses and a selected specialty track. Currently the tracks offered are: Irregular Warfare, Information Operations, Terrorist Operations and Financing, Strategic Forecasting and Decision making, Operations Analysis, Combat Systems, Financial Management, C4I Systems, National Security Affairs (Stability / Reconstruction), and National Security Affairs (Regional Studies). The individual student, depending on his or her interests and academic background, chooses the specialty track. In selected cases, students are also able to develop a tailored area of specialization to satisfy a particular interest or requirement. Graduates are awarded a Master of Science in Defense Analysis, with their specialty track so specified.

While the Special Operations/Irregular Warfare curriculum is sponsored by U.S. Special Operations Command, the curriculum actively solicits student participation from across the services, regardless of branch or specialty code. International students are an important element of the program. Students are encouraged to apply for the Winter or Summer Quarter, permitting them to take maximum advantage of the program's sequenced course of instruction. Exceptions are approved by the Academic Associate. The program is 18 months long and requires a completed thesis.

The goal of the Joint Information Operations curriculum is to educate military personnel and civilian officials of the United States and its Allies in the strategic and operational dimensions of information relative to the use of force as an instrument of statecraft.

The curriculum is designed for both the specialist who will be assigned to an information operations position and the generalist who will be assigned to an operations directorate. The curriculum includes a core of military art and operations, the human dimension of warfare emphasizing psychological warfare and military deception, analytical methods, and a technical sequence customized for each student that may include concentrations in cyber systems and operations, electronic warfare, intelligence support to JIO and computer network operations. Additional areas of concentration are available to meet specific student and organizational requirements. Finally, each student will write a thesis relevant to the field of information operations. The JIO curriculum is designed to develop the following competencies in its graduates:

This program is open to all branches of the military, federal employees, international military officers and government sponsored civilians.

Army, Air Force, Navy, and USMC graduates who also complete the approved 4-course Naval War College JPME curriculum also receive credit for JPME 1 and their Service-particular Intermediate Level Education (ILE/IDE).

Degree

Master of Science in Defense Analysis

Master of Science in Information Operations

Defense Analysis Course Descriptions

DA Courses

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<DA Courses DA0810-DA3105>

DA0810 Thesis Research (0-8) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This is a thesis research block. Prerequisite: None.

DA2010 Technical Writing and English Composition (4-0) Winter

This course provides a review of the rhetorical and grammatical principles necessary for successful academic writing. Course content emphasizes standard English grammar and syntax, as well as mastery of two rhetorical modes: comparison and contrast; and persuasion. Emphasis is also placed on the correct use of both parenthetical and traditional footnote notation and documentation for traditional and electronic sources. Prerequisite: None.

DA2410 Modeling for Military Decision Making, I (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course introduces mathematical modeling processes and concepts. Deterministic models in a graphical setting will be emphasized, including experimental modeling, curve fitting, and optimization. Applications include arms race models, Lanchester combat models, exponential growth and decay models, the Logistic model for social diffusion, supply/demand economic models, and inventory models. The computer is used as a tool with emphasis on the Excel spreadsheet package. Prerequisite: College algebra.

DA3010 Technical Writing and English Composition II (4-0) Fall

This course provides an in-depth analysis of the rhetorical principles applied in effective academic writing. Course content emphasizes rhetorical analysis, research, formal academic documentation, and a further review of English grammar and syntax. This course is writing intensive and intended to further the principles introduced in DA2010. Prerequisite: DA2010.

DA3101 Conflict in the Information Age (4-0) Fall/Winter

Given that the emerging Information Age heralds stark changes in future military and security policy, this course begins with a survey of the literature on the current revolution in military affairs (RMA), as well as studies of similar periods earlier in history. While significant attention is focused on information technologies, the principle emphasis in this course lies in an endeavor to understand the ways in which new technologies affect military strategy, doctrine, and organization. In particular, the rise of networked organizations, nonlinear military operations, and the further blurring of the line between war and peace are examined. Prerequisite: None.

DA3102 Psychological Warfare and Deception (4-0) Summer/Fall

This course surveys current theories of behavior, cognition, and perceptual bias, linking them to applied military issues across the spectrum of conflict, from irregular to high-intensity warfare. The effects of increased information flows on the prospects for accurate assessments in crisis and war are also considered in detail. Case studies and experimentation complement the theoretical framework initially advanced, with students working in teams during this portion of the course. Prerequisite: None.

DA3104 Computer Network Attack and Defense (4-1) Winter

This course introduces the basic principles of attacking and defending computer networks. On the attack side, it covers system intrusions, denial of service attacks, viruses, worms, and Trojan horses. On the defense side, it covers security policies and objectives, access control, authentication, firewalls, intrusion detection, cryptography, security management, and incident response. Basic networking concepts, including TCP/IP, are also covered. No background in computer science or networking is required. The course includes some hands-on work with hacking and security technologies. Prerequisite: DA3101.

DA3105 Conflict and Cyberspace (4-1) Summer

This course examines how cyberspace, particularly the Internet, can serve as a tool, target, and source of conflict for both state and nonstate actors. Topics include: characteristics of cyberspace, technology trends, power in cyberspace, cyber-based information operations (IO), cyber surveillance, domestic and international laws governing cyber operations, cyber crime, cyber activism and hacktivism, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, and cyber defense. Prerequisite: None.

<DA Courses DA3120-DA3900>

DA3120 Jihadi Information Operations (4-0) Spring

This course traces the rise and evolution of the Jihadi movement since its birth in the 1960s; analyzes the symbols, discourses, and media that Jihadis use in their own information operations, primarily vis-à-vis the larger Muslim community; and examines the impacts on and receptiveness of the broader Muslim community to these information operations. The focus of the course is on the transnational Jihadi movement, but some examples of local Jihadism will be discussed as well. Prerequisite: None.

DA3180 Warfare in the Electromagnetic Spectrum: Principles and Applications (4-0) Fall

This course provides students an introduction to the electromagnetic spectrum (EMS) and how we operate and conduct warfare within it. The class will include information up to and including SECRET-US ONLY; Clearance is required. No other courses are required as a prerequisite.

DA3201 Strategic Decision Making for Special Operations (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course examines the unique relationships and associated risks between strategic, operational, and tactical decision makers during the conduct of unconventional warfare (with emphasis on military special operations). The course begins by surveying popular models and theories of U.S. Government decision making and bureaucracy, while using selected case studies to improve the student's diagnostic skills. Roles and relationships between key strategic and political stakeholders in this decision-making process are examined to better understand the practical environment. Lastly, students will develop alternative methods of high risk/high payoff decision making based on the course subject matter. Prerequisites: None.

DA3210 The Unconventional Threat to HLS (4-0) Spring

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the operational and organizational dynamics of terrorism. It considers those who act as individuals, in small groups, or in large organizations; it considers indigenous actors, as well as those who come to the United States to raise money, recruit, or commit their acts of violence. In every instance, its focus is on violent clandestine activity that, whatever its motivation, has a political purpose or effect. The course addresses such specific topics as suicide terrorism, the role of the media, innovation and technology acquisition, the decline of terrorism, and ways of measuring the effect of counterterrorism policies and strategies. The course also looks briefly at sabotage. By the end of the course, students should be able to design effective measures for countering and responding to terrorism based on an understanding of its organizational and operational dynamics. Prerequisite: None.

DA3250 Anatomy of Intelligence (4-0) Spring

This course will be devoted to providing students with an improved understanding of the structure, capabilities, and shortcomings of U.S. intelligence, with particular emphasis being placed on Special Operations (SO) and Information Operations (IO). In general, the course approach will be from the general to the specific—beginning with an orientation aimed at familiarizing students with the basic nature of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), followed by a closer look at the issues surrounding the provision of intelligence to SO and IO. Prerequisite: None.

DA3260 Human Intelligence in Irregular Warfare (4-0) Fall

The course examines human intelligence operations in irregular warfare. It covers espionage, various source operations, counterintelligence, and covert action. It also briefly discusses the intelligence community and issues of coordinating the various human intelligence activities of the U.S. government. A central purpose of the course is to understand what changes may be necessary to human intelligence operations in order to increase their effectiveness in irregular warfare. Prerequisite: None.

DA3270 Intelligence in the Information Age (4-0) Spring

The course examines intelligence in light of the information revolution. It examines collection, analysis, covert action and counterintelligence. It also discusses the intelligence community and issues of coordinating the various intelligence activities of the U.S. government. A central purpose of the course is to increase understanding of the relationship between intelligence and information operations. Prerequisite: DA3101.

DA3410 Modeling for Special Operations II (4-0) Summer/Fall

This course continues the mathematical modeling process and concepts introduced in DA2410. Models will now entail the use of probability to find solutions. Introductory probabilistic models will be discussed, along with rudimentary statistical concepts needed to analyze data generated from those models. The course will also introduce simulation modeling. Decision modeling includes decision making under both risk and uncertainty. Use of Excel and the Minitab statistical package continues from DA2410. Prerequisite: DA2410.

DA3600 Geographical and Temporal Dimensions of Dark Networks (4-0) Winter/Summer

Using a task-based approach, the first course introduces a terror network that students analyze using Google Earth, ArcGIS, and software tools that elicit temporal and geospatial aspects of terror network activity. This class will teach students to think critically and creatively about how different forms of spatial data can be integrated into their research. While the class will briefly cover fundamentals of remote sensing and coordinate systems, this lab-intensive course primarily focuses on real world situations that students will face in the field. No prerequisite.

DA3610 Visual Analytics (4-0) Fall

Visual Analytics is the first course in the CORE Lab sequence. It addresses a common problem we all face-the collection of data at a faster rate than our ability to analyze it. The course's purpose is to introduce methods to examine and analyze massive, multidimensional, multi-source, time-varying data. It offers new tools and technology to integrate and fuse data to support the analytical process so we are better prepared to make decisions in a time-critical manner. Ultimately, the course opens the door to what

some consider a new multidisciplinary field:

• Visual representations and interaction techniques that enable us to see, explore, and understand large amounts of information at once

• Data representations and transformations that convert all massive, multidimensional, multi-source, and time varying information in ways that support visualization and analysis

• Analytical reasoning techniques that enable us to obtain deep insights that directly support assessment, planning, and decision making

• Techniques that support the production, presentation, and dissemination of analytical results and the communication of information to a variety of audiences (Thomas and Cook,2005:4).

Prerequisite: None.

DA3701 Choice, Chance, and Consequence (4-0) Fall

This course examines the dynamic relationship that exists between Choice, Chance, and Consequence. Specifically, this course examines many of the influential factors associated with effective decision making in stochastic environments, and explores the reasons why choices made in such environments often produce a host of unintended consequences. Incorporating Molton's Theory of The Unanticipated Consequences of Purposive Action, Machiavelli's The Prince, and Kahneman and Tversky's Prospect Theory, the course draws on case studies and examples from ancient Western literature, philosophy, American history, modern literature, and biography. Prerequisite: None.

DA3720 The Rise of Religious Violence (4-0) Fall/Winter

This course aims to explore the conditions under which religious groups engage in violent activity as a means of achieving various political, social and religious goals. In particular, this course will a) offer an introductory foundation in the world's major religious traditions; b) investigate how religion influences conflict, violence and war; c) compare the rise and fall of religious groups engaging in violent activity with the intent of better understanding the conditions under which religious groups resort to and abandon violence; d) compare other examples of religious violence with the current rise of Islamic militancy; e) consider ways in which religiously motivated violence can be mitigated; f) investigate how the United States and the U.S. military can address religiously motivated violence directed at its government, military, citizens and other interests. Prerequisite: Student must have completed at least one full quarter.

DA3721 Religion, Politics and Collective Action (4-0) As Required

The relationship between religion and political behavior is not as straightforward as many people assume, and there is considerable debate as to what the relationship between religion, politics and civil society should be. Some think that particular religious traditions should play no part; others believe that they should. In this class, we will briefly consider these arguments, but we will spend the majority of our time exploring the interplay between religion and collective action, introducing students to the major theories, topics and debates in the field of social movements and collective action. It seeks to discover the conditions under which social movements emerge, thrive, and decline, and why some people get involved in social movements and others do not. It also explores why religious traditions are often at the center of collective action. Prerequisite: Must have completed two quarters of coursework.

DA3750 Anthropology of Conflict (4-0) Fall/Spring

The focus of this course is cross-cultural conflict and violent confrontation with a view to considering how anthropology might be better used to study modern warfare and large-scale ethnic conflict. For instance, military historians, political scientists, and foreign policy analysts increasingly refer to “culture” and religion, identity politics, and ideology to help explain the new world disorder. From an anthropological perspective, are they using these social science concepts correctly? This course is designed to not only expose students to anthropological concepts useful for understanding the motivations of combatants from other cultures and the nature of warfare as fought by different people(s), but the extent to which cross-cultural miscommunication can complicate the role of U.S. military personnel abroad. Prerequisite: None.

DA3760 The Soul of the Sword: the History of Weapons (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course examines the evolution of weapons primarily from a cultural and anthropological perspective: the aim being to provide military professionals with a more basic insight into how and why arms are and were chosen; how the use of weaponry and the concept of courage have manifested themselves over time, and the manner in which the institution of war has been influenced by the nature of the armaments extant at the time conflict took place. The course will place special emphasis on not only the roots of weaponry very early in human existence, but also the characteristics and use of "weapons" (i.e., teeth, claws, antlers, etc.) by other species. This course will cover a vast sweep of history; expect to cover rocks and rockets, along with everything in between. Prerequisite: None.

DA3800 Theory and Practice of Social Revolution (4-0) As Required

This course provides an overview of insurgency and counterinsurgency. It reviews the theoretical literature and offers an operational focus on social revolution by examining the alternative models of insurgency provided by the doctrine of “people's war,” “foco theory,” and the urban guerrilla. The course goes on to examine the development of U.S. counterinsurgency doctrine, the difference between the “hearts and minds” and “systems” prescriptions of counterinsurgency, and alternative British, French, and Russian concepts of counterinsurgency. Prerequisite: None.

DA3801 International Terrorism (4-0) Summer/Fall

This course provides an in-depth examination of the origins, nature, and political/military roles of contemporary international terrorism. It briefly examines the early history of terrorism, the contending theories that purport to explain the sources of terrorist behavior, the different types of terrorism and terrorist actions, and the challenge international terrorism poses for American interests and foreign policy. Functional topics, such as the special problems posed by state-sponsored terrorism, the relationship between terrorism and the media, and the range of possible military responses to terrorism are also examined. The course will conclude by comparing and contrasting different national responses to the problem of international terrorism, and examining the difficulties faced by the United States in its efforts to find an effective policy response. Prerequisite: None.

DA3802 Seminar in Guerrilla Warfare (4-0) Winter/Summer

Have you ever wanted to seize state power from below? Have you ever been responsible for keeping others from doing so? This reading seminar is designed to examine the strategy and operational art of substate conflict. It examines the problems of social mobilization; underground organization, command and control, and security; alternate strategies of internal war, and competing theories of counterinsurgency. These and related issues are examined analytically and historically. Comparative cases are discussed and evaluated. Throughout the course, attention is also given to the manner in which such wars are conducted in the future. Prerequisite: None.

DA3880 History of Special Operations (4-0) Summer/Fall

What constitutes a “special” operation? This course considers special operations in a historical context, with emphasis given to their impact on war outcomes, the necessary conditions for their success, and the patterns of civil-military relations that emerge when elite forces are formed. Successes and failures in air, ground, and naval actions are equally considered. Historical studies from World War II to the present will provide the principle means of analysis to gain insights into the theory, practice, and effects of special operations and irregular warfare. Prerequisite: None.

DA3882 Deterrence, Coercion, and Crisis Management (4-0) Summer/Winter

This course surveys current theories of deterrence and coercive diplomacy, relating them to a variety of applied problems in crisis management. Special attention is given to political psychological factors, crisis communication styles, extended deterrence, and the implications of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction for conventional deterrence. Prerequisite: None.

DA3883 The Rise, Transformation and Future of the Nation-State System (4-0) Spring

This course provides students with a broad overview of the rise, proliferation, and possible fall of the major international organizing tool of the modern era: the nation-state. The course examines the rise of the nation-state in Europe, focusing on the specific political and economic factors that shaped the nation-state; the adoption of the nation-state system around the world, where it did not emerge organically; and the possible decline of the nation-state in the age of globalization. Does globalization mean the end of the nation-state, and if so, what kinds of organizational arrangements are likely to compete with and perhaps replace the nation-state? Prerequisite: None.

DA3900 Directed Studies in Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Supervised study in selected areas of special operations and low-intensity conflict to meet the needs of individual students. Format and content vary. Normally involves extensive assigned readings, individual discussions with the instructor, papers, projects, and/or examinations. May be repeated for credit if course content changes. Variable 1.0 - 4.0. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

<DA Courses DA4101-DA4470>

DA4101 Concepts in Information Operations (4-0) As Required

The emergence of information operations (IO) signaled a broadening of the original concept of information warfare (IW) beyond its early emphasis on electronic warfare and/or cyberspace-based attack and defense, to also include such notions as managing others' perceptions, public diplomacy, and the media. This broadening implied a new emphasis on content-based concepts of information operations as opposed to conduit-oriented issues of attack and defense of communications. This course surveys the entire scope of IO, keeping in mind the critical importance of IW, but also emphasizing the more conceptual issues having to do with strategy, doctrine, and organization. Applied issues are also examined, including such topics as the methods for sharing sensitive data with semitrusted allies, and the impact of information attack and defense on the future of force projection. Prerequisite: DA3101 or DA3103.

DA4102 Special Information Operations (4-0) Summer

This course serves as a project-oriented culmination of the studies of those specializing in the SOLIC "IO track." Students are given a specific, real-world problem and challenged to find the place for IO in developing solutions. The goal is both to mobilize the knowledge amassed from previous study and to use practical experience to gain insight into the issues of how IO can support special operations, and how special operations can support IO. Another key element of the course is the requirement that the students work as a team, employing either organizational concepts they have learned about or developing new ones that may be most suitable to the particular problem at hand. The course concludes with briefings to the sponsors of the given project undertaken. Prerequisite: None. Classification: TOP SECRET.

DA4104 Militaries and Technological Change (4-0) Summer

Technological advances have always influenced developments in military affairs, particularly fighting doctrines and forms of organization. This course surveys the major technological changes that accompanied industrialization: including advances in weapons, transportation, and communications systems; and examines the ways in which professional militaries adapted to these developments. Special attention is given to advances in information systems, as the goal of the course is to derive insights into how militaries might respond, doctrinally and organizationally, to an extended period of information-technology-driven changes in military affairs. Prerequisite: DA3101 or consent of the instructor.

DA4105 Special Topics in Information Operations (4-0) As Required

This course will focus on special topics in information and special operations. The list of topics to be analyzed for the seminar is announced at least one quarter prior to the offering of the seminar. Advanced study and research is conducted on topics not covered in other seminars. A major, graded research paper is required. Prerequisite: None.

DA4106 Trust, Influence, and Networks (4-0) Summer

This course examines the underlying nature of trust and influence, especially as they shape and are shaped by social networks. Students will acquire a theoretical foundation for these concepts and how they apply to a broad spectrum of activity, including work processes, military operations, underground movements, information and intelligence operations, governance, and the media; how trust and influence are established, maintained, exploited, and lost; and the functions they serve for individuals, organizations, and societies. Concepts will be illustrated with examples drawn from a variety of contexts. The course is aimed especially at students concerned with unconventional warfare, information operations, network-centric warfare, nation building, civil and military affairs, public affairs, terrorism, and intelligence. Prerequisite: None.

DA4107 Public Diplomacy to Psychological Operations (4-0) Fall

A nation uses various tools to minimize its weaknesses and limitations, and to maximize its strengths and capabilities in the international arena. This course aims to stimulate serious thought about a forgotten aspect of strategy and lay the groundwork for a revival of political-psychological planning and operations within a larger framework of U.S. national security strategy. Topics include: a historical overview of the sources of American diplomacy and values; strategic public diplomacy and the war of ideas; military public affairs and the media; and the power and utility of psychological operations. Case studies will be used throughout the course to reinforce important concepts. Prerequisite: None.

DA4108 Deception, Denial, Surprise, and Counterdeception (4-0) Summer/Fall

An impression about the threats a nation faces shapes its policies and actions in both war and peacetime. Consequently, information has a vital role in understanding threats and creating impressions. At the same time, it is uncertain whether the proliferation of communications technologies and the dissemination of vast amounts of information will keep senior leaders better informed or simply create more confusion. This course aims to stimulate serious thought about how deception, denial, and counterdeception can influence the outcome of a war or contribute to the favorable resolution of an international crisis. Topics include: the theory and process of deception; the role of intelligence; the process of protecting information that could be used by opponents to uncover some truth; and detecting deception. Case studies will be used throughout the course to reinforce important concepts. Prerequisite: None.

DA4110 Culture and Influence (4-0) Quarterly

This seminar aims to provide analytical tools for thinking about culture and the ways in which interacting with different cultures affects U.S. actions abroad, including military operations, democratization, economic development and foreign relations. The first section of the course offers a theoretical overview of academic debates about culture, drawing on literature from the fields of anthropology, political science, and economics. It includes topics such as the role of ethnicity, nationalism and identity in politics, efforts to democratize, economically develop and nation-build in other countries, and the possibility of a current global "clash of civilizations" in international affairs. The second section of the course aims to use first-hand experiences of students' interactions with various cultures - especially Iraq and Afghanistan - as case studies to apply and test the theoretical debates on culture presented in the first section of the class. Prerequisite: DA3101 and must have completed at least one full quarter of classes.

DA4120 Seminar on Jihadi Information Operations (4-0) Winter/Summer

This advanced seminar is designed as a follow-on course to DA 3120 for students pursuing theses or advanced research projects relevant to the field of Jihadi information operations. Course material will provide a more robust examination of the nature and types of IO campaigns used by both local and transnational Jihadi groups, but will also allow students to pursue and present specialized research on the topic. Prerequisites: DA3120 and a one-page statement of research.

DA4301 Fighting Undeclared Wars: American Approaches (4-0) Spring

How do the United States Government and its armed forces engage in undeclared wars, expeditions, and conflicts below the threshold of wars for the survival of the United States? This course examines those elements of American strategic culture that affect the United States' capacity to fight these “savage wars of peace.” Historical studies from the American colonial period to the present will enable students to determine the defining aspects of the American approaches to small wars. Prerequisite: None.

DA4303 The Scientific Study of War (4-0) Winter

This course is designed to treat the 'scientific study of war' as a debate. Can we study war and warfare using science as a model? If so, why is there such seeming reticence to doing so among policy circles, significant portions of the military community, and general public? What are the strengths and weaknesses of various scientific tools and what do we risk by eschewing science altogether? The course proceeds in two parts. In the first part of the class we examine the history of military thought as it pertains to the question of 'scientism'. In the second part of the course we look at various methodological approaches to understanding organized conflict and assess their strengths and limitations. These will include theory building (both rhetorical and formal), hypothesis testing using quantitative and qualitative approaches, as well as various forms of simulation. The substantive issues covered include the outbreak of war, the conduct of war, the termination of war, and the relationships between war, civil society, and economics. Prerequisite: Student must have completed at least two full quarters.

DA4410 Models of Conflict (4-0) Summer/Winter

This course deals with the problems faced by a rational decision maker, trying to maximize some payoff in a social setting. A distinction will be made between Type I behavior (optimization in a game against nature), Type II (optimization when faced with agents who react against the decision maker's perceived behavior), Type III (optimizations against strategic agents), and Type IV (cooperation with other agents). Applications include arms race models, treaty inspections problems, monopolistic behavior, coalition formation, and pursuit games. The computer is used as a modeling tool. Prerequisites: DA2410.

DA4450 Analytical Methods (4-0) Summer/Winter

This course will provide a basic understanding of social science research methodology. The emphasis will be on qualitative research methods to balance the analytical course sequence (including DA2410 and DA3410). The course will also discuss the key concepts of theory, law, and hypotheses. Finally, paying particular attention to case study methodology, we will focus on how theories should be tested. In the end, students will learn how to develop an argument; how to marshal evidence to support your argument; how to test your hypotheses; and how to anticipate and address counter-arguments. Prerequisite: DA2410.

DA4460 Alternate Research Methods and Defense Analysis (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course is the first in a two-quarter sequence intended to familiarize students with a range of methodological approaches applicable to graduate research across the spectrum of topics included within the concept of defense analysis. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are considered in this course, with equal emphasis given to case studies, heuristics, sociological approaches, statistical analyses and formal modeling and game theory. More esoteric approaches will also be briefly considered, as will the blending of methodologies, with the degree of attention given to these approaches being dependent upon specific student interest and need. Beyond the conceptual study of research methods, students will also be exposed to many examples of scholarly works that employ one or more of the methods being studied. The course, though focused on methods, also introduces the concept of research design to help prepare students for the second course in the sequence. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

DA4470 Designing Operationally Oriented Research Studies (4-0) Winter/Summer

A wide range of concepts of research design are studied in this course, the goal of which is to bring the student to the point of crafting a thesis proposal to guide his or her own master's level research. The close ties between choices about methodological approach and the forms of research design employed are considered, but the course's clear emphasis is on design. The larger concepts examined begin with strategic choices about the "placement" of studies on axes that range from pure theoretical to more policy-oriented applied research, and also reflect choices about pursuing research by quantitative or qualitative means, or some blending of the two. Many examples from scholarly works are used. Further design questions that are explored relate to the nuances of time-based "longitudinal" research of one or a few types of phenomena, and more "latitudinal," cross-sectional studies of a wider range of phenomena observed roughly simultaneously. Other detailed issues considered include how to avoid "selection bias," skewed analysis, omission of relevant variables at the inception of a research project. The ultimate focus of the course is on fostering research designs and methods that are rigorously fair-minded, thorough and impartial in application. Prerequisite: DA4460.

<DA Courses DA4500-DA4900>

DA4500 Special Topics in Strategic Analysis (4-0) As Required

This course will focus on special topics in special operations and low-intensity conflict. The list of topics to be analyzed for the seminar is announced at least one quarter prior to the offering of the seminar. Advanced study and research is conducted on topics not covered in other seminars. A major, graded research paper is required. Prerequisite: DA3802.

DA4600 Tracking and Disrupting Dark Networks (4-0) Spring/Fall

This course focuses on dark networks—covert and illegal activity such as drug-trafficking and terror networks.  The course's first objective is to identify and describe these networks. We use various social network software packages (e.g., UCINET, NetDraw, Pajek) to aid our identification and description efforts.  The second objective is to design intervention strategies to disrupt, destabilize and possibly destroy dark networks once they have been identified and described.  The course's focus is on the tactical and operational levels, although the implications for strategic and policy levels also may inform our discussions. Prerequisite: DA2410 or consent of the instructor.

DA4601 Terrorist Financing (4-0) Summer

This course will examine how terrorists fund their activities and how they can be tracked and thwarted through their financial networks and footprints. It will cover sources and methods of terrorist financing, including the role of charities, legitimate businesses, and crime; the use of both formal banking systems and informal hawala systems to transfer funds; and money laundering. It will also cover national and international structures, regulations, tools, and efforts to identify, track, capture, and eliminate terrorists and their financial support through their financial transactions. Concepts will be illustrated with case studies of terrorist groups and regions where terrorism is present. Prerequisite: DA3801.

DA4610 Dynamic Network Analysis (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course builds on DA4600 (Dark Networks) by offering additional substantive and methodological tools for analyzing relational networks. The course is pragmatically oriented in that it pays particular attention to issues concerning the collection and preparation of relational data in software programs such as Palantir, Analysts Notebook, Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access and moving to traditional social network analysis tools such as UCINET, Pajek and ORA (Organizational Risk Analyzer). This course will also explore what is being called dynamic network analysis where users not only examine the effects of actual ties (e.g., friendship, kinship) but also "virtual" ties (e.g., shared ideology, skills, knowledge, etc.). Finally, the course will introduce students to techniques using social network data (regression) and geospatial data (geospatial statistics) that will help students tease out which variables (e.g., centrality, education level) are causally related from those that are not. Prerequisite: DA4600 and with permission from instructor.

DA4620 Network Design (4-0) Fall/Winter

In 21st century operational and policy environments, more and more people operate in networks to get things done—community networks, policy networks, inter-agency networks, business networks, international networks etc. Defined as sustained relations between two or more social actors (e.g. individuals, groups, organizations, or nations), networks can be formal or informal and serve a range of purposes. Reliant on readings and cases, this course helps students develop a basic understanding of networks and the skill set to operate effectively within them. Primary networks of interest are those whose members come from different cultural, ethnic, organizational, and national backgrounds. Prerequisite: Must be two quarters into a program.

DA4710 Critical Thinking and Ethical Decision Making (4-0) Fall

This course explores both the contemporary and classical Western frameworks used to define effective ethical leadership and decision making. Emphasis is placed on the development of critical thinking and decision-making skills, the recognition of logical fallacies, the analysis of both civilian and military case studies, and the exploration of current ethical issues. Readings for this course span classical selections from such writers as Plato, Rousseau, Kant, and Mill through contemporary papers from the Joint Services Conferences on Professional Ethics. Prerequisite: None.

DA4760 The Military Advisor (4-0) As Required

This course examines the many roles of the military advisor-as leader, trainer, liaison—in a wide variety of settings, among very different groups of people, and under significantly different conditions. Lessons will be drawn from first-person accounts. What field craft lessons can be learned from past endeavors? What challenges might advisors expect to encounter in the future? This course is open to Department of Defense Analysis students only or by consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

DA4770 Ethnic Conflict (4-0) As Required

This course poses a series of questions, such as “what is a state?” and “what is a nation?”, in order to better understand when and why ethnic conflict erupts and persists. Often cited as the most prevalent form of warfare today, “ethnic conflict” as a term may conceal more that its reveals. For instance, strife in Northern Ireland and in Israel is often explained away as ethno-nationalist and ethno-religious in nature. On the face of it, both cases would seem to have much in common. However, once local histories and regional politics are considered, the two represent radically different models of (and for) ethnic conflict. This course will examine a series of such examples in order to better understand the origins, trajectory, and virulence of ethnic conflict. Prerequisite: DA3750.

DA4780 Political Anthropology: Methods of Social Control (4-0) Winter

The aim of this course is to examine in greater detail a variety of methods of controlling: social interactions, resources, societies, states, liberties… whatever it is that humans feel a need to—or discover they can—control. Questions that will lurk throughout the course are: Why does control matter? To whom does it matter most? Can we draw any generalizations cross-culturally? And to what extent might control differ across societies, strata, time, and space? The course is designed to be comparative and will draw on a series of case studies. Prerequisite: DA3750.

DA4810 Countering International Terrorism (4-0) Winter

This course examines the U.S. government's response to international terrorism. It examines policy, strategy, bureaucracy, the role of intelligence, and the media and information campaigns, as well as specific responses to terrorism, such as military force, covert operations, policing, economic sanctions, and diplomacy. The purpose of the course is to provide students a sound basis for developing and evaluating responses to terrorism. Prerequisite: None.

DA4820 Regional Seminar in Low-Intensity Conflict: Africa (4-0) Winter

This course teaches students how to analyze the nature of conflict in sub-Saharan Africa—who is likely to fight, where, why, and when, with special attention paid to the significance of regional complexities and local particularities. Eight cases are presented with two aims: to present a history of post-colonial conflict and to achieve regional balance. Students are specifically taught how to compare and contrast among different sets of factors that tend to feed conflict in Africa. Students also learn about sources of information to which they can turn in the future should conflict flare up in places with which they are unfamiliar. Prerequisite: Student must have completed at least two quarters of instruction in the Defense Analysis Department or NSA or consent of the instructor.

DA4830 Regional Seminar in Low-Intensity Conflict: Middle East (4-0) Spring

As part of the regional seminar series, this course examines political violence in the Middle East. The course focuses on the major systemic causes of violence in the Middle East at both the state and nonstate levels. At the state level, sources of violence include the consolidation of state power in fragmented societies, survival strategies by weak states, and competition for scarce regional resources. Violence by nonstate actors is also examined, including violence associated with the Jihadist movement and with the conflict over Palestine. Prerequisite: None.

DA4840 Regional Seminar in Low-Intensity Conflict: Europe and the Transcaucasus (4-0) Spring

As part of the regional seminar series, this course examines low-intensity conflict issues in Europe and the Caucasus. The seminar reviews the theoretical literature on political violence and analyzes the recent history of European and Caucasus-based terrorism and insurgency. It offers a series of detailed case studies of local organizations and conflict, and focuses on functional issues in Europe and the Caucasus. Prerequisite: None.

DA4850 Regional Seminar in Low-Intensity Conflict: Latin America (4-0) Spring

As part of the regional seminar series, this course examines insurgencies in Latin America. The seminar reviews the history of the continent and the Caribbean from colonial times to the present; examines theoretical literature on political violence; and analyzes the recent history of Latin American-based terrorism and insurgency. It offers a series of detailed historical case studies of insurgent organizations and conflicts. Prerequisite: None.

DA4860 Regional Seminar in Low-Intensity Conflict: Far East (4-0) Spring

As part of the regional seminar series, this course examines low-intensity conflict issues in the Far East. The seminar reviews the theoretical literature on political violence and analyzes the recent history of Asian-based terrorism and insurgency. It offers a series of detailed case studies of local organizations and conflict, and focuses on functional issues in the Far East. Prerequisites: None.

DA4883 Networks and Nation-States (4-0) Summer

This course focuses in detail on the relationship between transnational networks and the contemporary nation-state system. It emphasizes that transnational networks manifests themselves in many forms: social; political; philanthropic; criminal. Whatever the future holds for the nation-state system it is clear that transnational networks have taken on an important new (or reconfigured) role with the rise and uneven consolidation of globalization since the 1970s. The course begins with some basic definitional and conceptual issues. This is followed by sections on the history and contemporary significance of regional and global networks of various types. The overall objective of this course is to gain a better understanding of the structure and dynamics of transnational networks; those of a malevolent political character or organized criminal syndicates, as well as benevolent networks of differing types. This is done in a fashion that tries to retain a relatively discrete definition of the term "network", but also makes clear that they have been, and continue to be a more widespread element of world politics and international relations than is sometimes assumed. In this spirit, the geographical range of the course is global and both discussion and research projects can and will focus on Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and beyond. Prerequisite: Students should have completed at least two quarters of course work, or instructor's permission.

DA4900 Advanced Directed Studies in Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

(Variable hours 1.0 - 4.0.) Supervised study in selected areas of special operations and low-intensity conflict to meet the needs of individual students. Format and content may vary. Normally involves individual research under the direction of the instructor and submission of a substantial paper of graduate seminar quality and scope. May be repeated for credit if course content changes. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

Joint Information Operations - Curriculum 698

Academic Associate

Hy Rothstein, Ph.D.

Code DA/Ro, Root Hall, Room 212

(831) 656-2203, DSN 756-2203

FAX (831) 656-2649

hsrothst@nps.edu

Program Manager

Jennifer J. Duncan

Code DA, Root Hall, Room 219

(831) 656-3584, DSN 756-3584

FAX (831) 656-2649

jduncan@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The goal of this curriculum is to educate military personnel and civilian officials of the United States and its Allies in the strategic and operational dimensions of information relative to the use of force as an instrument of statecraft.

The curriculum is designed for both the specialist who will be assigned to an information operations position and the generalist who will be assigned to an operations directorate. The curriculum includes a core of military art and operations, the human dimension of warfare emphasizing psychological warfare and military deception, analytical methods, and a technical sequence customized for each student that may include concentrations in cyber systems and operations, electronic warfare, intelligence support to JIO and computer network operations. Additional areas of concentration are available to meet specific student and organizational requirements. Finally, each student will write a thesis relevant to the field of information operations. The JIO curriculum is designed to develop the following competencies in its graduates:

Requirements for Entry

The Joint Information Operations curriculum is open to all branches of the military, federal employees, international military officers and government sponsored civilians. U.S. officers must be eligible for a TOP SECRET clearance with access to Sensitive Compartmented Information based on a Special Background Investigation completed within the last five years. A baccalaureate degree earned with above average academic performance and a minimum APC of 265 is required.

Entry Date

The Joint Information Operations curriculum is a six-quarter course of study with entry dates in January and July. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Information Operations are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curricular program.

Master of Science in Information Operations

The Master of Science in Information Operations degree will be awarded in accordance with the following degree requirements:

  1. This degree requires 45 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, of which 15 hours must represent courses at the 4000 level.
  2. Completion of an acceptable thesis or capstone project.

The Chairman of the Defense Analysis Department and the Academic Associate of the Joint Information Operations curriculum approve each individual program.

Subspecialty

Completion of the 698 curriculum qualifies an officer as an Information Operations Subspecialist. The curriculum sponsor is the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy (OSD-P).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Command Positions at the LTC/CDR level and above

Staff Officer, Plans or Operations: Joint Headquarters

Information Operations Officer at the LTC/CDR level and above on service staffs, JTFS, and combatant commands

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

DA3882

(4-0)

Deterrence, Coercion, and Crisis Management

DA2010

(4-0)

Technical Writing and
English Composition

MN3121

(4-0)

Organizational Design

DA2410

(4-0)

Modeling for Military
Decision Making, I

Quarter 2

DA3101

(4-0)

Warfare in the Information Age

DA3250

(4-0)

Anatomy of Intelligence

DA4450

(4-0)

Analytical Methods

DA3410

(4-0)

Modeling for Military
Decision Making, II

Quarter 3

DA4107

(4-0)

Public Diplomacy to Psychological Operations

DA4106

(4-0)

Trust, Influence, and Networks

DA3104

(4-0)

Computer Network Attack and Defense

DA3802

(4-0)

Seminar in Guerrilla Warfare

Quarter 4

DA3180

(3-2)

Electronic Warfare Principles and Applications

DA4108

(4-0)

Deception, Denial, Surprise Attacks and Counterdeception

DA3750

(4-0)

Anthropology of Conflict

DA3120

(4-0)

Jihadist Information Operations

Quarter 5

DA3801

(4-0)

International Terrorism

DA3720

(4-0)

The Rise of Religious Violence

DAXXXX

 

 

DA4600

(0-8)

Tracking and Disrupting Dark Networks

Quarter 6

DA4105

(4-0)

Special Topics in IO

DA4104

(4-0)

Militaries and
Technological Change

DA3105

(0-8)

Conflict in Cyberspace

DA4710

(0-8)

Critical Thinking an Ethical Decision-making

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Joint Information Operations - Curriculum 698
Subspecialty Code: None

  1. Military Art and Operations: Graduates will understand the organization, formulation, and execution of national security strategy and national military strategy; the effects of technical developments on warfare; the capabilities and roles of military forces throughout the entire spectrum of conflict; and current defense issues.
  2. Emerging Security Challenges: Graduates will explore major security issues among states and between states and nonstate actors, with emphasis placed on examining the sources of instability and violence including ethnic conflict, insurgency, and terrorism.
  3. Information Operations (IO): Graduates will understand the role of information in winning wars. An important aspect of this requirement is to examine the principles of information operations, to include psychological operations, military deception, computer network operations, electronic warfare, public affairs and command and control warfare, and how the proper integration of IO can contribute to U.S. information dominance of the twenty-first century battlefield. Additionally, graduates will understand the role of physical (kinetic) attack and civil-military operations (CMO) in support of DoD informational objectives.
  4. Analytical Methods and Applications: Graduates will have a foundation in analytical methods and their application to military modeling, simulations, and gaming. Close attention will be given to the ways in which such analytical techniques can be used in heuristic and decision-making tools for strategic and operational planning. Attention will be given to both historical and contemporary military applications with particular focus on the ways in which such techniques can be used to address issues of interest to the joint information operations community.
  5. Information Systems: Graduates will have a systems-level understanding of information systems and their vulnerabilities as well as capabilities.
  6. Intelligence Processes and Applications: Graduates will know intelligence processes and their applications to joint warfare through the national level, with particular emphasis given to the role of intelligence in planning, executing, and terminating information operations.
  7. Thesis: Graduates will demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research and analysis, and demonstrate proficiency in presenting the results in writing by means of a thesis appropriate to this curriculum.

Special Operations/Irregular Warfare - Curriculum 699

Academic Associate

Gordon H. McCormick, Ph.D.

Code DA/Mc, Root Hall, Room 214

(831) 656-2933, DSN 756-2933

FAX (831) 656-2649

GMcCormick@nps.edu

Program Manager

Jennifer J. Duncan

Code DA, Root Hall, Room 219

(831) 656-3584, DSN 756-3584

jduncan@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Special Operations/Irregular Warfare curriculum is designed to provide a focused course of study of the conflict spectrum below general conventional war. Graduates of this curriculum will possess a thorough knowledge of the broad range of factors involved in the planning and conduct of these forms of conflict and a detailed understanding of the role of special operations and related forces in U.S. foreign and defense policy. The curriculum examines the sources and dynamics of inter-state and intra-state conflict; the challenge these forms of conflict have posed and are likely to increasingly pose for U.S. security planning; the doctrinal and institutional evolution of the U.S. special operations community; the recent history of political violence and “small wars"; the history of irregular warfare; and contemporary perspectives on low-intensity conflict resolution. The curriculum provides the graduate with a strong background in the areas of strategic analysis, decision making, organization theory, the technological revolution in military affairs, and advanced analytical methods.

Requirements for Entry

The Special Operations/Irregular Warfare curriculum is open to all branches of the U.S. military, civilian employees of the U.S. Government, and international military and government officials. U.S. officers must be eligible for a TOP SECRET clearance with access to Sensitive Compartmented Information based on a Special Background Investigation completed within the last five years. A baccalaureate degree earned with above average academic performance and a minimum academic profile code (APC) of 265 is required.

Entry Date

The Special Operations/Irregular Warfare curriculum is a six-quarter course of study with entry dates in January and June. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Manager/Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Defense Analysis degree are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curricular program. The program currently offers 10 specialty tracks. Other specialty tracks can be tailored to meet student interests. The current tracks include Irregular Warfare, Information Operations, Terrorist Operations and Financing, Strategic Forecasting and Decision Making, Operations Analysis, C4I Systems, Combat Systems, Financial Management, National Security Affairs (Regional Studies) and National Security Affairs (Stability/Reconstruction).

Master of Science in Defense Analysis

The Master of Science in Defense Analysis degree will be awarded in accordance with the following degree requirements:

  1. This degree requires 45 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, of which 15 hours must represent courses at the 4000 level in at least two disciplines. Within the course program there must be a specialization sequence consisting of at least six courses.
  2. In addition to the 45 hours of course credit, an acceptable thesis must be completed.

The Department of Defense offers the Special Operations/Irregular Warfare curriculum 699 and the Information Operations curriculum 698.

The Chairman of the Defense Analysis Department approves each individual program.

Subspecialty

Completion of the 699 curriculum qualifies an officer as a Special Operations Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 2500P. The curriculum sponsor is the Commanding General, Special Operations Command.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Command Positions at the LTC/CDR level

Assistant Operations Officer, U.S. Army Special Forces Group

Staff Officer, Plans or Operations: USSOCOM

Action Officer, Counterterrorism Directorate, ASD (SO/LIC)

Staff Officer, Plans or Operations: Theater Special Operations Commands

Special Warfare Plans: CINCLANT/CINCPAC/NAVEUR

Chief, Intelligence/Plans: COMNAVSPECWARCOM

Joint Plans/Doctrine: COMNAVSPECWARCOM

Joint Staff Action Officer: J-3, Special Operations Directorate (J-3, DDSO)

Typical Course of Study

(Irregular Warfare Track)

Quarter 1

DA3802

(4-0)

Seminar in Guerrilla Warfare

MN3121

(4-0)

Organizational Design for Special Operations

DA2410

(4-0)

Modeling for Military Decision Making, I

XXXXXX

(4-0)

Emphasis Elective

Quarter 2

DA3882

(4-0)

Deterrence, Coercion, and Crisis Management

DA3410

(4-0)

Modeling for Military
Decision Making, II

DA3880

(4-0)

History of Special Operations

DA3101

(4-0)

Warfare in the Information Age

Quarter 3

DA4450

(4-0)

Analytical Methods

DA3750

(4-0)

Anthropology of Conflict

DA4410

(4-0)

Models of Conflict

DA48XX

(4-0)

Regional Seminar in
Low-Intensity Conflict (1st)*

Quarter 4

DA3801

(4-0)

International Terrorism

DA3102

(4-0)

Psychological Operations
and Deception

DA3883

(4-0)

The Rise, Transformation

and Future of the Nation-State System

DA4835

(4-0)

Islamic Insurgencies

Quarter 5

DA4760

(4-0)

The Military Advisor

DA4500

(4-0)

Special Topics in Strategic Analysis

DA4106

(4-0)

Trust, Influence, and Networks

DA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 6

DA4710

(4-0)

Critical Thinking and
Ethical Decision Making

DA48XX

(4-0)

Regional Seminar in
Low-Intensity Conflict (2nd)*

XXXXXX

(4-0)

Emphasis Elective

DA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

* Five courses in Low-Intensity Conflict covering different regions of the world will be offered; students will select two of the three.

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Special Operations/Irregular Warfare - Curriculum 699
Subspecialty Code: 2500P

  1. Strategy and Policy: Graduates will develop an ability to think strategically, analyze past operations, and apply historical lessons to future joint and combined operations, in order to discern the relationship between a nation's political interests and goals and the ways military power may be used to achieve them. This requirement is fulfilled by completing the first of three Naval War College courses leading to Service Intermediate-level Professional Military Education (PME) and Phase I Joint PME credit. (Required only for USN and USMC students.)
  2. The Dynamics of Inter-State and Intra-State Conflict: Students will have an understanding of the political, ethnic, and cultural dynamics that explain the outbreak of war between and within modern states. Particular attention should be given to the issues of intra-state conflict; unconventional forms of inter-state military rivalry; the integrated role of force and diplomacy in crisis management operations short of war; problems of escalation in a crisis environment; military alliance behavior; the dynamic differences between zero-sum and nonzero-sum conflicts; the special problems associated with suppressing and resolving zero-sum engagements; and military and nonmilitary approaches to conflict resolution. Students must have a close understanding of the prevailing analytical literature on these and related subjects and be able to apply this literature to a broad range of contemporary and historical cases.
  3. Terrorism, Social Revolution, and Unconventional Warfare: Graduates will have a detailed understanding of the problems of domestic and international terrorism, social revolution, and other forms of irregular conflict. Close attention must be given to problems of both threat and response. The student must have a close knowledge of the prominent contending theoretical perspectives on the problems of terrorism and social revolution; a detailed knowledge of the operational and organizational dynamics underlying each of these forms of conflict; and a strong working understanding of the ways in which these and similar forms of irregular conflict have been countered historically. Where appropriate, the courses designed to satisfy this requirement should survey the U.S. experience in irregular warfare as well as that of other states that have been prominently engaged in such actions in the past, such as Great Britain, France, Israel, and the former Soviet Union.
  4. Historical and Comparative Perspectives on Special Operations: Students will have a close understanding of the historical use of special operations forces, to include how these and similar forces have been organized, trained, equipped, directed, and employed. Attention should be given not only to the U.S. experience, but to other national experiences as well, such as those of Great Britain, Germany, Italy, and the former Soviet Union. Similarly, this examination should not be restricted to contemporary history alone, but should extend back into the historical record to examine the ways in which special operations and related forces have been employed creatively to support state objectives in the more distant past. Throughout this inquiry, attention should be given to the contemporary lessons that can be drawn from historic experience.
  5. Special Operations Doctrine, Concepts, and Institutions: Graduates will have a detailed and conceptual understanding of the development of doctrine for special operations. Work in this area should focus, first, on the defining events and experiences that have stimulated doctrinal and institutional innovations in SO and, second, on the forms these innovations have taken. This examination should cover the period from the end of World War II through the post-Cold War era. These and related issues should be explored creatively in an effort to uncover the appropriate roles, missions, strengths, and limitations of military power in the emerging multipolar environment.
  6. Crisis Management and the Contingent Use of Military Power: Students will have an understanding of the political role played by military power in operations short of war, the problem of military crisis management, and the contingent use of force in support of local U.S. policy objectives. Attention should be given to the "signaling" role that can be played by military force, the special problems of deterrence and coercion in a crisis environment, and the military consequences of deterrence failure. The student should have a close knowledge of the historical record of "armed diplomacy" throughout the post-war period. This should include knowledge of the individual cases of U.S. military intervention in the Third World, from Lebanon (1958) to Somalia (1993). Attention should be given to both the theoretical and empirical literature on these subjects to provide the student with an understanding of the special political and operational issues associated with operating in a crisis environment.
  7. Comparative Cases of and Responses to Regional Conflict: Graduates will have a close knowledge of historical and contemporary "small wars" and other forms of low-intensity conflict in Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East. The courses that satisfy this requirement should examine the pertinent theoretical literature on political violence in the region in question, review the recent history of regionally-based terrorism, insurgency, and communal conflict, the regional and international implications of these conflicts, and any functional issues that are of particular interest or concern in the particular area under investigation, such as the religious or communal sources of political violence or the relationship between narcotics and insurgency.
  8. Special Operations and the Revolution in Military Affairs: Students will have an understanding of the ways in which the proliferation of new and emerging technologies is changing the shape of modern warfare. An important aspect of this requirement is to examine the likely impact of these developments on the dynamics and characteristics of twenty-first century warfare within both the inter-state and intra-state arena. The student must have a working knowledge of the major technological developments and trends in this area (both lethal and nonlethal) and their conflict implications.
  9. Special Operations and Information Warfare: Graduates will have an understanding of the likely and potential implications of information warfare on future special operations. An important aspect of this requirement is to examine the principles of information warfare and examine the ways in which SOF can contribute to U.S. information dominance on the twenty-first century battlefield. This examination should address the problem of information dominance at the inter-state and intra-state level of war.
  10. Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Proliferation and Counter-Proliferation: Students will have an understanding of the developing problem of WMD proliferation and counter-proliferation. Students may have a technical or operational perspective on WMD. The student must have an understanding of the political dynamics of WMD proliferation and an understanding of recent and possible future trends in these areas. Close attention should also be given to the problem of counter-proliferation and the ways in which SOF might approach this task. Students having a technical focus should have a working knowledge of nuclear and non-nuclear WMD technologies.
  11. Analytical Methods and Applications: Each student will receive grounding in analytical methods and their application to military modeling, simulations, and gaming. Close attention will be given to the ways in which such analytical techniques can be used as heuristic and decision-making tools for strategic and operational planning. Attention will be given to both historical and contemporary military applications, with particular focus on the ways in which such techniques can be used to address issues of interest to the special operations community.
  12. Strategic and Operational Complexity: Special Operations (SO) is a style of warfare. No traditional single academic discipline can adequately address the educational requirements of the SO community, so an interdisciplinary approach is required. Each student will develop a course of study that permits him or her to pursue a disciplinary orientation that best suits their particular academic background and interests within the substantive limits of the other ESRs.

Department of Information Sciences

Chairman

Dan C. Boger, Ph.D.

Code IS, Glasgow West, Room 3005

(831) 656-3671/2214, DSN 756-3671/2214,
FAX (831) 656-3679

dboger@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Research

Alexander Bordetsky, Ph.D.

Code IS, Root Hall, Room 225

(831) 656-2287, DSN 756-2287

FAX (831) 656-3679

abordets@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Operations

Glenn R. Cook

Code IS, Glasgow West, Room 3012

(831) 656-2778, DSN 756-2778

FAX (831) 656-3679

grcook@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Distance Instruction

Steven J. Iatrou

Glasgow West, Room 3011

(831) 656-3770, DSN 756-3770

FAX (831) 656-3679

sjiatrou@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Resident Academics

Thomas J. Housel, Ph.D.

Code IS, Root Hall, Room 239

(831) 656-7657, DSN 756-7657

FAX (831) 656-3679

tjhousel@nps.edu

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Tarek Abdel-Hamid, Professor (1986); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1986.

Albert Barreto, Lecturer (2006); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2011.

Richard Bergin, Visiting Assistant Professor (2002); M.S., University of Southern California, 1998.

Dan C. Boger, Chairman, Department of Information Sciences and Professor (1979); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1979.

Alexander Bordetsky, Professor (2000); Ph.D., Chelyabinsk State Technical University of Russia, 1982.

Eugene Bourakov, Research Associate (2002); MSEE, Chelyabinsk State Technical University of Russia, 1974.

Donald Brutzman, Associate Professor (1994); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1994.

Raymond J. Buettner, Jr., Associate Professor (1999); Ph.D., Stanford University, 2003.

Glenn R. Cook, Senior Lecturer (2000); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1994, 2003.

Dale M. Courtney, Lecturer (2000); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1996.

James Ehlert, Research Associate (2004); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1995.

Edward Fisher, Lecturer (2005); M.A., California State University, 1989.

Shelley P. Gallup, Research Associate Professor (1999); Ph.D., Old Dominion University, 1998.

Joshua D. Green, Lt Col, Lecturer (2011); M.S., Air Force Institute of Technology, 2004.

Susan Higgins, Lecturer (1999); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1988.

Thomas J. Housel, Professor (2001); Ph.D., University of Utah, 1980.

Susan Hutchins, Research Associate Professor (1994); M.S., San Diego State University, 1983.

Steven J. Iatrou, Senior Lecturer (2000); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1992.

Nelson J. Irvine, Research Assistant Professor (2003); Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 1973.

Erik Jansen, Senior Lecturer (1994); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1987.

Magdi N. Kamel, Associate Professor (1988); Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1988.

Anthony Kendall, Lecturer (1999); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1980.

David Kleinman, Research Professor (1994); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1967.

Randall Maule, Visiting Associate Professor (2003); Ph.D., University of Florida, 1987.

Mark Nissen, Professor, (1996); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1996.

John Osmundson, Research Associate Professor (1995); Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1968.

Jim Robinette, CDR, USN, Lecturer (2011); M.A., Naval War College, 2007.

Brian J. Steckler, Lecturer (2002); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1994.

William J. Welch, Lecturer (2000); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1987.

Emeritus Professors

Daniel R. Dolk, Professor (1982); Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1982.

Carl R. Jones, Professor Emeritus (1965); Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School, 1965.

Michael G. Sovereign, Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., Purdue University, 1965.

Brief Overview

The Department of Information Sciences provides in-residence graduate education, as well as a continuum of career-long learning opportunities, in support of defense requirements in the areas of information sciences, systems, and operations. The Department maintains an internationally respected research program in selected areas of information sciences, systems, and operations, and has the capability of developing research programs in additional areas of information sciences that are required to support graduate education.

Degrees

The Department provides the following degree programs:

Master of Science in Information Technology Management

The degree of Master of Science in Information Technology Management will be awarded at the completion of the appropriate interdisciplinary program in Curriculum 370. The Master of Science in Information Technology Management requires:

  1. Completion or validation of core courses in each of the following disciplines: Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Systems Management.
  2. Completion of a minimum of 52 hours of graduate-level courses, at least 20 hours of which are at the 4000 level.
  3. Completion of an acceptable thesis.

The candidate's program must be approved by the Chairman, Information Sciences Department.

Master of Science in Information Warfare Systems Engineering/Master of Science in Electronic Warfare Systems Engineering

The degree of Master of Science in Information Warfare Systems Engineering/Master of Science in Electronic Warfare Systems Engineering will be awarded at the completion of a multidisciplinary program in Curricula 595 and 596, respectively. The Master of Science in Information Warfare Systems Engineering/Master of Science in Electronic Warfare Systems Engineering programs have not been reviewed by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.  The Master of Science in Information Warfare Systems Engineering/Master of Science in Electronic Warfare Systems Engineering requires:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 45 quarter-hours of graduate-level work, of which at least 15 hours must represent courses at the 4000 level.
  2. Graduate courses in at least four different academic disciplines must be included and a course at the 4000 level must be included in two disciplines.
  3. An approved sequence of at least three courses, constituting advanced specialization in one area, must be included.
  4. In addition to the 45 graduate hours of course work, an acceptable thesis must be completed.

The candidate's program must be approved by the Chairman, Information Sciences Department.

The Master of Science in Remote Sensing Intelligence

The degree of Master of Science in Remote Sensing Intelligence will be awarded at the completion of the appropriate interdisciplinary program in Curriculum 475. The Master of Science in Remote Sensing Intelligence requires:

  1. Completion or validation of core courses in each of the following disciplines: Space Systems, Physics, Information Systems, Computer Science, and National Security.
  2. Completion of a minimum of 43 graduate level credits, including the required course sequence with alternate courses approved by the Program Manager.
  3. Completion of an acceptable thesis.

The candidate's program must be approved by the Chairman, Information Sciences Department.

Master of Science in Systems Technology

The degree of Master of Science in Systems Technology (Command, Control, and Communications) will be awarded at the completion of the Joint Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) interdisciplinary program, Curriculum 365, carried out in accordance with the following degree requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 45 quarter-hours of graduate-level work in four different academic disciplines, of which at least 15 hours must represent courses at the 4000 level in at least two of the disciplines.
  2. Within the course program there must be a specialization sequence consisting of at least three courses.
  3. In addition to the 45 hours of course credit, an acceptable thesis must be completed.

The candidate's program must be approved by the Chairman, Information Sciences Department.

Master of Science in Network Operations

The degree Master of Science in Network Operations will be awarded at the completion of the multidisciplinary program in Curriculum 386 requiring:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 36 quarter-hours of core graduate course work, of which 12 quarter hours must be at the 4000 level.
  2. In addition to these 36 hours of core work, students must complete an approved specialization sequence of courses in one of the following areas:
    1. Decision Superiority
    2. Network Operations
    3. Information Systems Management
  3. Complete an acceptable thesis or research project approved by the Chairman, Information Sciences Department.

Doctor of Philosophy in Information Sciences

The Department offers the Ph.D. degree in Information Sciences. The program begins with advanced course work guided by the Departmental Ph.D. Committee, which leads to qualifying examinations. The primary emphasis then shifts to the student's research program, culminating in the Ph.D. dissertation. Three areas of primary concentration within the field of information sciences are available: information systems, command and control, and information operations/warfare. Interested potential students may obtain further details by contacting the Information Sciences Ph.D. Program Director, Code IS, 589 Dyer Road, Room 200A, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943-5100. An applicant to the Ph.D. program will need to apply to the School Admissions Office formally (see www.nps.edu/Admissions/PhD/index.html), and will need to submit: an application letter describing general background, interests and experience in research, and career goals; official or certified copies of all academic transcripts; results of a GRE general examination taken within the past five years; and three letters of references relating to your suitability to pursue a doctoral degree. Send these materials to the Director of Admissions, 1 University Circle, He-022, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943. Detailed admission procedures may vary depending on the individual's location and position. However, in all cases, the student must fulfill the general school requirements for the doctoral degree. Residency for this program is one year at the minimum, and the program generally requires three years beyond completion of a master's degree to complete.

Information Sciences Course Descriptions

Courses listed are approved, but may not be offered each year.

CC Courses

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CC0001 Seminar Series in C4I (0-2) As Required

Seminars (consisting of guest lectures, video teleconferences, and field trips) are scheduled to provide background information on specific Joint C4I systems and activities. Prerequisite: None.

CC0810 Thesis Research for C4I Students (0-8) As Required

Thesis research time for JC4I students. Prerequisite: None.

CC3000 Command and Control (4-0) Fall

No single activity in military operations is more important than C2! This course focuses on the fundamental theories of both command and control as they apply in current and emerging operational environments including but not limited to the nuances of cross domain C2 involving cyber, information, and kinetic operations. Emphasis is placed on understanding established theories associated with control of forces and systems and how application of these theories varies according to changing forces and systems and how application of these theories varies according to changing and evolving environments, technologies and organizations. Theoretical concepts may include but are not limited to decision making, organizational design, control, motivation, and information theories. Additionally, the course will explore the evolution of information systems to include current enterprise and cloud architectures and how they impact control processes and the ability to command. Cases involving US national security and military events are studied as a means of identifying successes and failures in the application of these theories. Prerequisites: none.

CC3102 Combat Modeling and Analysis for Command and Control (3-2) As Required

Emphasis is on the use of mathematical and computer models to help solve operational problems or improve the efficiency and effectiveness of control. Topics include but are not limited to the evolution of computer based experimentation and modeling, fundamental mathematical modeling techniques, examination and evaluation of current modeling software, and the interpretation and application of model outputs to real-world situations. The course is the basis for later courses on the use of modeling techniques to conduct detailed analysis and evaluation of command and control processes and systems. Prerequisites: CC3000 and OS3105 (may be concurrent). Classification: U.S. Only, SECRET.

CC3250 Command, Control and Communications (C3) (4-0) Winter, Summer

CC3250 is designed to introduce technical curriculum students to command and control theory and processes as well as the first principles associated with modern electronic communication systems of interest to military operations. Specific course topics include command and control (C2) elements and concepts, the technology influence on C2 as well as fundamental communications principles and concepts to include: signal representations, noise considerations, link analysis, analog/digital modulations and Defense Department systems within the Global Information Grid concept. Prerequisites: SI1001, SI1002, or equivalent; SI2011 or equivalent.

CC3900 Special Topics in C4ISR (V-V) As Required

Supervised study in selected areas of command, control, and communications to meet the needs of individual students. May be repeated for credit if course content changes. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of the Academic Associate.

CC4101 Systems Engineering for Joint C4I (4-2) As Required

Provide an introduction to systems engineering by performing systems engineering activities, using the tools that a systems engineer uses, analyzing the procedures a systems engineer follows, and performing an actual systems design on a joint C4I system element. The course will use practical examples to explain the fundamental principles, while maximizing the hands-on practical systems design activities. A required course for the 365 curriculum. Prerequisites: CC3000 and OS3604. Classification: TOP SECRET.

CC4103 Joint C4I Systems Evaluation (2-4) As Required

Experiments in determining C4I system effectiveness using wargaming and simulation. Design of experiments. Survey of current C4I systems evaluation techniques. Prerequisites: CC4101 and U.S. citizenship. Classification TOP SECRET with Eligibility for SI/SAO.

CC4250 Enterprise Architecture (4-0) Fall, Winter, Summer

The focus of the course is the DoD enterprise and extended enterprise in terms of its information architecture. The course will look at Enterprise Architecture at the strategic, tactical and operational levels. The activities will include analysis of state of the art architectures, modeling enterprises, viewpoints and communications requirements. The student will analyze existing architectures, learn the relevance and limitations of enterprise architectures and to learn to appreciate the strengths and limitations of various approaches. The student will also become familiar with Service oriented architecture, the Information Technology Infrastructure Library and the role of components in the delivery of infrastructure products and standards. Prerequisites: CC3000, IS3502.

CC4900 Advanced Study in C4ISR (V-V) As Required

Supervised study in selected areas of command, control, and communications to meet the needs of individual students. May be repeated for credit if course content changes. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of the Academic Associate.

CC4913 Policies and Problems in C2 (4-0) As Required

Study of the fundamental role C2 systems fulfill in operational military situations, including the full range of military operations. Analysis of the changing role of organizational structures and processes as well as technologies and impacts on C2 systems requirements and designs. Consideration of the complexities imposed on C2 systems as the force structure becomes more heterogeneous, as in the case of NATO and NGOs. Case study of selected incidents and systems with a focus on current problems. This course is specifically for students in the 365 curriculum. Prerequisite: CC4103.

CC4920 Multi-Criteria Analysis (4-0) As Required

The major goal of this course is to learn where and how to search for the best solutions for problems with contradictory criteria. This course will introduce methodology for correct statement and solution of engineering optimization problems, called the Parameter Space Investigation (PSI) method. This technique has been widely integrated into various fields of industry, science, and technology. The PSI method is implemented in the comprehensive software system MOVI (Multicriteria Optimization and Vector Identification) that will be used and distributed during the course. Prerequisites: None.

IO Courses

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IO0001 Seminar Series in IO Topics (0-2) As Required

Seminar lectures in Information Operations. Prerequisite: None.

IO0810 Thesis Research for IO (0-8) As Required

Information Operations thesis research. Prerequisite: None.

IO3100 Information Operations (4-0) As Required

This course, available in the classroom or through asynchronous Internet-based education, provides a survey of Information Operations (IO) along the time line of peace, to conflict, and back to the cessation of hostilities. Students study the specific methods and elements of IO and how they integrate with other elements of national power to meet national security objectives. Prerequisite: None.

IO4300 Planning and Execution of Military Operations in the Information Environment (3-2) Fall

This course refines the students' ability to develop and analyze IO plans. Students learn to integrate seemingly disparate disciplines (national security affairs, information warfare/operations, computer science, physics (kinetic warfare), and operations analysis) into a cogent operations plan as an integral part of a theater campaign plan. Prerequisites: NW3230, IW3101 or IO3100, OS3105 or equivalent OS course. Classification: US only with SECRET clearance.

IS Courses

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IS0001 Seminar Sessions (0-2) As Required

Seminar Sessions in Information Systems for IST Students. Prerequisite: None.

IS0810 Thesis Research (0-8) As Required

Thesis research time for IST Students. Prerequisite: None.

IS2000 Introduction to Information Technology (3-1) As Required

Provide an introduction to the field of Information Technology Management and the functions and responsibilities of the information technology manager. Offered as part of the E-FIST certificate for distance learning only. Prerequisite: None.

IS2010 Introduction to Information Technology (1-2) As Required

This course provides an overview of the technology used to implement modern information systems. Extensive use of hands-on laboratories and demonstrations provide students with a thorough introduction to microcomputer architecture and design, the Internet and Web page development, local area network (LAN) operation and administration, databases, management information systems, and computer security. The strong emphasis on hardware and software technical issues in this course establishes the foundation necessary for studying IT management issues during the follow-on course. Prerequisite: None.

IS2020 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Using Visual Basic (2-3) As Required

A first course in computer programming using VB, DoN's IT21 mandated standard, as a high-level, event-driven, object-oriented, programming language. Course emphasis will be on planning, program development, graphical user interfaces, rapid prototyping, program construction, data types, operations, control flow, arrays, records, file I/O, database access, random number generators, and event-driven OOP structures. Prerequisite: None.

IS2025 Fundamentals of Networks (3-2) As Required

Undergraduate level Network fundamentals class for the E-FIST program. Security Clearance: CONFIDENTIAL.

IS3001 Information Sciences for Defense (3-0) Spring/Summer

The purpose of this overview course is to introduce first quarter students from the Information Systems and Technology and the Joint C4I curricula to an overview of the information environment in the Department of Defense. During this quarter students will be exposed to the tactical and business systems, technologies, organization, culture, policies and issues regarding the acquisition, operations and management of technology. Specific topics include the DoD information environment, enterprise architecture and systems, systems development polices and processes as well as critical issues of security, privacy and issues of identity. Prerequisite: None.

IS3181 Integrating and Leveraging Information Technologies (3-0) As Required

The attributes of information technology are studied in conjunction with the management aspects of developing and maintaining systems in support of DoN and the joint services. This course is heavily project- and case-study oriented. Minicases force the student to apply theory from reading to realistic DoN settings. These case studies will force trade-offs, resource allocation decisions, development of strategy for specific problems, etc. Prerequisite: Lead program students only.

IS3200 Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design (3-2) Winter/Summer

This course covers the concepts, models, and processes used by enterprise systems analysts to determine: 1) The current situation of an organization that desires to improve itself; 2) The problems and opportunities in this situation; and 3) The plans and specifications that can be formed to feasibly address these problems or opportunities. The course covers how enterprise -level system analysis is performed to successfully define and develop systems requirements how to apply these to system design. Additionally, the fundamentals of information system design are discussed and applied. The overall goal for the course is for the students to understand the system development life cycle, system analysis and design methodologies, and have applied them in a team project within the class. Prerequisite: None.

IS3201 Enterprise Database Management Systems (4-2) Winter/Summer

Enterprise database management systems are the core of all information systems capabilities. The course provides the foundational knowledge, language, and capabilities to create, operate and manage enterprise-level data management systems. Students will learn the essential activities of how to store, retrieve, manage, and control data using a relational database management system. They not only will learn how to build a database application using modern database tools, and but also how to deploy database technology in a larger, organizational context to support problem solving. Further, by the time students have completed the course, they will understand the major steps required to manage complex database projects. Prerequisite: None.

IS3202 Thin-Client Database Systems Development (4-2) Winter

At the core of modem information systems is the ability for remote users to gain access to centralized data management services. This course is designed to familiarize students with the various approaches for developing database-driven, interactive, dynamic capabilities for accessing data through thin-client systems. These approaches include client-side scripting using Java scripts; server-side scripting using Active Server Pages; and Extensible Markup Language (XML) technologies. An integrated development environment is used throughout the course to demonstrate the application of these approaches. Students are expected to develop a fully functional, dynamic capability using the approaches/technologies learned in class. Prerequisites: IS3200 and IS3201, or consent of the instructor.

IS3210 Information and Knowledge Management Issues in Defense (4-0) Spring

This elective course on defense knowledge and information management integrates theory with practice to help prepare current and future leaders to leverage knowledge and knowing for competitive advantage in learning organizations. Knowing refers to knowledge in action and is concerned with activities (e.g., decisions, behaviors, work) in the organization. Using emerging knowledge-flow theory as its intellectual base, the theoretical part of the course helps professionals understand: how knowledge is both critical and unique; how it builds and depends on information; and how to design effective work processes, organizations, and technologies around dynamic knowledge and information. Using application cases for group critique, the problem-based learning part of the course examines a diverse set of knowledge-based processes and organizations in operation today, and it offers both principles for and experience in identifying strengths and weaknesses. Students also select new or operational knowledge-based processes for evaluation, and work individually as consultants to assess and redesign them around knowledge flows. This course may be offered as an online course. You can view more details at the NPS online website. Prerequisite: None.

IS3301 Computer-Based Tools for Decision Support (3-2) Winter/Spring

This course introduces the principles for designing, implementing and using computer-based tools to support a variety of decision-making situations. A key objective of the course is to introduce managerial decision-making technology in a format that is not too abstract or too mathematical. We cover a variety of analytical techniques for decision making in complex environments, involving single or multiple criteria made under certainty and uncertainty. Students learn the difference between building "private" models and "public" models and are introduced to software engineering practices for engineering quality models. Exemplary computer-based applications that support or involve the use of formal decision making methods and tools are discussed. Group projects will supplement and reinforce the course's learning objectives. Prerequisites: IS3200, IS3201.

IS3302 Database Management for Decision Support (3-2) As Required

Database management systems that support decision making constitute essential components of information-driven organizations. These systems are employed in a wide array of activities, ranging from combat support to logistics and administration. This course covers the essential aspects of database management systems and their role in supporting decision making. The course is a hands-on, technically oriented course that provides students with an understanding of conceptual database management techniques as well as the application using decision support tools. This course is intended for students in the ISO (356) and IC4I (365) curricula . Prerequisite: None.

IS3330 Research Methods for Information Sciences (3-0) Fall/Winter

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of research design for research in the Information Sciences (IS) field. This overview consists of understanding the preliminary considerations that go into selecting a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design. These include knowing the definition for these different approaches, considering philosophical worldviews, reviewing the literature, understanding the use of theory, anticipating ethical issues, and developing writing strategies. We will discuss the process of research as it relates to each approach in IS research. This process includes writing an introduction, specifying a purpose statement, and developing research questions and/or hypotheses. This course will focus on the methods and procedures for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies. Prerequisites: None.

IS3333 Thesis Research for Information Sciences (2-0) Spring

Introduction to the thesis research process and requirements for IS Department students. Prerequisite: None.

IS3450 RF and EW Concepts in Networked Systems (2-0) Fall

This course giving a broad, non-technical overview of concepts in Radio Frequency (RF) Communications used in networked communications systems. The course covers RF signaling terminology and the basics of RF communications via examining the basic concepts such as RF waveforms, data rates and bandwidth, and RF atmospheric limitations. Additionally, the course discusses how RF is used in several modern communications systems such as Wireless LANs (WiFi), Cell Phone Systems (GSM and LTE), and Land Mobile Radios (LMRs).

IS3460 Networked Autonomous and Unmanned Systems (4-0) Summer

This unclassified course examines autonomous and unmanned systems and platforms from a systems and operational perspective. Historical and modern systems are discussed to include Industrial Control Systems, botnets, UxVs, etc. The nature of autonomy versus unmanned systems is examined. Opportunities and security issues presented by the growing dependence upon these systems and platforms are studied. The ethics of using unmanned and autonomous platforms and systems for warfare is examined, along with the ethics of attacking such systems when integrated into society. Operational applications within the private and public sectors, as well as the military, are discussed. Current and future research into autonomy is examined. Prerequisites: None.

IS3502 Network Operations I (4-2) Winter/Summer

This course introduces the basics of network operations. Topics covered include but are not limited to configuring and managing networks, routers, and servers (file, e-mail, web, DNS, printer, etc.); network monitoring and traffic analysis; storage and bandwidth allocation; quality of service, performance monitoring and analysis; deploying and managing firewalls and malware/intrusion detection/prevention systems; configuring access controls; managing and retaining logs; setting up VPNs and secure connections; business continuity and disaster recovery planning; managing software patches; and network policy and compliance. Prerequisites: None.

IS3504 Modern Network Operating Systems: Windows 2003 Server (3-2) As Required

This course focuses on the planning, design, installation, configuration, and management of network operating systems used throughout DoD and private industry. Network operating systems are compared with single-user operating systems to understand differences and similarities. Popular client/server and peer-to-peer systems are examined to provide a thorough understanding of the correct applications of each. Network labs provide in-depth analysis of such topics as file server configuration and administration, multilevel network security procedures, and global file server synchronization processes. Prerequisite: IS3502.

IS3710 Identity Management Operations (3-0) As Required

This course will integrate theory with practice to help prepare students with ways of thinking about how to leverage Identity for competitive advantage in operational environments. The focus of this course is on the design architecture for integrated systems which will allow for the collection, analysis, storage, and dissemination of information related to the identity of a person. This course is one of several that will collectively comprise the requirements for Identity Management specialization tracks in both the Information Science and Computer Science degree programs. Completion of four courses: CS3686, CS3699, IS3710, and IS3720, will meet the requirements for earning the Federal/DoD Identity Management Certificate offered by NPS. Prerequisites: None.

IS3720 Identity Management Policy (3-0)

The goals for the Identity Management Policy Course are to provide the student with the necessary ways to think about the creation or implementation of Identity Management policies. The focus is to provide students with a background on the approaches to the verification of personal identity and the implications in a digital environment. As individuals become more conscious of the collection of data regarding their actions, the student must understand the implications of privacy in this changing environment. There will be a strong, case-based focus on the laws, ethics, and moral implications of the collection, analysis, storage, and dissemination of personal data so that the student can prudently apply the appropriate policy. Additionally, the policies and procedures for the provisioning, propagating, maintaining, and removal of personally identifiable information will be discussed. The student will be required to develop a case study for a scenario that will address the policy implications and create a solution to meet the operational requirements. Prerequisite: None.

<IS Courses IS4010-IS5810>

IS4010 Technology in Homeland Security (4-0) Fall/Winter/Spring

Government agencies in today's Information Age are more dependent than ever on technology and information sharing. This course provides students involved in homeland security with a broad overview of homeland security technology, information systems, sensors, networks, knowledge management, and information security. The course focuses on technology as a tool to support homeland security personnel regardless of functional specialty. The study of principles and theory is combined with homeland security examples and cases. The student will gain a perspective on the important role of senior management in enterprise-level computing and their personal role as change agents. The knowledge and skills acquired will make the students more effective technology users and help them recognize opportunities where the application of technology solutions can provide a strategic advantage and therefore make a contribution to homeland security. The ultimate objectives are to show students how homeland security professionals can exploit technology and not be exploited by it, and to wisely use technology in the most efficient and productive manner. This course is open to students in the Homeland Security Program only. Prerequisite: None.

IS4031 Economic Evaluation for Enterprise Technology Investments (4-0) Spring

The objectives of this course are to provide the student with the tools and methodologies that will allow for the objective economic evaluation of enterprise information systems from a business perspective. The course will focus on the alignment of IT investment to strategic goals and productivity, the methods of obtaining IT services through outsourcing, and the importance of managing to the needs of the enterprise. Included in this course are the components for creating a Defense Business Case, options theory/real options and market comparables. The goal is for the students to be able to include critical economic factors into IT investment decision-making. Prerequisite: None.

IS4052 Imaging Spectrometry Theory, Analysis, and Applications (3-2) Winter

This course is designed to enable scientists to analyze and exploit data from hypersectral sensors. The course utilizes a blend of lectures, demonstrations, case histories, and hands-on imaging spectrometer data analysis. The physical properties of Earth surface materials are defined as the basis for imaging spectrometry utilizing visible/near-infrared (VNIR), short wave infrared(SWIR), and long wave infrared (LWIR) data. Students will learn the theory behind imaging spectrometry measurements and systems, how to analyze the data, and apply lessons learned to analysis of a variety of imaging spectrometer datasets. Prerequisites: PH3052. Corequisites: IS4053.

IS4053 Spectral and Polarimetric Tools and Analysis Techniques (3-2) Winter

Analysis of multi-dimensional data sets, from multipsectral and optical polarimetric imaging systems. Nature of spectral data, analysis methods with application to military and civil problems. Primary focus is on the use of statistical techniques (spectral imaging). Basic theory of optical polarimetric imaging and analysis. Prerequisite: PH3052.

IS4054 Remote Sensing III: Analysis Techniques for Passive Imaging Systems (3-2) Spring

Analysis techniques for thermal imagery from ground, airborne, and satellite systems. Applications in imaging systems, and to Overhead Persistent Infrared Systems (OPIR). Tools and applications for systems, applications to military an intelligence problems. TS/SCI ; Prerequisites: SS3001, PH3052.

IS4055 Analysis Techniques for RADAR Imaging Systems (3-2) Summer

Active imaging systems (RADAR), tools for analysis, application to civil and military problems. Theory of non-literal analysis techniques for polarimetric RADAR(interferometric synthetic aperture RADAR). Application of RADAR to development of digital elevation models (DEMs) and terrain classification. Prerequisites: PH3052.

IS4056 Geographic Information Systems (3-2) Summer

Theory and application of geographic information systems. Topics include spatial data models, map projections, data fusion, satellite surveying, spatial query and analysis, and cartographic principles. Application of GIS to decision making processes and the solution of current real-world problems. Prerequisites: None.

IS4060 Analysis Techniques for Laser Imaging Systems (LiDAR) (3-2) Spring

Exploitation of terrestrial and airborne laser scanning systems for military and intelligence purposes. Technology basics are defined, operational systems described, and analysis techniques developed. Applications developed include the production of Digital Elevation Models and terrain classification, and are addressed by examples and in laboratory applications of commercial software. Current state of the art single return and waveform system exploitation is developed. Prerequisites: PH3052.

IS4182 Enterprise Information Systems Strategy and Policy (4-0) Fall/Spring

Enterprise Information Systems Strategy and Policy: How to Be an Effective CIO or IT Strategist. This course aims to make students fluent in architecture-based decision making for enterprise systems strategy and policy. Students should become capable of significantly enhancing the prospects of an enterprise through effective, strategic use of IT architecture. The student should be capable of suggesting significant improvements in existing or proposed architectures, demonstrating both analysis and synthesis skills. Topics include: the enterprise and extended enterprise; information processing for competitive superiority; technology evolution and adaptive stresses; the role of the era; information systems architecture and enterprise architecture; architecting; U.S. Government architecture efforts; 000 imperatives; information superiority; network-centric warfare; and architecture synthesis and evaluation. Prerequisite: None.

IS4188 Collaborative Technologies (3-2) As Required

Collaborative technologies and multiple-agent, decision-support architectures become the central application elements of emerging GIG, FORCEnet, DARPA NICCI, and other sensor/decision maker networking initiatives. The first part of the course is based on the analysis of collaboration in different human organizations and the requirements of agent-based, decision-support architecture. The second part of the course is focused on studies of intelligent agents and multiple-agent architecture. From the beginning of the course, students are involved in hands-on practice with wireless collaborative environments including GPS units, pocket PCs, laptops, and other devices. We start with using the peer-to-peer Groove collaborative tool and NPS agents-facilitators. We later move on to several demonstrations, including the client-server GENOA system implementation for Homeland Security and PACOM POST virtual meetings via the Lotus Same Place System. Prerequisite: None.

IS4201 Enterprise Data Management (4-2) As Required

An elective course that will focus on the technological infrastructure, as well as the management processes, related to the operations and maintenance of enterprise data management systems. Prerequisite: IS3201.

IS4210 Knowledge Superiority (3-0) As Required

This elective course on knowledge superiority integrates theory with practice to help prepare current and future leaders to leverage knowledge and knowing for competitive advantage in learning organizations. Knowing refers to knowledge in action, and is concerned with activities (e.g., decision, behaviors, work) in the organization. Using emerging knowledge-flow theory as its intellectual base, the theoretical part of the course helps professionals understand how knowledge is both critical and unique, and equips them to design effective work processes, organizations, and technologies around knowledge flows. Using real-time cases for group critique, the problem-based learning part of the course examines a diverse set of knowledge-based processes and organizations in operation today, and offers both principles for and experience in identifying strengths and weaknesses. Students also select new or operational knowledge-based processes for evaluation, and work individually as consultants to assess and redesign them around knowledge flows. This course may be offered as an online course. You can view more details at the NPS website. Prerequisites: IS3201 and IS3301, or IS3302, or equivalent with consent of the instructor.

IS4220 Technology Enabled Process Improvement (3-2) Winter/Summer

The focus of this class is on practical application of Business Process Reengineering (BPR), lean six sigma (L6S) and TQL principles to enable innovative redesigns of core defense processes. These tools are principles that define a set of heuristics or "rules-of-thumb" that help the analyst accomplish the transformational goals required in dramatically changing core processes to create greater value. The course makes use of process analysis and measurement methodologies to ensure productivity increases as a result of the process redesigns. The students will define an existing process, model it in simulation software and analyze the current state. Then through the application of learned principles, demonstrate the application of IT to the process and compare the before and after to determine impact. Prerequisites: IS3200 and IS4031, or consent of the instructor.

IS4300 Project Management for Enterprise Systems (3-2) Winter/Spring

The objective of this course is to educate the student in areas of great concern to the DoD in the field of IT project management to include software engineering and risk management. The course examines both the technological tools of software production as well as the software engineering techniques for software project management. Software testing, metrics, and reliability are also covered. DoD software standards and metrics programs are included. Prerequisites: CS3030 and IS3200 and IS3171 and OS3004.

IS4301 Data Warehousing, Data Mining, and Visualization (4-2) Winter

This elective course is designed to provide students with the basic concepts of data warehousing, data mining, and visualization. The course emphasizes both technical and managerial issues and the implications of these emerging technologies on those issues. The course has a distinctly “real-world” and DoD orientation that emphasizes application and implementation over design and development. A state-of-the-art system/tool will be used to help students understand and apply the concepts presented in the class. Prerequisites: IS3201 and IS3301 and IS3200, or consent of the instructor.

IS4505 Wireless Networking (3-2) Spring

This course provides students with wireless networking fundamentals essential to design, install, administer, and support IEEE 802.11-compliant wireless networks. The course content and format is aligned with the Planet3 Wireless Certified Wireless Network Administrator (CWNA) Official Study Guide. Students who successfully complete this course will be prepared to take the CWNA certification exam. Prerequisites: IS3502 or CS3502 and EO3502, or consent of the instructor.

IS4520 Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World (4-0) Spring

This course introduces system dynamics modeling for the analysis of organizational policy and strategy. Students will learn to visualize an organization in terms of the structures and policies that create dynamics and regulate performance. The goal is to use the analysis and modeling techniques of system dynamics to improve their understanding of how complex organizational structures drive organizational performance, and then to use that understanding to design high-leverage interventions to achieve organizational goals. We use computer-based simulations to model long-term side effects of decisions, systematically explore new strategies, and develop our understanding of complex systems (analogous to the "flight simulators" that pilots use to learn about the dynamics of flying an aircraft). Prerequisite: None.

IS4550 Internet Appliances and Me-Centric Computing (3-2) As Required

In the next decade, computing as we know it will be radically transformed around highly personalized devices that know their users, know how to get work done, and can interact with billions of devices and services over the Internet. Computing empires built up on traditional OSI 7-level stacks will lose their preeminence. In the emerging new world of Internet appliances, the center of the universe will become the individual and products will be built around knowledge of how to serve that user. Billions more people will gain access to computing power this way, and our daily experience will shift from endless efforts to tame incomprehensible software products to being masters of a universe of appliances and services that aim to please. This transition is inevitable, because hyper-complex technology isn't welcomed or assimilated fast enough, and pressures exist to find better paths to market. The clear path for powerful technology is to reach many more customers through a radical simplification of what customers must do to employ it. This revolution is underway now, and it will fundamentally alter the landscape for IT, IT management, and strategic uses of technology. The course will look into various technologies including personalization, services, wireless communications, Internet (including IP v. 6), and identity services that are driving the changes. Student projects will create Me-Centric innovations pertinent to their domains of interest. Prerequisite: None.

IS4700 Introduction to the Philosophy of Science (3-2) As Required

This course is designed to help prepare the prospective Ph.D. in Information Sciences candidate to engage in original research. The focus will be on understanding the underpinnings of doing science by studying the work of modern philosophers of science. The course will review the epistemologies (economic, behavioral, physics-based, and general systems-based) serving as a scaffolding for the development of original theory development in the field of IS. The characteristic features of the received view, hypothetico-deductive formalism will be reviewed, along with the modern challenges to this framework. The distinction between the instrumental-realist positions will be examined in light of its implications for theory development in IS. Students should understand the requirements for theory generation in terms of the underlying assumptions of given epistemic perspectives as a result of taking this course. Prerequisite: None.

IS4710 Qualitative Methods for Research (3-2) As Required

Qualitative Methods for research will be explored in this course. Quantitative research methods are powerful, but not all research questions and settings are amenable to such methods. In particular, early stage exploratory research (e.g., "how" and "why" questions), studies in which the phenomena of interest are intertwined with their contexts (e.g., where people, technology, and organizations interact), investigations of individual and small-group behaviors (e.g., leaders, project teams, user groups), understanding rare and idiosyncratic events (e.g., catastrophes, new technology introductions, organizational changes), and research in which potential sample sizes are small, or measures cannot be operationalized practically, are all candidates for qualitative research methods. Additionally, combining qualitative and quantitative methods represents a compelling tactic for triangulation through data analysis. In this course, students learn to appreciate when qualitative research methods are appropriate, and they gain both theoretical and experiential knowledge about how to employ such methods. Prerequisite: None.

IS4720 Quantitative Methods for Research (3-2) As Required

This course equips IS doctoral students with the quantitative methods necessary to support dissertation research, using real-world project data and case studies. Topics include: defining research objectives, formulating and testing hypotheses, designing experiments, developing analytic and simulation models, collecting data, analyzing data, validating models, using quantitative software tools, and presenting results in written and oral reports. Prerequisite: None.

IS4730 Design of Experiments for Research (3-2) As Required

Design of experiments for Ph.D. students. Prerequisites: IS4700 and IS4710 and IS4720.

IS4790 Research Seminar for Ph.D. Students (0-3) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Research seminar for students in the IS Ph.D. program. Prerequisite: None.

IS4800 Directed Study in Information Sciences (V-V) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Directed study of selected areas of information science to meet the needs of the individual student. Intended primarily to permit students to pursue in-depth subjects not fully covered in formal class work or thesis research. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chairman. Grading on Pass/Fail basis or standard grading criteria are both available.

IS4925 Special Topics in Information Systems (V-V) As Required

Special topics courses are first-run courses that are intended to gauge student response and interest. After a course has run once, if successful, it will be submitted to the academic council for final approval. Prerequisite: None.

IS4926 Network Operating Centers (4-0) Winter

The course provides analytical background for implementing telecommunications management systems and integrating management infrastructure into the information grid design. It targets operations support for GIG, terrestrial, satellite, and mobile wireless network operation centers. The course combines classroom activities with research and design experience in telecommunication networks configuration, fault, and performance management. In the center of analytical work is the project-based study of management functions and information models for SNMP MIBs, TMN, and architectures. The advanced study issues include an introduction to knowledge-based management and intelligent agent technology. The applications target the needs of GIG operations, C4ISR networks management, Joint Experimentation, Fusion Centers, and Network Operation Centers environment. They employ features of LAN/WAN networks, ATM networks, PCS networks, satellite/wireless networks, UAV, HALO, and other platforms. During the course work, students will gain basic knowledge of several commercial telecommunications management systems used by the NOCs: Spectrum, HP Open View, Tivoli, Unicenter TNG, Micro Muse, etc. The classroom, studies, and projects teamwork are facilitated by the on-line distance learning and shared electronic workspace environment. Prerequisite: None.

IS4927 Special Topics in Information Systems II (V-V) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Special topics courses are first run courses that are intended to gauge student response and interest. After a course has run once, if successful, it will be submitted to the academic council for final approval. Prerequisite: None.

IS5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) As Required

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

IW Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<IW Courses IW0001-IW4960>

IW0001 Seminar Series for IW Students (0-2) As Required

Seminar series for IW students. Prerequisite: None.

IW0810 Thesis Research for IW Students (0-8) As Required

Thesis research work for IW students. Prerequisite: None.

IW3101 Military Operations in the Information Environment (4-0) As Required

This course provides a survey of military operations in the information environment along the time line of peace, to conflict, and back to cessation of hostilities. This is accomplished by studying the theoretical underpinnings and implementation of military actions in the information environment to influence decisions in both the biological domain (human) and non-biological/cyber domain (hardware, software and spectra). Topics include but are not limited to military-civilian relationships, human cognition and decision-making, social influence, cyberspace operations, C2 structures, legal issues and considerations in IO, the joint planning process, and intelligence support to IO. Prerequisite: None. Classification: SECRET; U.S. Citizenship.

IW3301 Influence Modeling (3-2) As Required

This course explores influence models and analysis in support of military requirements. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of modeling techniques as applied to operations in the information environment whether through cyberspace or other media, how to determine whether or not an influence model is appropriate for use and how to evaluate the utility of various models and modeling techniques. The student will become familiar with the process of designing, constructing and applying influence models within the context of military operations. Prerequisites: IW3101 or IO3100.

IW3502 Information Warfare Networks (4-2) Summer

This course provides students with an understanding of data and computer communications. The course coverage includes the essential topics of data transmission and networking of data/voice/multimedia along with network protocols. Students are provided with a first principle understanding of the current status, and future technology directions of Internet-Protocol (IP) based data and communication systems through discussions of related standards and accepted practices. Course coverage includes: Guided-wave transmission lines (cable, twisted-pair and fiber), signaling aspects of multiplexing, flow and error control at the various layers of the network topology. High-speed local area networking devices (hubs, switches, and routers) and methods (including virtual local area networks (LANs)) are also discussed. Some network security methods and procedures are briefly presented at the end of the course. Prerequisite: EO2652, CS3030, and EO2512 or equivalents.

IW3921 Non-Kinetic Targeting (3-0) Spring

This course explores the complex nature of engaging targets in the information environment. Emphasis is on the myriad disciplines involved in using information systems as weapons systems and information as projectiles. Using the framework of joint fires and targeting processes students will develop an understanding of how to engage an opponent through the use of information related capabilities (IRCs) and networked computer and social systems to achieve effects in the physical domain. This course is conducted at the unclassified level utilizing open source information. Prerequisite: IW3101 or IO3100.

IW3922 Non-Kinetic Targeting II (2-0) As Required

This course is taught in conjunction with IW3921 and explores the practical application of non-kinetic targeting concepts as described for IW3921 through lecture and laboratory work. Prerequisite: IW3101 or IO3100 or by consent of the instructor; Corequisite: IW3921. Classification: This course is conducted at the SECRET level.

IW4301 Advanced Topics in Influence Modeling (4-0) Summer

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop an Influence Model and to use this model to conduct analysis in support of actual military requirements. Students will design, construct, and analyze Influence Models in collaboration with fellow students. Work completed as part of this course may be included in one or more Naval Postgraduate School Technical Reports. Each project may be briefed to appropriate senior DoD leadership as well, if deemed suitable for such briefings by the instructor. Students must have access to a United States Government computer network and have access to "For Official Use Only" (FOUO) data. SECRET-level work may be conducted as well by special arrangement with the instructor. Prerequisite: IW3301.

IW4500 Information Warfare Systems Engineering (3-2) Spring

This course applies Systems Engineering Principles to design an Information Warfare System. Project teams will develop an Information Warfare System from requirements determination through and including preliminary design. The five pillars of Information Warfare will be used in the design process, including information security considerations. Lectures will discuss both Systems Engineering principles and Information Warfare concepts. Prerequisite: IW3101.

IW4800 Directed Study for IW Students (V-V) As Required

Directed Study for IW/EW students. Credit hours are variable and must be chosen on a case-by-case basis. Prerequisite: None.

IW4925 Special Topics in Information Warfare (V-V) As Required

Special topics courses are first-run courses that are intended to gauge student response and interest. After a course has run once, if successful, it will be submitted to the academic council for final approval. Prerequisite: None.

IW4950 Advanced Information Warfare Systems (3-2) As Required

This course examines the use of modern EW systems in support of information warfare operations. Modern EW systems studied include IDECM, Towed FO decoys, AIEWS, MAWS, ASPJ, Advanced Standoff Jammers, Stand-in Jamming, DECM, and Situational Awareness. Advanced topics, including stealth, directed energy weapons, modern threats, GPS jamming, Hard kill/Soft kill interactions, MASINT, and DRFM systems, are discussed. The laboratory includes visits to EW manufacturers and invited lecturers on advanced topics. Prerequisite: None. Classification: SECRET.

IW4960 Advanced Information Warfare Systems (3-2) As Required

The characteristics and performance of modern EW systems are discussed. Course topics include: the Advanced Radar Threat, Architecture and Technology of EA systems, EA against modern radar systems, Noise and DECM EA systems, DDS and DRFMs, characteristics of modern ES systems, Expendables and Towed Decoys, directed energy systems, and stealth principles. Prerequisite: EO4612 or consent of the instructor.

Network Operations and Technology-Operations (NWOT-OPS) - Academic Certificate in Network Operations and Technology-Operations - Curriculum 271

Program Officer

Steven J. Iatrou

Code IW/Is, Glasgow West, Room 3011

(831) 656-3770, DSN 756-3770

FAX (831) 656-3679

isoaa@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Network Operations and Technology-Operations (NWOT-OPS) academic certificate program is designed to provide Navy personnel with an opportunity to obtain advanced education in the operational arts supporting information domain via asynchronous web-based media. The four courses in the NWOT-OPS program represent the foundation on which modern warfare is built: Command and Control, Space Operations, Network Operations, and Information Operations. This four-course sequence is also the bedrock of the N2/N6-sponsored Network Operations and Technology (NWOT) curricula at the Naval Postgraduate School.

The ISO academic certificate provides the fundamental education needed to achieve information superiority, thus enabling full spectrum dominance in the information and cognitive domains. The actions associated with information operations are wide-ranging—from physical destruction to psychological operations to cyber operations. The NWOT-OPS academic certificate provides the fundamental education needed to achieve information superiority through information dominance and decision superiority, thus enabling full spectrum dominance in the information and cognitive domains.

The courses are provided through asynchronous web-based media (i.e., the Internet) because the Navy recognizes that this education should be available to their personnel regardless of geographic limitations. So, if students have access to the Internet, they have access to tools necessary to help meet U.S. national security objectives in the information domain.

All courses in this academic certificate are graduate-level courses carrying full NPS academic credit. They provide the baseline for advanced education in operationally essential disciplines.

Requirements for Entry

Applicants must have earned a baccalaureate degree to be considered for admission.

Entry Date

At the beginning of any quarter in the NPS academic year. These courses may be taken in any sequence and they need not be taken all in the same academic year.

Program Length

Four quarters.

NWOT-OPS Academic Certificate Requirements

To earn the NWOT-OPS academic certificate you must pass all four courses with a C+ (2.3 Quality Point Rating (QPR)) or better in each course and an overall QPR of 3.0 or better. Students earning grades below these standards will need to retake the courses to bring their grades within standards or they will be withdrawn from the program.

Program Sponsors/Advisors

OPNAV N2/6

Required Courses

CC3000 Command and Control

IO3100 Information Operations

IS3502 Network Operations I

SS3011 Space Technology and Applications

Network Operations and Technology-Technology (NWOT-TECH) - Academic Certificate in Network Operations and Technology-Technology - Curriculum 272

Program Officer

Steven J. Iatrou

Code IW/Is, Glasgow West, Room 3011

(831) 656-3770, DSN 756-3770
FAX (831) 656-3679

isoaa@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The NWOT-TECH academic certificate provides education in the fundamentals of network systems technology. This education is essential to helping the Navy reach information superiority in the operational environment. It also offers advanced education in areas essential to enabling global networked communications, including: databases, systems analysis and design, decision support systems, and network security.

The NWOT-TECH academic certificate is provided through asynchronous Web-based media (i.e., the Internet) because the Navy recognizes that this education should be available to their personnel regardless of geographic limitations. If you have access to the Internet, you have access to tools necessary to help meet U.S. national security objectives in the information domain.

All courses in the NWOT-TECH academic certificate are graduate-level courses carrying full NPS academic credit. They provide the baseline for advanced education in essential disciplines in networking and information technology.

Requirements for Entry

Applicants must have earned a baccalaureate degree to be considered for admission.

Entry Date

Program entry dates are at the beginning of any quarter in the NPS academic year. These courses may be taken in any sequence and need not be taken in the same academic year.

Program Length

Four quarters.

NWOT-TECH Academic Certificate Requirements

To earn the NWOT-TECH academic certificate students must pass all four courses with a C+ (2.3 Quality Point Rating (QPR)) or better in each course and an overall QPR of 3.0 or better. Students earning grades below these standards will need to retake the courses to bring their grades within standards or they will be withdrawn from the program.

Program Sponsors/Advisors

OPNAV N2/6

Required Courses

CS3606 An Introduction to Information Systems Security

IS3200 Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design

IS3201 Enterprise Database Management Systems

IS3301 Fundamentals of Decision Support Systems

Fundamentals in Information Systems Technology (Electronically Delivered) (EFIST) - Curriculum 276

Program Officer

Steven J. Iatrou

Glasgow West, Room 3011

(831) 656-3770, DSN 756-3770

FAX (831) 656-3679

isoaa@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This program has been designed to enhance students' knowledge of and productivity in the Navy's information technology fields. The courses are Web-based and will be delivered entirely online. They provide an introduction to the field of Information Technology Management and the functions and responsibilities of the information technology manager.

The programming course meets DoN's IT21 mandated standard, as a high-level, event-driven, object-oriented, programming language. Course emphasis is on planning, program development, graphical user interfaces, rapid prototyping, program construction, data types, operations, control flow, arrays, records, file I/O, database access, and event-driven OOP structures.

A fundamentals course focuses on the basics of computer networking. Since networking is an underpinning to our technology-driven forces, understanding the basics of computer networking is important to any technology professional interested in building a solid technology understanding, and is an essential precursor to other courses in the Information Systems and Information Technology arenas.

All courses in the eFIST academic certificate are undergraduate-level courses carrying full NPS academic credit. They provide the baseline for advanced education in essential disciplines in information technology.

Requirements for Entry

A bachelor's degree is not required. There are no prerequisites.

Entry Date

Contact the Program Manager.

Program Sponsors/Advisors

Naval Network Warfare Command (NETWARCOM), Navy Information Professional Center of Excellence (IPCOE), Naval Education and Training Command (NETC)

Required Courses

IS2000

 

Introduction to
Information Technology

IS2020

 

Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming using Microsoft Visual Basic

IS2502

 

Network Fundamentals

Knowledge Superiority (KS) Academic Certificate in Information Systems and Operations - Curriculum 277

Program Officer

Mark E. Nissen, Ph.D.

Code 06/IS, Glasgow West

Room 2006

(831) 656-3570, DSN 756-3570

FAX (831) 656-3679

mnissen@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Knowledge is hailed widely as one of the very few, sustainable sources of competitive advantage for organizations in the Information Age. But knowledge is distributed unevenly through the enterprise, clumping noticeably in particular people, organizations, locations, and times of application. Getting knowledge to flow—from where and when it is located to where and when it is needed for action—represents an essential aspect of knowledge-based competition.

However, knowledge is distinct from information and data, and competing on a knowledge basis requires more than just setting up high-bandwidth computer networks, shunting great volumes of data bits around the world, and making large online information repositories broadly accessible. Although such network, data, and information steps are important for knowledge flows, they are clearly insufficient. Rather, flows of knowledge build upon flows of network signals, data, and information, as knowledge—particularly tacit, experiential knowledge—resides principally in the minds of people and the routines of organizations. Hence, competing on a knowledge basis involves more than technology: it requires deft integration of people, processes, organizations, and technologies alike. This pushes knowledge-based competition beyond the limited, technical realm of many information sciences, and makes it a relatively challenging, but quintessentially effective basis for sustainable competitive advantage. The study of Knowledge Superiority focuses precisely on such sustainable, knowledge-based, competitive advantage.

The Knowledge Superiority Track develops and builds upon technical systems understanding in networks, databases, systems analysis, decision support systems, and like subjects, to develop a higher level design capability in students. To wit, students learn more than designing only technical systems: they learn to integrate such technical system designs into socio-technical system designs, the latter of which include people, processes, and organizations, in addition to technology. This higher level design capability enables graduates to escape the relatively narrow confines of purely technological jobs, and to support direct knowledge flows, attention focusing, and decision making at the highest levels of the military and government.

The Knowledge Superiority academic certificate is provided through asynchronous, Web-based media (i.e., the Internet) because DoD recognizes that this education should be available to their personnel regardless of geographic limitations. So, if students have access to the Internet, they have access to the tools necessary to help meet U.S. national security objectives in the information domain. All courses in the Knowledge Superiority academic certificate program are graduate-level courses carrying full NPS academic credit.

Requirements for Entry

Applicants must have earned a baccalaureate degree to be considered for admission and have completed fundamental college-level courses in databases and computer networks.

Program Length

Four Quarters

KS Academic Certificate Requirements

To earn the KS academic certificate you must pass all four courses with a C+ (2.3 Quality Point Rating (QPR)) or better in each course and an overall QPR of 3.0 or better. Students earning grades below these standards will need to retake the courses to bring their grades within standards or they will be withdrawn from the program.

Program Sponsors/Advisors

Naval Network Warfare Command (NETWARCOM), Navy Information Operations Command (NIOC), Naval Education and Training Command (NETC)

Required Courses

The curriculum consists of two core courses and two electives.

Core Courses:

IS3210

 

Issues in Defense Knowledge & Information Management

IS4210

 

Knowledge Superiority*

Elective Courses:

CC3000

 

Command Control Communication Computer and Intelligence Systems in DoD

CS3606

 

An Introduction to Information System Security

IO3100

 

Information Operations

IS3200

 

Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design

IS3201

 

Enterprise Database Management Systems

IS3301

 

Computer-Based Tools for Decision Support

IS3302

 

Database Management for Decision Support

IS3502

 

Network Operations I

IS4201

 

Enterprise Database Management

IS4301

 

Data Warehousing, Mining & Visualization

SS3011

 

Space Technology and Applications

Information Systems and Operations - Curriculum 356

This curriculum is closed to new admissions. Previous catalog descriptions of this curriculum are found in the Past Edition Archives at this link: http://www.nps.edu/Academics/Admissions/Registrar/AcademicCatalog

Program Officer

Jim Robinette, CDR, USN

Glasgow West, Room 2012

(831) 656-2433, DSN 756-2433

wjrbine@nps.edu

Joint Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) Systems - Curriculum 365

Program Officer

Jim Robinette, CDR, USN

Glasgow West, Room 2012

(831) 656-2433, DSN 756-2433

wjrobine@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steven J. Iatrou

Glasgow West, Room 3011

(831) 656-3770, DSN 756-3770

FAX (831) 656-3679

sjiatrou@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Joint C4I curriculum is designed to meet broad educational objectives endorsed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The overall objective is to provide officers and DoD civilian equivalents, through graduate education, with a comprehensive operational and technical understanding of the field of C4I systems as applied to joint and combined military operations at the national and unified command levels. The program is designed with the following goals: enable individuals to develop an understanding of the role C4I systems play in the use of military power and the ability to interpret the impact of C4I on operating philosophy; provide adequate background knowledge in basic technology, human capabilities, and joint military operations and how these factors are exploited in current C4I systems; and provide the framework whereby students can perform requirement and planning studies of new C4I systems and contribute to crisis management. This curriculum is sponsored by the Headquarters USMC, Director of Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (C4).

These officers should be able to undertake a wide range of assignments in C4I (both joint and intra-service) over the full span of their careers.

Requirements for Entry

The Joint C4I curriculum is open to all U.S. military services and selected civilian employees of the U.S. Government. Admission requires a baccalaureate degree with above-average grades and mathematics through differential and integral calculus. Eligibility for a TOP SECRET security clearance with access to SPECIAL COMPARTMENTED INFORMATION (SCI) is required. An academic profile code (APC) of 334 is required for direct entry. Officers not meeting the APC may be admitted based on transcript reviews by the Director of Admissions and the Program Officer.

Entry Date

Joint C4I Systems is an eight-quarter course of study with a single entry date in June. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Systems Technology (Joint Command, Control, and Communications (C3)) degree are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curricular program.

Master of Science in Systems Technology (Command, Control, and Communications)

The Master of Science in Systems Technology (Joint C3) degree will be awarded at the completion of the appropriate interdisciplinary program carried out in accordance with the following degree requirements:

Subspecialty

None.

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

IS3001

(3-0)

Information Sciences for Defense

IS3200

(3-2)

Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calc

PH1322

(4-2)

Electromagnetism

Quarter 2

CC3000

(4-0)

Intro to Command and Control

IW3101

(4-0)

Military Ops in the Information Environment

MO1903

(3-0)

Math for ISSO Space Systems Operations

PH2514

(4-0)

Intro to the Space Environment

Quarter 3

EO3516

(4-0)

Intro to Comm Systems Engineering

SE3201

(4-2)

Enterprise Database Management Systems

IS3502

(4-2)

Network Operations I

OS3105

(4-1)

Stats for Technical Management

Quarter 4

EO4516

(4-0)

Enterprise Architecture

IS3301

(3-2)

Computer-Based Tools for Decision Support

IS4505

(3-2)

Wireless Networking

PH3052

(4-0)

Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems

Quarter 5

CC4250

(4-0)

Enterprise Architecture

CS3600

(4-2)

Intro to Computer Security

IS3460

(4-0)

Networked Autonomous and Unmanned Vehicles

SS3011

(3-0)

Space Technology and Applications

Quarter 6

IS3450

(2-0)

RF and WE Concepts and Networked Systems

IS4926

(4-0)

Network Operating Centers

CC0810

(0-4)

Thesis Research for C4I Students

SS3613

(3-0)

Military Satellite Comms

Quarter 7

CC4913

(4-0)

Policies and Problems in Joint C4I

CC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for C4I Students

IS4300

(3-2)

Project Management for Enterprise Systems

MW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and War

Quarter 8

MN3331

(3-1)

Principals of Acquisition Program Management

CC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for C4I Students

MN4125

(4-0)

Managing Planned Change in Complex Organizations

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Joint Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) Systems Curriculum - 365

The graduate shall be able to:

1. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND BUSINESS PRACTICES (Knowledge and Comprehension)

Graduates will be able to identify and describe concepts, information technologies and business practices associated with the acquisition, processing, filtering, transmission, cataloging, storage, security, distribution and display of information needed to support military decision making and control of forces.

2. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION AND MILITARY OPERATIONS (Application and Analysis)

Graduates will to able to relate existing information theories and information systems technologies to current and emerging military problem sets including threats to information movement in the EM spectrum. Graduates will be able to compare competing approaches to these problem sets and be able to apply design, development, testing and evaluation practices that enable solutions. Graduates will be able to evaluate options reflecting viability and alignment to adjacent and higher level system architectures.

3. STRATEGY AND POLICY (Evaluate and Create)

Graduates will be able to evaluate and critique existing policies, procedures and doctrine affecting command and control of forces and the management of information systems in support of military operations. Graduates will be able to clearly articulate alternatives to overcome identified shortcomings. Graduates will support these proposals by identifying their impact throughout the spectrum of military operations.

4. PROBLEM SOLVING AND REAL WORLD APPLICABILITY (Apply, Analyze, Synthesize, Evaluate)

Students will demonstrate their ability to incorporate concepts learned in each of the aforementioned skill requirements by conducting independent research resulting in an approved master’s thesis.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

HQMC C4 March 2013.

Information Systems and Technology - Curriculum 370

Program Officer

Jim Robinette, CDR, USN

Glasgow West, Room 2012

(831) 656-2433, DSN 756-2433

wjrobine@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Glenn R. Cook

Glasgow West, Room 3012

(831) 656-2778, DSN 756-2778

FAX (831) 656-3679

grcook@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Information Systems Technology curriculum is part of the larger Information Sciences, Systems, and Operations (ISSO) discipline. The ISSO curricula consist of the Professional Practice Core and seven degree tracks: Computer Sciences; Joint C4I Systems; Information Systems and Technology; Information Warfare; Intelligence Information Management; Modeling, Virtual Environments, and Simulation; and Space Systems Operations. The Professional Practice Core consists of material in Information Sciences and Technology; Command and Control; C4ISR Systems; Acquisition; C4ISR System Evaluation; Information Operations/Warfare; and Enterprise Policy, Strategy, and Change.

This curriculum provides officers with knowledge of information systems technology to include computer and telecommunications systems, software engineering, networked and distributed applications, database management systems, and decision support systems in the military services. Students will also gain proficiency in information systems, economics, and management necessary for the critical management decisions needed in the development and utilization of complex and evolving computer-based military systems.

Information Systems Technology is an interdisciplinary, graduate-level, master's program integrating mathematics, accounting, economics, statistics, computer science, information systems, communications engineering, networks, and management disciplines. This curriculum is sponsored by the Headquarters USMC, Director of Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (C4).

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent, with above-average grades in mathematics (including differential and integral calculus) resulting in an academic profile code (APC) of at least 325 is required for direct entry. Students lacking these quantitative prerequisites may be acceptable for the program, through a twelve-week refresher, providing their undergraduate records and/or other indicators of success, such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), indicate a capability for graduate-level work. While previous computer, communications, or information systems experience is certainly helpful, it is not essential. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Date

Information Systems Technology is an eight-quarter course of study with a single entry date in September. Those requiring the twelve-week refresher will begin study prior to those entry dates. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Information Technology Management degree are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements established by the curricular program's sponsor.

Master of Science in Information Technology Management

The Master of Science in Information Technology Management degree will be awarded at the completion of the appropriate interdisciplinary program in Curriculum 370. The Master of Science in Information Technology Management requires:

Required Courses

The following courses are required for the 370 program.

CC3000

(4-0)

Introduction to Command and Control

CC4250

(4-0)

Enterprise Architecture

CS3600

(4-2)

Introduction to Computer Security

EO3502

(4-0)

Telecommunications Systems Technology

IS3001

(3-0)

Information Sciences for Defense

IS3200

(3-2)

Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design

IS3201

(4-2)

Enterprise Database Management Systems

IS3202

(3-2)

Thin-Client Database Systems Development

IS3301

(3-2)

Computer based tools for Decision Support

IS3330

(3-0)

Research Methods

IS3333

(2-0)

Introduction to Thesis Research

IS3460

(4-0)

Networked Autonomous and Unmanned Systems

IS3502

(3-2)

Network Operations I

IS4031

(4-0)

Economic Evaluation for Enterprise Technology Investments

IS4182

(4-0)

Enterprise Information Systems Strategy and Policy

IS4220

(3-2)

Technology Enabled Process Improvement

IS4300

(3-2)

Project Management for Enterprise Systems

IS4520

(4-0)

Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World

IW3101

(4-0)

Military Operations in the Information Environment

MA1010

(3-0)

Algebra and Trigonometry (as required)

MN3154

(3-0)

Financial Management in the Armed Forces

MN3331

(5-1)

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management

MN4125

(4-0)

Managing Change in Complex Organizations

MO1901

(3-0)

Mathematics for ISSO

NW3230

(4-0)

Strategy and War (NWC)

OS3105

(4-1)

Statistical Analysis for Management I

SS3011

(3-0)

Space Technology and Applications

SS3613

(3-0)

Military Satellite Communications

Each student in the Information Systems and Technology Curriculum will choose a specialization track no later than the start of the third quarter of study. Current track specializations offered by the Information Sciences Department are:

Network Management Track

Prerequisites

IS3502

Network Operations I

Network Track Courses (Choose 3)

CS3690

Network Security (w/su)

IS4926

Network Operations Centers (w)

IS4505

Wireless Networks (sp)

Computer and Information Security Track

CC4250

Enterprise Architecture

Track Courses (Choose 3)

CS3670

Information Assurance: Secure Management of Systems (f/sp)

CS3695

Internet Security Resources and Policy (Hacking) (f/sp/su)

CS3690

Network Security (w/s)

CS4677

Computer Forensics (f/sp)

Information Operations/Information Warfare Track

(Classified: U.S. Only)

Prerequisite

IW3101

Principles of Information Operations

Track Courses (Choose 3)

IO4300

IO Planning and Execution (su)

IW3921

Non-Kinetic Targeting (sp)

IW4500

IW Systems Engineering (w)

USN Space Cadre

Prerequisite (Already in Matrix)

SS3011

Space Technology and Applications (su/f)

SS3613

Military satellite Communications (su/f)

Track Courses

PH2514

Intro to Space Environment (f/w)

PH3052

Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems (f/sp)

Acquisition Track

Prerequisite (Already in Matrix)

MN3331

Fundamentals of Acquisition

Track Courses (Choose 3)

MN3307

Entrepreneurship in Strategic Purchasing (su)

MN3309

Acquisition of Embedded Weapons System Software (w/s)

MN3318

Acquisition and Quality Management (f/sp)

SE4011

Systems Engineering for Acquisition Managers (sp)

Cyber Systems Track

(Classified: U.S. Only)

Prerequisite (Already in Matrix)

CS3600

Information Assurance: Introduction to Computer Security

IS3502

Network Operations I

Track Courses

CY3110

Internet Protocols (f/sp)

CY3520

Practical Network Operations (w/su)

CY4700

Cyber Wargames: Blue Force Operations (f/sp)

CY4710

Cyber Wargames: Red Force Operations (f/sp)

There may be other available courses based upon clearance (TS/SCI) and experience.

Students with a strong educational or experience background in information systems or computer science may be eligible to validate certain requirements. Students who have validated certain courses will be required to substitute additional courses into their educational plan. These courses may include additional courses of study within their specialization track or other courses offered within the Information Sciences Department or other related fields of study. The Academic Associate and the Program Officer must approve all changes to the matrix.

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Information Systems Technology - Curriculum 370

Engineering, Management and Problem Solving: The Information Systems and Technology graduate shall have the knowledge, skills, and competencies to engineer information systems afloat and ashore; manage information systems, centers, and commands afloat and ashore; and solve information systems engineering and management problems individually and in teams. These general Educational Skill Requirements are supported by the following topical Educational Skill Requirements.

  1. Space, Information Warfare and Command and Control Professional Practices: The officer shall possess skills in the ISSO core subject areas of Science and Technology (Information Technology, Communications, Space, and Sensors), Analysis and Evaluation (Statistics, Operations Analysis, and System Evaluation), Operations Information Management and Systems (C2, C4ISR, Information Operations, and Acquisition Management).
  2. Software Development: The officer must have a thorough knowledge of modern software development to include: an understanding of the software development process; the ability to plan and implement a major programming project and develop the appropriate documentation; the ability to utilize object-oriented techniques in system design; and the ability to use modern software development tools in the construction of modeling, virtual environment, and simulation systems.
  3. Information Systems Technology: The officer must have a thorough knowledge of information systems technology to include: computer system components, computer networks, computer and network security, communication systems and networks, software engineering, database management systems, decision support and expert systems.
  4. Information Systems Analysis and Management: The officer must master the following concepts to effectively manage information system assets: managerial concepts, evaluation of information systems, systems analysis and design, management of information systems, adapting to technological, organizational, and economic changes.
  5. Military Applications: The officer must be able to combine analytical methods and technical expertise with operational experience for effective military applications to include: DoD decision-making process on information systems, information technology acquisition management, DoD computer and telecommunications, C4ISR, C2W, and military use of commercial telecommunications systems.
  6. Independent Research: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research analysis, and proficiency in communicating the results in writing and orally by means of a thesis and a command-oriented briefing. The research in information technology and its management will include problem formulation, decision criteria specification, decision modeling, data collection and experimentation, analysis, and evaluation.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

HQMC C4. Mar 2013.

Doctor of Philosophy in Information Sciences - Curriculum 474

Program Manager

Dan C. Boger, Ph.D.

Glasgow West, Room 3005

(831) 656-3671, DSN 756-3671

FAX (831) 656-3679

dboger@nps.edu

Academic Associates

Thomas Housel, Ph.D.

Root Hall, Room 239

(831) 656-7657, DSN 756-7657

FAX (831) 656-3679

tjhousel@nps.edu

Alex Bordetsky, Ph.D.

Root Hall, Room 225

(831) 656-2287, DSN 756-2287

FAX (831) 656-3679

abordets@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Department of Information Sciences at the Naval Postgraduate School will award the Doctor of Philosophy in Information Sciences degree as a result of meritorious and scholarly achievement in a particular field of information sciences (IS). This program includes course work, scholarly socialization, written and oral examinations, research, and a written dissertation. A candidate must exhibit scholarly application to the entire course of study, achieve a high level of scientific advancement, and establish ability for original investigation leading to the advancement of fundamental knowledge.

IS broadly encompasses the design, implementation, use, promotion and evaluation of organizations, processes and systems associated with knowledge, information, data and communication. It includes areas of concentration in information systems, information technology, information warfare, information operations, and command and control.

The study of IS is multidisciplinary, and no single theory or perspective dominates the field. In general, the field can be divided into technical and behavioral approaches. The technical approach to IS emphasizes mathematically based, normative models to study capabilities of systems and processes, in addition to emphasis on the technological artifacts that enable and support organizations, processes and systems associated with knowledge, information, data and communication. The behavioral approach to IS emphasizes behavioral problems associated with design, implementation, use, promotion and evaluation of organizations, processes and systems associated with knowledge, information, data and communication. A great part of IS research involves integrating these two, complementary approaches.

The Ph.D. in Information Sciences prepares scholars to conduct original research that contributes new knowledge in the domain of information systems, information technology, information warfare, information operations, or command and control. With such ability to conduct original research and contribute new knowledge, the IS Ph.D. helps to prepare scholars also to teach effectively.

Requirements for Entry

U.S. military officers, foreign military officers, U.S. Government civilians, and employees of foreign governments may apply. Applications should begin with the Office of Admissions (see www.nps.edu/admissions/index.html). In addition to a completed application form, the complete application should include: an application letter describing your general background, your interests and experience in research, and your career goals; Official or Certified copies of all academic transcripts; results of a GRE general examination taken within the past five years; and letters from three references relating to your suitability to pursue a doctoral degree. These materials should be sent directly to the Admissions Office. Foreign students who are not native speakers of English must provide scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) examination.

An applicant should have a master's degree in any Information Sciences Department program or in a closely related field from another NPS school or civilian institution. Generally, an acceptable Ph.D. applicant must have above-average grades (GPA > 3.5) in a typical master's degree program. The Ph.D. Committee will also take other evidence of research or academic ability into account in making a recommendation as to whether to admit an applicant. Final acceptance will be based on the professional discretion of the Chairman, Ph.D. Committee.

Entry Date

The Ph.D. Program Committee will evaluate each applicant to gauge the minimum amount of time the applicant will need to complete the program (normal time is three years of full-time study). The Information Sciences Department may impose the condition that the applicant obtain authorization for at least four years to complete the Ph.D. Admitted Ph.D. students may begin in any quarter.

Program of Study

Each student's Doctoral Committee will guide the student in designing a program suitable for his/her special interests and background, alert them to opportunities both within the Department of Information Sciences and other departments at NPS, and monitor the student's progress.

The doctoral program is based on a core of courses designed to provide the student with the broad knowledge, analytic skills, and proficiency in research methods necessary for advanced course work and dissertation research. Additional course work in application areas may be required and is based on the discretion of the student's primary advisor.

Core Courses

IS4700

(4-0)

Introduction to the Philosophy of Sciences

IS4710

(3-2)

Qualitative Methods for Research

IS4720

(3-2)

Quantitative Methods for Research

IS4730

(3-2)

Design of Experiments for Research

IS4790

(0-3)

Topical I

Students who have taken the equivalent of these courses may waive one or more of these core requirements by the Departmental Ph.D. Committee.

Sample Ph.D. Program in Information Sciences

First Year: Complete the core program course and residency requirements for the Ph.D. program. Complete additional course work in accordance with the student's specific program requirements. Have a faculty advisor for course work appointed.

A diagnostic review will be conducted following the first year of study. The review will consider indicators of scholastic achievement, including performance in master's- and Ph.D.-level courses, as well as other indicators deemed appropriate by the examining faculty. The review culminates in a formal report to the Chairman of the Departmental Ph.D. Committee; includes a recommendation as to whether or not the student should continue in the program; and, if so, makes recommendations regarding how the student can improve his or her performance. A professor from the student's chosen academic unit then discusses the report with the individual, making a careful assessment of demonstrated strengths and weaknesses in order to help the student to progress more effectively.

Second Year: Finish course requirements, and prepare for the Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations. Take Qualifying Examinations, in residence, near the middle of the second year. Upon successful completion of both examinations, the student will establish a Dissertation Committee, defend a dissertation proposal, and then advance to candidacy. Students who fail either of the qualifying examinations can petition the Departmental Ph.D. Committee Chair for one additional attempt at passing it.

Third Year: Concentrate primarily on dissertation research, with perhaps a course or two related to the dissertation.

The dissertation culminates the student's academic endeavors. Working closely with faculty members from his or her committee during all phases of research, the student is expected to complete a dissertation of substantial magnitude, and to make a significant contribution to the advancement of knowledge in the Information Sciences field. It should be of sufficient originality and quality to merit publication, either in whole or in part, in a scholarly journal.

The dissertation is defended, in residence, at a final oral examination. It must be completed and accepted within five years of advancement to candidacy. The dissertation defense is held before an examination committee, and is open to the public. The defense will normally consist of a one-hour public segment and a one-hour private segment, but should, in no case, exceed two hours in length.

The pursuit of the Ph.D. is both challenging and rewarding. A Ph.D. is not a more in-depth version of the Master's Degree. It requires high-level, integrative, critical thinking; extended, independent research; self-motivated effort; and a commitment to expand one's perspective of the world. It is difficult to assess one's likelihood of success based on previous academic or professional performance. Applicants should be aware that admission to the program does not guarantee completion. It is anticipated that a number of candidates will not be allowed to continue after the diagnostic review (approximately one year), and that a number of candidates will self-select out of the program throughout its various stages. Applicants should seriously consider the effort that will be required for successful completion prior to applying.

Network Operations and Technology - Curriculum 386

Program Officer

Jim Robinette, CDR, USN

Glasgow West, Room 2012

(831) 656-2433, DSN 756-2433

wjrobine@nps.edu

Academic Associates

Glen R. Cook

Glasgow West, Room 3012

(831) 656-2778, DSN 756-2778

FAX (831) 656-3679

grcook@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Network Operations and Technology (NWOT) is an interdisciplinary, graduate-level, master's program integrating the study of military operations, decision making, information networks and systems, and information sciences.

The NWOT program is designed to provide the broad base of knowledge needed to assist in fighting and winning America’s wars in today’s networked environment. The curriculum consists of a professional practice core of courses and specialization tracks of study in Information Domain Operations and Information Systems Management. The academic core consists of web services, network operations, enterprise strategies and policy, and managing process change. The specialization tracks are designed to provide students and opportunity to explore specific areas of interest to the Navy.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree or the equivalent resulting in an academic profile code (APC) of at least 344 is required for direct acceptance into the program. Students not meeting the minimum APC may be considered for admission following review of their past academic performance.

Entry Date

Network Operations and Technology is a six-quarter course of study with an entry date in September of each year.

Degree

The Master of Science in Network Operations degree will be awarded after successful completion of an approved matrix of courses and research under the following guidelines:

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies a Navy officer for the 6209P (proposed) subspecialty.

Core Course of Study

The following courses are core to the NWOT degree and are required for all tracks:

CS3690

4-1

Network Security

CC4250

4-0

Enterprise Architecture

IS3001

3-0

Information Sciences for Defense

IS3201

4-2

Enterprise Database Management Systems

IS3301

3-2

Computer Based Tools for Decision Support

IS3330

3-0

Research Methods for Information Sciences

IS3502

4-2

Network Operations I

IS4182

4-0

Enterprise Information Systems and Policy

IS4220

3-2

Technology Enabled Process Improvement

IS4410

4-0

Policies and Problems in Information Dominance

IS4505

3-2

Wireless Networking

IS4926

4-0

Network Operating Centers

NW3230

4-2

Strategy and War (naval personnel only)

NW3275

4-0

Joint maritime Ops I

NW3276

4-0

Joint Ops II

NW3285

4-0

Theatre Sec Decision Making

IS0810

0-8

Thesis Research (taken three times)

In addition to the core courses students must complete one of two approved curriculum tracks consisting of the following courses (or their equivalent) as appropriate for each track:

Information Domain Ops (IDO):

SS3011

4-0

Space Technology and Applications

IS3210

4-0

Information and Knowledge Management Issues in Defense

IS3450

2-0

RF and EW Theory and Applications

IS3460

3-0

Autonomous Vehicles and Industrial Control Systems

SXXXX

 

Curric Elective

Information Systems Management (ISM):

CC4250

4-0

Enterprise Architecture

CS3030

4-0

Computer Architecture and Operating Systems

IS3200

3-2

Enterprise Systems Analysis and Design

IS3202

4-2

Thin Client Database Systems Development

IS4031

4-0

Economic Evaluation for Enterprise Technology Investments

3-2

Project Management of Enterprise Systems

MN3331

5-1

Principles of Acquisition and Program Management

MN3154

3-0

Financial Management in the Armed Forces

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Network Operations and Technology - Curriculum 386
Subspecialty Code: 6209P - (Proposed)

  1. Graduates will be able to identify and describe theories and concepts associated with data, information, information systems and networks (human and technological). They will demonstrate the ability to apply theories and technology associated with the physical information and cognitive domains to enhance and improve military operations and decision-making processes. Graduates will possess domain specific knowledge in Network Operations and the theories and technologies that enable networked military operations.
  2. Common Core: The following knowledge areas will be common to all officers earning the 6209 subspecialty code:
  3. To this end, graduates will possess the skills to be able to:
  4. Specialized Tracks: Each graduate will complete courses related to one of two specialized areas of interest to Network Operations and Technology: Information Dominance Operations and Information Systems Management.

To this end, graduates will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Identify elements of Assured C2 and identify means to achieving Assured C2 throughout the Navy. This includes an understanding of the constituent components (e.g., resources, requirements, capabilities, governance, tactics, techniques and procedures) that must be marshaled and aligned with doctrine, organizational structure, training, material, logistics, personnel and facilities to achieve optimal effect.
  2. Optimize information/C2 systems configurations to align with emergent and anticipated changes in the operational environment to support decision maker needs including satellite and space communications systems, Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT), and space-based sensing capabilities and applications.
  3. Identify alternative C2 configuration plans to cope with natural and human-induced changes in communication channel capacity and the information environment in general. These changes include but are not limited to anti-access/area denial situations, emission control and Electromagnetic Maneuver Warfare (EMW) requirements, satellite loss and/or degradation, intruded, degraded or compromised networks (to include – Denied Disconnected, Intermittent and Limited (D-DIL) bandwidth environments), varied terrestrial, celestial and meteorological environments. Config management and network security maintenance.
  4. Ship, shore, airborne, expeditionary, National net-enabled capabilities (to include DoD Information Networks (DODIN)), Radio Frequency (RF) theory, and electromagnetic spectrum usage and protection.
  5. Emerging Information Technology capabilities to include a survey of advanced sensing, computer vision, robotics, autonomous systems, industrial and control systems networks, and machine learning.

To this end, graduates will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Plan and manage an information technology project/program including required planning, programming and budgeting actions. Understand how to exploit technology advantages in a network-centric environment to achieve operational objectives.
  2. Effectively manage information system assets through a thorough understanding of managerial concepts, evaluation techniques, systems analysis and design, which involves adapting to technological, organizational, and economic changes, and military use of commercial telecommunications systems.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance/Director of Naval Intelligence OPNAV (N2/N6). November 2013.

Master of Science in Remote Sensing Intelligence - Curriculum 475

Program Manager

Richard Christopher Olsen, Ph.D.

Code PH, Spanagel Hall, Room 103

(831) 656-2019, DSN 756-2019

FAX (831) 656-2834

olsen@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Master of Science in Remote Sensing Intelligence curriculum focuses on improving the technical skills of the intelligence image analyst, allowing them to address more sophisticated problems and make use of the newest available technology. The student will develop a deeper understanding of how imagery is acquired, processed, and exploited as part of the intelligence cycle. The degree program requires a research thesis which explores, evaluates or develops new or significant contributions to the Remote Sensing field. Curriculum focus is on foundation technical skills, different Remote Sensing technologies currently available for imagery, processing techniques, and intelligence applications.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree or the equivalent resulting in an academic profile code (APC) of at least 234 is required for acceptance into the program. TOP SECRET security clearance with access to SPECIAL COMPARTMENTED INFORMATION (SCI) is also required (eligibility only required to apply and be accepted to the program. However, it must be cleared and granted prior to beginning coursework). Additional specific pre-requisite classes are college level Linear Algebra (equivalent to MA2043) and a college level Basic Physics sequence (calculus level not required); and a basic course in computer programming.

Entry Dates

The MS-RSI is a four quarter course of study with a start date at the beginning of the academic year, October session.

Degree

Master of Science in Remote Sensing Intelligence

The degree of Master of Science in Remote Sensing Intelligence will be awarded at the completion of the appropriate interdisciplinary program in Curriculum 475. The Master of Science in Remote Sensing Intelligence requires:

The MS-RSI students will satisfy these degree requirements using the following approved courses or approved alternates:

SS3011

(3-0)

Space Technology and Applications

SS3001

(3-2)

Military Applications of National Space Systems (TS/SCI)

NS3159

(4-0)

Principles of Joint Operational Intelligence (TS/SCI)

CS4330

(3-2)

Video Imaging and Surveillance (Photogrammetry possible substitution)

OS3180

(4-1)

Probability and Statistics

PH3052

(4-0)

Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems

IS4052

(3-2)

Imaging Spectrometry Theory, Analysis and Applications

IS4053

(3-2)

Spectral and Polarimetric Tools and Analysis Techniques TS/SCI

IS4054

(3-1)

Analysis Techniques for Passive Imaging Systems TS/SCI

IS4055

(3-1)

Analysis Techniques for RADAR Imaging Systems

IS4060

(3-2)

Analysis Techniques for Laser Imaging Systems (LiDAR) Confidential

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

None.

Information Warfare - Curriculum 595

Program Officer

Jim Robinette, CDR, USN

Glasgow West, Room 2012

(831) 656-2433, DSN 756-2433

wjrobine@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steven J. Iatrou

Glasgow West, Room 3011

(831) 656-3770, DSN 756-3770

FAX (831) 656-3679

sjiatrou@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Graduates of this curriculum are thoroughly knowledgeable in Information Operations (IO) and Information Warfare (IW). They receive a Master of Science in Information Warfare Systems Engineering (MSIWSE) degree that provides the services with officers who are well versed in the technical, theoretical, and operational aspects of interdisciplinary IO/IW as they relate to joint mission objectives in modern warfare. This curriculum is sponsored by the Headquarters USMC, Director of Strategy and Plans.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades with courses in science and mathematics (through integral calculus) is required for entry. Additionally, applicants must have a minimum academic profile code (APC) of 324. Eligibility for TOP SECRET security clearance with access to SPECIAL COMPARTMENTED INFORMATION (SCI) is required for U.S. students. Applicants not meeting the mathematics requirements may be considered for entry via a refresher quarter.

Entry Date

The Information Warfare curriculum is an eight-quarter course of study with a single entry date in June. For further information, contact the Program Officer or Academic Associate for this curriculum.

Degree

Requirements for the MSIWSE degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curricular program.

Master of Science in Information Warfare Systems Engineering

The MSIWSE degree will be awarded at the completion of a multidisciplinary program in Curricula 595. The MSIWSE degree program has not been reviewed by the Engineering Accreditation Commission, ABET. The MSIWSE requires:

Course of Study

Quarter 1

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calc

MA1114

(4-0)

Single Variable Calc II

PH1322

(4-2)

Electromagnetism

Quarter 2

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

MA1115

 

Multi-Variable Calculus

IW3101

(4-1)

Introduction to Information Warfare

MA1116

(3-0)

Vector Calculus

Quarter 3

MA3139

(4-0)

Fourier Analysis and Partial Differential Equations

OS3105

(4-1)

Statistics for Technical Management

IS3502

(4-2)

Network Operations I

EO2652

(4-1)

Field, waves, and Electromagnetic Engineering

Quarter 4

CS3030

(4-0)

Fundamentals of Computer Architecture

EO2512

(4-2)

Introduction to Communications and Countermeasures

EO3602

(4-2)

Electromagnetic Radiation, Scattering, and Propagation

IW3921

(3-0)

IO Targeting

Quarter 5

IW4500

(3-2)

Information Warfare Systems Engineering

CS3600

(4-2)

Intro to Computer Security

DA3101

(4-0)

Conflict in the Information Age

Quarter 6

CS3695

(3-2)

Network Vulnerability Assessment and Risk Mitigation

EO4612

(4-2)

Microwave Devices and Radar

IW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for IW Students

IW4960

(3-2)

Advanced Information Warfare Systems

Quarter 7

CS3690

(4-2)

Network Security

EC3760

(3-2)

Information Operations Systems

NW3230

(3-2)

Strategy and War

IW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for IW Students

Quarter 8

IO4300

(3-2)

Planning and Execution of Military Operations in the Information Environment

MN3331

(4-0)

Principals of Acquisition and Program Management

IW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for IW Students

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Information Warfare - Curriculum 595
Sciences, Technology, and Business Processes (Knowledge, Comprehension, and Application):

  1. Identify, describe, and apply concepts, theories, and practices in mathematics; physics; statistics; engineering; systems engineering; systems analysis, design and testing; and operations research that apply to information operations systems and processes.
  2. Describe, explain and apply DoD acquisition regulations and processes as they apply to information operations related systems.

Information Operations (Knowledge, Comprehension and Application):

  1. Identify, describe, explain and apply concepts, theories and practices associated with the employment of information operations assets and methods across the range of military operations.

Information Operations (Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation)

  1. Compare existing strategies, objectives and technologies with emerging concepts in these areas. They will be able to identify and compare the advantages, disadvantages and risks associated with each area. The graduate will be able to defend their assessment in terms of operational advantage, financial risk and technological feasibility. This skill area shall provide for subject-area track options in:
    1. Public Policy
    2. SIGINT/EW
    3. CNO/Cyberspace Operations and
    4. Operations and Planning.

Planning and Execution (Application and Analysis):

  1. Relate existing information operations technologies and theories to current and emerging military problem sets across the range of military operations (ROMO). These theories and technologies include, but are not limited to, those associated with electronic warfare, computer network operations, networks and cyberspace operations, decision making/command and control (C2), psychological operations/military information support operations, deception and influence operations.

Strategy and Policy (Synthesize and Evaluate):

  1. Evaluate and critique existing policies, procedures and doctrine affecting information operations and propose alternatives to overcome identified shortcomings.
  2. Graduates will support these proposals by identifying their impact across the range of military operations (ROMO).

Problem Solving and Real World Applicability (Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation):

  1. Incorporate concepts learned in each of the aforementioned skill requirements by designing, developing and executing a research project resulting in the writing of a comprehensive master’s thesis.

Electronic Warfare Curriculum - 596

Program Officer

Joshua D. Green, Lt Col, USAF

Glasgow Hall, Room 3010

(831) 656-3565, DSN 756-3565

jdgreen@nps.edu

Academic Associate

David C. Jenn, Ph.D.

Code EC/Jn, Spanagel Hall, Room 414

(831) 656-2254, DSN 756-2254

FAX (831) 656-2760

jenn@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This curriculum provides officers that are thoroughly knowledgeable in the technical and operational aspects of the role of electronic warfare as an integral part of modern warfare. The breadth of coverage includes Electronic Attack (EA), Electronic Protection (EP), and Electronic Warfare Support (ES). It is designed to provide an understanding of the principles underlying the broad field of using electronic warfare to control and manipulate the electromagnetic spectrum during military operations.

Requirements for Entry

Candidate students have a minimum academic profile code (APC) of 324 and receive approval by the Director of Admissions at the Naval Postgraduate School. The procedures for application are contained under the Admissions heading in this catalog. International students should refer to the Admissions section for current TOEFL and entrance requirements.

Entry Date

The Electronic Warfare curriculum is an eight-quarter course of study with an entry date in October. If further information is needed, contact the Program Officer or Academic Associate.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Electronic Warfare Systems Engineering (MSEWSE) degree are met en route to satisfying the specified curricular program and complying with the following requirements:

Master of Science in Electronic Warfare Systems Engineering

The MSEWSE degree will be awarded at the completion of a multidisciplinary program in Curricula 596. The MSEWSE degree program has not been reviewed by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. The Master of Science in Electronic Warfare Systems Engineering degree requires:

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

PH1322

(4-2)

Electromagnetism

IT1500

(4-0)

Informational Program Seminar for International Officers

MA1115

(4-0)

Multi Variable Calculus

Quarter 2

OS3104

(4-0)

Statistics for Science and Engineering

MA3139

(4-0)

Fourier Analysis and
Partial Differential Equations

EO2652

(4-1)

Fields, Waves, and
Electromagnetic Engineering

EO2102

(4-2)

Basic Electronics and
Electrical Machines

Quarter 3

OS3003

(4-0)

Operations Research for Information Operations

EO3602

(4-2)

Electromagnetic Radiation, Scattering, and Propagation

CS2971

(4-2)

Fundamental Object-Oriented Programming in C++

EO2512

(4-2)

Telecommunications Engineering

Quarter 4

EO4612

(4-2)

Microwave Devices and Radar

CS3030

(4-0)

Computer Architecture and Operating Systems

IW3502

(4-2)

Information Warfare Networks

EO3512

(4-1)

Communications and Countermeasures

Quarter 5

CS3600

(4-2)

Introduction to Computer Security

PH3204

(4-2)

Electro-Optic Principles and Devices

EC3700

(3-2)

Joint Network-Enabled Electronic Warfare

EO4911

(2-0)

Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies in Electrical and
Computer Engineering

Quarter 6

PH4209

(3-2)

EO/IR Systems and Countermeasures

MR3419

(2-1)

Assessment of Atmospheric Factors in EM/EO Propagation

IW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for IW Students

OA4603

(4-0)

Test and Evaluation

Quarter 7

 

(4-0)

Approved Elective

EC4010

(3-2)

Principles of System Engineering

EC4690

(3-2)

Joint Network-Enabled Electronic Warfare II

IW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for IW Students

Quarter 8

 

(4-0)

Approved Elective

 

(4-0)

Approved Elective

IW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for IW Students

IW0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for IW Students

Department of Operations Research

Chairman

Robert F. Dell, Ph.D.

Code OR/DE, Glasgow Hall, Room 239

(831) 656-2853, DSN 756-2853

FAX (831) 656-2595

dell@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Research

Johannes O. Royset, Ph.D.

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 212

(831) 656-2578, DSN 756-2578

FAX (831) 656-2595

joroyset@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Operations

Kevin J. Maher

Code OR/Mk, Glasgow Hall, Room 227

(831) 656-2691, DSN 756-2691

FAX (831) 656-2595

KJMaher@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Instruction

Kyle Lin, Ph.D.

Code OR/Lk, Glasgow Hall, Room 260

(831) 656-2648, DSN 756-2648

FAX (831) 656-2595

kylin@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Curricula Coordination

James N. Eagle, Ph.D.

Code OR/Er, Glasgow Hall, Room 277

(831) 656-2654, DSN 756-2654

FAX (831) 656-2595

jeagle@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Distributed Programs

Steven E. Pilnick, Ph.D.

Code OR/Ps, Glasgow Hall, Room 291

(831) 656-2283, DSN 756-2283

FAX (831) 656-2595

spilnick@nps.edu

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

David L. Alderson, Associate Professor (2006); Ph.D., Stanford University, 2003.

Jon Alt, LTC, USA, Military Assistant Professor (2013); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2012.

Jeffrey Appleget, Senior Lecturer (2009); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1999.

Michael Atkinson, Assistant Professor (2009); Ph.D., Stanford University, 2009.

Andrew H. Bellenkes, Senior Lecturer (2010); Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1999.

Gerald G. Brown, Distinguished Professor (1973); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1974.

Samuel E. Buttrey, Associate Professor (1996); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1996.

W. Matthew Carlyle, Professor (2002); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1997.

Emily Craparo, Research Assistant Professor (2010); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2008.

Robert F. Dell, Chairman, Department of Operations Research and Professor (1990); Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo, 1990.

Ned Dimitrov, Assistant Professor (2010); Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2008.

James N. Eagle, Professor (1982); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1975.

Nelson Emmons, COL, USA, Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences and Military Associate Professor (2013); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1997.

Paul Lee Ewing, Research Associate Professor (2005); Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines, 2002.

Ronald D. Fricker, Jr., Professor (2005); Ph.D., Yale University, 1997.

Thomas E. Halwachs, Senior Lecturer (1988); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1976.

Thomas A. Hamrick, Lecturer (2006); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1997.

Thomas H. Hoivik, Senior Lecturer (1983); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1973.

Jeff Hyink, CDR, USN, Military Assistant Professor (2012); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2007.

Patricia A. Jacobs, Distinguished Professor (1978); Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1973.

Rachel Silvestrini, Assistant Professor (2009); Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2008.

Quinn Kennedy, Senior Lecturer (2007); Ph.D., Stanford, 2002.

Jeffrey E. Kline, Professor of Practice (2005); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1991.

Robert A. Koyak, Associate Professor (1998); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1985.

Moshe Kress, Professor (2003); Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1981.

Kyle Y. Lin, Associate Professor (2004); University of California at Berkeley, 2000.

Keith Littrell, LCDR, USN, Military Assistant Professor (2013); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2010.

Thomas W. Lucas, Professor (1998); Ph.D., University of California at Riverside, 1991.

Kevin J. Maher, Lecturer (1997); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1993.

Michael E. McCauley, Research Professor (2002); Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 1979.

Deidre McClay, CAPT, USN, Chair of Warfare Innovation and Military Associate Professor, 2012.

Gregory K. Mislick, Lecturer (2005); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1988.

Scott Nestler, COL, USA, Assistant Professor (2010); Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2007.

Daniel A. Nussbaum, Visiting Professor (2004); Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1971.

Douglas E. Otte, Senior Lecturer (2007); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1989.

Steven E. Pilnick, Senior Lecturer (1999); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1989.

Johannes O. Royset, Associate Professor (2003); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 2002.

Anton Rowe, Research Associate (1999); M.S., Stanford University, 1997.

Javier Salmeron, Associate Professor (2000); Ph.D., Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 1998.

Paul J. Sanchez, Senior Lecturer (1999); Ph.D., Cornell University, 1986.

Susan M. Sanchez, Professor (2000); Ph.D., Cornell University, 1986.

Lee Sciarini, LT, USN, Assistant Professor (2013); Ph.D., University of Central Florida, 2009.

Chad Seagren, MAJ, USMC, Assistant Professor (2010); Ph.D., George Mason University, 2010.

Lawrence G. Shattuck, Senior Lecturer (2005); Ph.D., The Ohio State University, 1995.

Nita Lewis Shattuck, Associate Professor (2000); Ph.D., University of Texas, 1982.

Dashi Singham, Research Assistant Professor (2010); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 2010.

Christian Smith, Senior Lecturer (2009); Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1996.

Roberto Szechtman, Associate Professor (2003); Ph.D., Stanford University, 2001.

Lyn R. Whitaker, Associate Professor (1988); Ph.D., University of California at Davis, 1985.

R. Kevin Wood, Distinguished Professor (1982); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1982.

Emeritus Professors

Gordon H. Bradley, Professor Emeritus (1973); Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1967.

Donald P. Gaver, Jr., Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., Princeton University, 1956.

Wayne P. Hughes, Jr., Professor of Practice (1979); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1964.

Peter Purdue, Professor Emeritus (1986); Ph.D., Purdue University, 1972.

Robert R. Read, Professor Emeritus (1971); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1958.

David A. Schrady, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1965); Ph.D., Case Institute of Technology, 1965.

Michael G. Sovereign, Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., Purdue University, 1965.

Alan R. Washburn, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1965.

Brief Overview

Operations Research (OR) originated during World War II as a response to tactical problems relating to the effective and efficient operation of weapon systems, and to operational problems relating to the deployment and employment of military forces. Since then, OR has evolved into a full-scale, scientific discipline that is practiced widely by analysts in industry, government, and the military.

OR is the science of helping people and organizations make better decisions. More formally, it is the development and application of mathematical models, statistical analyses, simulations, analytical reasoning, and common sense to the understanding and improvement of real-world operations. Improvement can be measured by the minimization of cost, maximization of efficiency, or optimization of other relevant measures of effectiveness.

The military uses OR at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels. OR improves decision making and facilitates insights into the phenomena of combat. OR applications cover the gamut of military activities including: national policy analysis, resource allocation, force composition and modernization, logistics, human resources (recruiting, retention, promotion, training, and personnel assignment), battle planning, flight operations scheduling, intelligence, command and control, weapon selection (weapon system effectiveness, cost, compatibility, and operability), engagement tactics (fire control, maneuver, target selection, and battle damage assessment), maintenance and replenishment, and search and rescue.

The Naval Postgraduate School's Operations Research Department offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. In 2001, it celebrated the 50th anniversary of its curriculum, which was the first educational program in OR in the United States. It is one of the oldest, largest, and highest-ranking OR departments in the country. It is without peer in terms of the extent to which graduate education is integrated with a commitment to solving real military problems. Our students and faculty use the latest mathematical modeling ideas and computing technology to penetrate deeply into the analysis of important real-world problems. Analysis is a key word; NPS operations researchers frequently influence decisions and serve as agents for change.

For further information, see the OR Department Website: www.nps.edu/Academics/GSOIS.

Degree

Master of Science in Applied Science

Master of Science in Operations Research

Doctor of Philosophy in Operations Research

Master of Science in Human Systems Integration

Master of Systems Analysis

Master of Cost Estimation and Analysis

Certificates

Human Systems Integration Certificate

Systems Analysis Certificate

Operations Research Course Descriptions

OA Refresher Courses

OAR100 Introduction to Computational Methods for Operations Research (2-2) As Required

(No credit) (Meets first 6 weeks of quarter.) Introduction to the Naval Postgraduate School computer laboratories and software. Windows operating system, files, Internet, editing, word processing, spreadsheets, data analysis, and presentation graphics. Review of selected topics in differential and integral calculus. Integration of functions of a single variable. Constrained and unconstrained optimization of functions of a single variable.

OAR160 Introduction of Operations Analysis II (2-2) As Required

(No credit) This course is the second half of OA1600.

OAR200 Introduction to Visual Basic for Operations Research (2-2) As Required

(No credit) (Meets last 6 weeks of quarter.) A first course in computer programming using Visual Basic as a high-level programming language. Primary emphasis will be on the planning, structuring, and debugging of computer programs for solving Operations Research problems. Prerequisite: None.

<OAR Courses OAR100-OAR200>

OAR100 Introduction to Computational Methods for Operations Research (2-2) As Required

(No Credit) (Meets first six weeks of quarter.) Introduction to the Naval Postgraduate School computer laboratories and software. Windows operating system, files, Internet, editing, word processing, spreadsheets, data analysis, and presentation graphics. Review of selected topics in differential and integral calculus. Integration of functions of a single variable. Constrained and unconstrained optimization of functions of a single variable.

OAR160 Introduction of Operations Analysis II (2-2) As Required

(No Credit) This course is the second half of OA1600.

OAR200 Introduction to Visual Basic for Operations Research (2-2) As Required

(No Credit) (Meets last six weeks of quarter.) A first course in computer programming using Visual Basic as a high-level programming language. Primary emphasis will be on the planning, structuring, and debugging of computer programs for solving operations research problems. Prerequisite: None.

OA Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<OA Courses OA0001-OA3910>

OA0001 Seminar for Operations Analysis Students (0-2) As Required

(No credit) Guest lecturers. Review of experience tours. Thesis and research presentations. Prerequisite: None.

OA0810 Thesis Research for Operations Analysis Students (0-8) Fall/Winter/Summer/Spring

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course. Prerequisite: None.

OA0820 Integrated Project (0-12) As Required

The Naval Postgraduate School provides many opportunities for students to participate in campus-wide interdisciplinary projects. These projects encourage students to conceptualize systems which respond to current and future operational requirements. An integral part of the project involves working with other groups to understand and resolve issues involved with system integration and to lend OR-specific expertise to these projects. This course is available to Operations Research students who are participating in a campus-wide integrated project. Course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: None. Classification: Security Clearance Required.

OA1600 Introduction to Operations Analysis I (2-2) As Required

(No credit) A first course in Operations Analysis, covering its origins in World War II to current practices. Introduces concepts, tools, and methods of analysis, with tactical examples. Emphasis on measuring combat effectiveness and developing better tactics. Prerequisite: None.

OA2801 Computational Methods for Operations Research (4-1) Fall/Spring

An introductory course in computation and procedural programming with an emphasis on the analysis and implementation of algorithms relevant to Operations Research. The course is taught using a general purpose programming language. The laboratory has weekly programming assignments. Prerequisite: None.

OA2900 Workshop in Operations Research/Systems Analysis (V-0) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

This course may be repeated for credit if course content changes. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisites: Department approval and a background in Operations Research.

OA2910 Selected Topics in Operations Analysis (V-4) Winter

(Variable hours 2-0 to 5-0.) Presentation of a wide selection of topics from the current literature. This course may be repeated for credit if course content changes. Prerequisite: A background in Operations Research.

OA3101 Probability (4-1) Fall/Spring

Introduction to data entry, manipulation, and graphing using spreadsheets and statistical packages. Graphical and tabular methods in descriptive statistics, measures of location and variability. Probability axioms, counting techniques, conditional probability. Discrete and continuous probability distributions: binomial, hypergeometric, negative binomial, Poisson, normal, exponential, gamma, and others. Joint probability distributions, conditional distributions and conditional expectation, linear functions. Random samples, probability plots. Prerequisites: Knowledge of single-variable calculus and MA1115 (may be taken concurrently).

OA3102 Statistics (4-2) Winter/Summer

Point estimation, method of moments, maximum likelihood, least squares. Confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses for one- and two-sample problems. Analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, interaction, simple design cases. Goodness of fit and contingency tables, sign tests, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Prerequisites: OA3101 and MA1115 and MA3110 (taken concurrently).

OA3103 Data Analysis (4-1) Fall/Spring

Techniques for analyzing, summarizing, and comparing sets of real data with several variables. Computations are done in a statistical package and a common spreadsheet program. Model building and verification, graphical methods of exploration. Least squares regression, logistic and Poisson regression, introduction to categorical data analysis, principal components and/or classification. Prerequisite: None.

OA3105 Nonparametric Statistics (4-0) Winter

Tests based on the binomial distribution; confidence intervals for percentiles, tolerance intervals and goodness-of-fit tests; contingency tables; one-sample tests, two-sample tests, and tests for independence based on ranks and scores; nonparametric analysis of variance and regression. Applications will illustrate the techniques. Prerequisite: A course in statistical inference.

OA3201 Linear Programming (4-0) Spring

(Same as MA3301) Theory of optimization of linear functions subject to linear constraints. The simplex algorithm, duality, sensitivity analyses, parametric linear programming. Applications to resource allocation, manpower planning, transportation and communications, network models, ship scheduling, etc. Introduction to computer-based linear programming systems. Prerequisite: None.

OA3301 Stochastic Models I (4-0) Fall/Spring

Course objectives are to provide an introduction to stochastic modeling. Topics include the homogeneous Poisson process and its generalizations and discrete and continuous time Markov chains and their applications in modeling random phenomena in civilian and military problems. Prerequisite: OA3101 or consent of the instructor.

OA3302 Simulation Modeling (4-0) Winter/Summer

Discrete event digital simulation methodology. Monte Carlo techniques and use of simulation languages. Variance reduction techniques, design of simulation experiments, and analysis of results. Prerequisite: OA3103, OA3200, OA3301.

OA3304 Decision Theory (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course provides an introduction to modern theory and methods for decision making in both single and multiple person decision-making situations. Bayesian methods are emphasized in the single-person case, including decision trees, Bayesian networks, influence diagrams, and multicriterion decision making. Multiperson situations covered include two-person zero-sum games, voting, Nash bargaining, and the Shapley value. Applications are mainly to military problems. Prerequisite: None.

OA3401 Human Factors in Systems Design (3-1) Fall/Spring

This course will provide an introduction to the field of human factors with an emphasis on military systems. Humans are the most important element of any military system. Consequently, the design of effective systems must take into account human strengths and limitations as well as considerations of human variability. The course surveys human factors and human-centered design and system effectiveness and safety. Topics include human cognition and performance as they are influenced by physiological, anthropometric, and environmental considerations. Prerequisite: None.

OA3402 Research Methods for Performance Assessment (3-1) Winter/Summer

Well-constructed research is invaluable; informing and enabling decision makers to make better choices. This course covers the research process from beginning to end and explores the types of research conducted in a variety of laboratory and field settings. Topics include institutional approval and ethical use of human subjects; research reliability and validity; formulation of the research question; research designs ranging from experimentation to systematic observational techniques and subjective surveys; database management considerations; analytical approaches; and writing and presenting the research paper. Prerequisite: None.

OA3411 Introduction to Human Systems Integration (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course serves as the framework for examining Human Systems Integration in the context of Department of Defense Systems Acquisition as mandated by DoD Instruction 5000.2, Enclosure 7. This course provides an overview of the HSI domains: human factors engineering, personnel, habitability, manpower, training, environment safety and occupational health, and survivability. Principles of individual physiological and psychological capabilities and limitations and team attributes are also introduced. Prerequisites: None.

OA3412 Human Systems Integration in the DoD Acquisition Lifecycle (3-0) Fall

This course further expands on the role of Human Systems Integration within the context of the Department of Defense Systems Engineering Process in the DoD Acquisition Lifecycle. Students examine select acquisition activities (e.g., Joint Capabilities Integration Development System, or JCIDS) and the manner in which HSI practitioners influence these activities. This course also focuses on leveraging the unique activities of HSI practitioners to assist/support program managers and lead systems engineers in developing human-centered systems that optimize total system performance while minimizing cost and risk. Prerequisite: OA3411.

OA3413 Human Systems Integration Tools, Tradeoffs, and Processes (3-1) Winter

This course provides a description and evaluation of tools and techniques available to facilitate the acquisition of human--centered military systems. It also provides an overview of techniques employed by practitioners within the sub-disciplines of HSI. The focus of this course is on tool inputs and outputs and their utility. This course also examines the manner in which HSI trade space analysis is performed — one of the most important roles of the HSI practitioner in the acquisition process. Prerequisite: OA3412.

OA3501 Inventory I (4-0) As Required

A study of deterministic and approximate stochastic inventory models. Deterministic economic lot size models with infinite production rate, constraints, quantity discounts. An approximate lot size-reorder point model with stochastic demand. An approximate stochastic periodic review model. Single period stochastic models. Applications to Navy supply systems. Prerequisite: OA3101 or consent of the instructor.

OA3601 Combat Models and Games (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course provides a discussion of measures of effectiveness and a quantitative introduction to dynamic programming, target coverage models, Kalman filters, Lanchester Systems, and two-person zero-sum games. Prerequisite: MA3110, OA3102.

OA3602 Search Theory and Detection (4-1) Winter/Summer

Search and detection as stochastic processes. Characterization of detection devices, use and interpretation of sweep widths and lateral range curves, true range curves. Measures of effectiveness of search-detection systems. Allocation of search efforts, sequential search. Introduction to the statistical theory of signal detection. Models of surveillance fields, barriers, tracking, and trailing. Prerequisite: OS2103 or OA3101.

OA3611 Principles of Operational Logistics (4-0)

Introduction to principles of Operational Logistics (OPLOG) as a discipline that encompasses the resources needed to deploy and sustain military forces at the operational level of warfare. The course includes technical (mathematical and quantitative) facets of OPLOG, as well as historical perspective, plus qualitative aspects of OPLOG that are not readily quantifiable. Topics include logistics attributes, quantitative analytical tools, OPLOG planning principles, information requirements and information flow, warfare sustainment demand forecasting, and network analysis. Prerequisites: None.

OA3650 Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) Seminar (4-0) As Required

This seminar studies the improvised explosive device (IED) problem, with special emphasis on its use by insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan. The seminar will discuss IEDs as one tactic in an insurgency and the goals and strategies with respect to the use of IEDs. The focus of the seminar will be the use of models, analysis, and systems technology to defeat the IED system. Topics include: short history of Iraq including demographics, religion, politics, and economics; access to SIPRNET data on IED incidents and analysis of attacks; geographic information systems (GIS) for display of incidents; a short overview of counterinsurgency methods that have been used in Iraq and elsewhere; systems engineering approaches to countering the use of IEDs; and operations research models of IED issues. There will be guest speakers with current knowledge of the IED threat. The seminar is open to all NPS students. Prerequisite: OS2103 or equivalent and U.S. citizenship. Classification: SECRET.

OA3801 Computational Methods for Operations Research II (3-1) As Required

An advanced course in computation, with emphasis on data structures and algorithms particularly appropriate for military Operations Research. The course is taught using a general purpose programming language. The laboratory has weekly programming assignments. Prerequisite: OA2200.

OA3900 Workshop in Operations Research/Systems Analysis (V-0) As Required

(Variable hours 2-0 to 5-0.) This course may be repeated for credit if course content changes. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

OA3910 Selected Topics in Operations Research/Systems Analysis (V-O) As Required

(Variable hours 2-0 to 5-0.) Presentation of a wide selection of topics from the current literature. This course may be repeated for credit if course content changes. Prerequisite: A background of advanced work in operations research and consent of the instructor.

<OA Courses OA4101-OA4415>

OA4101 Design of Experiments (3-1) Fall/Spring

(Same as MA4302.) Theory and application of the general linear hypothesis model. Analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. Planning experiments; traditional and hybrid experimental designs. Use of standard computer packages for analysis of experimental data. Prerequisite: OA3103 or equivalent.

OA4102 Regressions Analysis (4-0) Winter

(Same as MA4303.) Construction, analysis, and testing of regression models. An in-depth study of regression and its application in operations research, economics, and the social sciences. Prerequisites: OA3102 and OA3103.

OA4103 Advanced Probability (3-0) As Required

Probability spaces, random variables as measurable functions, expectation using the Lebesque-Stieltjes integral, and abstract integration. Modes of convergence, characteristic functions, the continuity theorem, central limit theorems, the zero-one law. Conditional expectation. Prerequisite: MA3605 or departmental approval.

OA4104 Advanced Statistics (3-0) As Required

Foundations of statistics from a decision-theoretic viewpoint. Robust estimation techniques, biased estimation. Fisher and Kullback information, asymptotic methods, sufficiency, completeness, the Cramer-Rao inequality. Sequential tests, empirical Bayes tests. Statistical computation methods. Prerequisites: OA3103 and consent of the instructor.

OA4105 Nonparametric Statistics (4-0) Fall/Summer

Inference based on the binomial distribution, including hypothesis tests, confidence intervals for percentiles, and tolerance intervals. Kaplan-Meier estimation with censored failure data. Analysis of contingency tables, including tests for goodness-of-fit and independence. Permutation tests and tests based on ranks and scores in a variety of applications. Goodness-of-fit testing for continuous distributions and families. Application of techniques to data using computing software will be emphasized. Prerequisites: OA3103 and consent of the instructor.

OA4106 Advanced Data Analysis (3-1) As Required

The course features the blending of sophisticated statistical software and data from recent DoD applications. The manipulation of multivariate data and statistical graphics are emphasized. Methodologies presented can include survival analysis, classification and discrimination, categorical data analysis, and sample survey methods. Prerequisite: OA3103.

OA4107 Categorical Data Analysis (3-1) As Required

Contingency tables in two, three, and higher dimensions. Exact procedures for small tables. The course will feature case studies and treat log-linear models, expanded logistic analysis, ordinal variables multinominal response methods. Poisson regression and the problems of sparse data sets. Applications and DoD case studies appear in the laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: OA3103.

OA4108 Data Mining (2-2) Spring

The art and science of finding real patterns in (usually very large) data sets as seen from a statistical perspective. Introduction to some of the techniques used in data mining and discussion of their implementation, their strengths and weaknesses, and some common and specific pitfalls. Algorithms for classification and regression include trees and neural networks as well as the a priori algorithm for rule generation. Techniques for clustering and visualization include hierarchical and k-means clustering and XGobi and lattice-type graphics. The Clementine and S-Plus software packages are used. Real datasets used in the past have included fraud detection data from the Defense Finance and Accounting Service. Prerequisite: OA3103.

OA4109 Survey Research Methods (4-2) Winter/Summer

The course will cover the basic principles of survey research methods. It will provide students with a practical grounding in all aspects of survey methodology, from survey instrument design, to sample design, to modes of data collection, to methods for survey data analysis. Students will be able to immediately apply course work to their theses and other real-world applications, including a class capstone project in which students will design, field, and analyze a survey on behalf of a DoD organization. Prerequisite: OA3103 and OS3101 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor.

OA4201 Nonlinear Programming (4-0) Winter/Summer

(Same as MA4301.) Convex sets, convex functions, and conditions for local and global optimality. Elements and convergence of algorithms for solving constrained and unconstrained optimization problems. Introduction to algebraic modeling languages. Many applications of integer and nonlinear programming to military and civilian problems, such as weapons assignments, force structuring, parameter estimation for nonlinear or constrained regression, personnel assignment, and resource allocation. Prerequisite: OA3201.

OA4202 Network Flows and Graphs (4-0) Fall/Spring

Introduction to formulation and solution of problems involving networks, such as maximum flow, shortest route, minimum cost flows, and PERT/CPM. Elements of graph theory, data structure, algorithms, and computational complexity. Applications to production and inventory, routing, scheduling, network interdiction, and personnel management. Prerequisite: OA3201.

OA4203 Mathematical Programming (4-0) Spring

Advanced topics in linear programming, large-scale systems, the decomposition principle, additional algorithms, bounded variable techniques, linear fractional programming, formulation and solution procedures for problems in integer variables. Applications to capital budgeting, large-scale distribution systems, weapon systems allocation, and others. Prerequisite: OA3201.

OA4204 Games of Strategy (4-0) Summer

Mathematical models of conflict situations, emphasizing the theory of decision making against a completely opposed enemy. Topics include matrix games, Blotto games, stochastic games, and the Shapley value. Applications to combat, resource allocation, cost sharing, etc. Prerequisites: OA3103, OA3201.

OA4205 Advanced Nonlinear Programming (4-0) As Required

Continuation of OA4201. Advanced topics in nonlinear programming, including duality theory, further consideration of necessary and sufficient conditions for optimality, additional computational methods examination of recent literature in nonlinear programming. Prerequisite: OA4201.

OA4301 Stochastic Models II (4-0) Winter/Summer

Course objectives are to discuss methods of stochastic modeling beyond those presented in OA3301 and give students the opportunity to apply the methods. Topics include conditioning; renewal processes; renewal reward processes; length-biased sampling, semi-Markov models, and novel queuing, reliability and maintenance models. The topics are illustrated by DoD applications. This course also is offered as MA4305. Prerequisite: None.

OA4302 Reliability and Weapons System Effectiveness Measurement (4-0) Winter/Summer

Component and system reliability functions and other reliability descriptors of system effectiveness. Relationships between system and component reliability. Point and interval estimates of reliability parameters under various life testing plans. Prerequisite: OA3301.

OA4303 Sample Inspection and Quality Assurance (4-0) Winter/Summer

Attribute and variables sampling plans. Military Standard sampling plans with modifications. Multilevel continuous sampling plans and sequential sampling plans. Structure and implementation of quality assurance programs and analysis of selected quality assurance problems. Prerequisite: OA3101 or consent of the instructor.

OA4305 Stochastic Models III (4-0) As Required

Lecture topics include nonstationary behavior of Markov processes, point process models, regenerative processes, Markovian queuing network models, and non-Markovian systems. Applications include reliability, computer system modeling, combat modeling, and manpower systems. Students are given exercises entailing data analysis, formulation of probability models, and application of models to answer specific questions concerning particular phenomena. Prerequisites: OA3103, OA3301, and OA4301.

OA4308 Time Series Analysis (4-0) As Required

(Same as MA4304.) Second order stationary processes. Harmonic analysis of correlation functions. Filters and spectral windows. Ergodic properties. Problems of inference in time series analysis. Box-Jenkins techniques. Introduction to the analysis of multivariate processes. Prerequisites: OA3103 and OA3301.

OA4321 Decision Support Systems (3-1) Winter

An introduction to the topic; includes an overview of organizational decision making, discussion of Operations Research techniques integral to Decision Support Systems, relationships to artificial intelligence and expert systems, specialized computer languages, and nontraditional techniques for handling uncertainty. Current operational systems, both military and civilian, will be used as examples. Prerequisites: OA3101 and OA3200.

OA4333 Simulation Analysis (4-0) As Required

Advanced techniques of model development and simulation experimentation. Discussion of current research. Actual topics selected will depend on the interests of the students and instructor. Prerequisite: OA3302.

OA4401 Individual Performance & Personnel Considerations (3-1) Winter/Summer

This course provides students with a working knowledge of current theories regarding individual human performance and the methods used to measure individual states and traits that affect that performance. In addition, the course includes familiarization with tests and procedures used by the DoD and industry for personnel selection and job/task assessment procedures. The course builds on information covered in OA-3401, Human Factors in Systems Design. Prerequisite: OA3401, specifically, knowledge and basic understanding of human information processing, sensation, perception, attention, vigilance, and memory OR permission of instructor.

OA4402 Training and Simulation (3-1) As Required

This course will provide an overview of learning principles, training system development and evaluation, the Instructional System Development approach, Navy training practices, and simulation training systems. Tradeoffs among personnel selection, training. and other domains of HSI will be addressed. Prerequisite: None.

OA4406 Survivability, Habitability, Environmental Safety, and Occupational Health (4-0) Summer

This course will provide an overview of personnel survivability methodology in safety, health hazards, and occupational health concepts. The evaluation of new and modified military systems and equipment for safety and potential health hazards will be addressed through reviewing models, methods, and processes available to help identify and mitigate the potential harm from accidents and hostile environments. Occupational health concerns will be addressed and methods of alleviating or minimizing workplace hazards will be analyzed. Risk analysis and mitigation models also will be examined for their contribution to increased safety and operational effectiveness. Prerequisite: None.

OA4407 Human Anthropometry and Biomechanics (3-1) Spring

This course will cover current techniques for combining anthropometric and biomechanical data to model the relationships among people, tasks, equipment, and the workplace. The historical development of anthropometric databases and human engineering models will be reviewed and current techniques and multivariate models will be introduced. Both military and commercial guidelines for ergonomic design will be covered and emphasis will be given to software tools for 3-D modeling, visualization, and workstation design. Prerequisite: None.

OA4408 Macroergonomics and Organizational Behavior in Human Systems Integration (3-1) Winter/Summer

This course systematically examines the application of macroergonomic concepts and organizational processes in orchestrating human systems integration (HSI) efforts in acquisition programs. The key concepts, principles, and theories of macroergonomics are defined and then applied to analyze organizational structures, policies, and processes that impact effective HSI efforts. Specific attention will be paid to leadership, organizational, group, and team behaviors as they impact HSI strategy, planning, program execution, and risk assessment. The material covered will then be applied to manning, training, and safety challenges in current acquisition programs. Prerequisite: None.

OA4414 Human Systems Integration Case Studies and Applications (4-0) Spring

This is the capstone course in the Human Systems Integration Certificate Program. This course provides students the opportunity to integrate and apply the materials from previous courses through the examination of actual military acquisition programs. One of the course objectives is to provide an historical analysis of both small and large military acquisition programs. The lessons learned from these historical case studies will reinforce best practices for HSI practitioners. Prerequisite: OA3413.

OA4415 HSI Case Studies and Applications (Capstone II) (4-0) Summer

This is the final course in the Naval Postgraduate School's distance learning Master of Human Systems Integration (MHSI) Program. Students will engage in a capstone project that builds on the activities in the OA44I4 HSI Case Studies and Applications (Capstone I) and all other previous courses. A typical capstone project would require a student to create a detailed HSI process document for his or her organization. This document would describe the HSI processes and activities that should be employed by that organization to design, develop, produce, deploy, operate, and support a system with an appropriate focus on the operators, maintainers, supporters, and trainers. Prerequisite: OA4414.

<OA Courses OA4501-OA4608>

OA4501 Seminar in Supply Systems (3-0) Summer

A survey of the supply system for the U.S. Navy. Topics include inventory models at all levels for consumables and repairables, budget formulation and execution, provisioning and allowance lists, planned program requirements, transaction item reporting, and current topics of research such as stock migration and material distribution studies. Prerequisite: OA3501.

OA4600 Information in Warfare (4-0) As Required

Quantitative approaches to measuring and assessing the value of information in warfare, with emphasis on tradeoffs between information and firepower. Major components are on information as precision (Bayesian filtering, data association, and fusion), and information as a guide to decision making (decision theory, Markow policies, optimization). Prerequisite: OA3102, OA3201, OA3301.

OA4601 Models for Decision Making (4-0) As Required

The objective is to be able to formulate and analyze operational and executive decision problems, where a lack of clear problem definition and data, sequential timing of decisions, uncertainty, and conflicting objectives, are all normal features of such problems. Understanding and applying influence diagrams and decision trees form the core part of the course. Emphasis is on building models and determining data requirements. Specific areas include the use of policy space analysis in sensitivity. Prerequisite: OA3304.

OA4602 Joint Campaign Analysis (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course studies the development, use, and recent applications of campaign analysis in actual procurement, force structure, and operations planning. Emphasis is on formulating the problem, choosing assumptions, structuring the analysis, and measuring effectiveness. Interpreting and communicating results in speech and writing is an important part of the course. In the last three weeks, students conduct a broad gauge, quick reaction campaign analysis as team members. Prerequisites: A course in basic probability and statistics theory, and operational experience in military environments.

OA4603 Test Evaluation (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course is designed to cover Developmental and Operational Test and Evaluation and Military Experimentation, including statistical concepts and methods frequently used in weapon system testing and experimentation environments. The course is taught from the perspective of the Program Manager, Test Project Officer, Test Engineer, Test Analyst, and Statistician. A number of actual military cases are used for examples. Topics include the Role of Test and Evaluation in Systems Engineering and Acquisition Management, Test Planning and Design, Development of Measures of Effectiveness and Measures of Performance, Conduct of Tests, Data Analysis, and Reporting of Test Results. A detailed group test planning project and design exercise are included. Upon successful completion of this course, students receive DAWIA Level II and Level III Intermediate and Advanced Test and Evaluation certification. Prerequisite: A previous course in probability and statistics, or consent of the instructor.

OA4604 Wargaming Applications (3-2) Fall/Spring

Wargaming has been an essential tool for military planning and decision making for centuries. A properly designed wargame provides a structured environment that allows military professionals to gain insight into complex military problems. The first half of the Wargaming Applications course teaches the fundamentals of wargaming using a mix of lectures and practical exercises. The second half of the course focuses on applying wargaming fundamentals to answer a DoD sponsor's real-life requirement. Student groups will design, develop, conduct, and analyze a wargame to address sponsor's needs. Prerequisite: OA4655 or consent of instructor.

OA4605 Operations Research Problems in Naval Warfare (3-0) Winter

Analysis of fleet exercises. Changes in tactics and force disposition arising from the introduction of nuclear weapons and missiles. Relationship of air defense to strike capability and USW. Current radar, sonar, communications, and ECM problems. Prerequisite: OA4604, OA4655.

OA4607 Tactical Decision Making (4-0) Spring

This course deals with computer-aided decision making. Topics include the human-computer interface, the construction of effective graphics, verification/validation, and theoretical frameworks for competitive and noncompetitive decision making. Kalman filters are introduced as an important fusion and tracking tool. The primary classroom application areas are information fusion, search/track, and mine warfare. A project is required. Prerequisites: OA3602, OS2103, OS3604 or equivalent. OS3301 or equivalent, and a working knowledge of a programming language such as MATLAB, C++, Java, or Visual Basic.

OA4608 Foreign Military Operations Research (4-0) Spring

This course considers military operations research of foreign countries that are of current concern to DoD. Because many of these have been military clients of the former Soviet Union, the course will take Soviet military operations research as a point of departure for study. Asymmetries between Soviet and American military operations research are emphasized. Exploitation of such information is discussed. Prerequisite: None.

<OA Courses OA4610-OA5810>

OA4610 Mobilization (4-0) As Required

Introduction to the military and civilian systems for mobilization, linear programming, and simulation formulations of strategic mobility and munitions scheduling. Planning and controls of the logistics systems, including planning factors and joint operations planning. Integration of mobilization with Navy operational logistics. Prerequisite: None.

OA4611 Joint and Combined Logistics (4-0) As Required

Presentation of the role of logistics and logisticians in war planning and strategy development, with emphasis on jointness. Introduction to JCS, unified, and Navy command and staff structures, and participation in deliberate and crisis action-planning process. Emphasis on the transition to war, mobilization, strategic lift, and the weapon system acquisition process as related to logistics planning. Prerequisite: OA3611.

OA4613 Energy Logistics in Warfare Operations (4-0) As Required

Case studies and quantitative analysis of energy sources, distribution, and consumption focused on the sustainment of warfare operations. Energy sources to include petroleum-based fuels, and synthetic liquid fuels and other alternative energy sources. Distribution analysis to include requirements and vulnerability of operational logistics lines of supply by ship, rail, pipeline, trucks and air. Consumption analysis to include modeling of energy consumption logistics planning factors for ship, aircraft, and ground force operations. Prerequisites: OA3201 or OA3611 or OS3007 or permission of instructor.

OA4655 Introduction to Joint Combat Modeling (4-0) Winter/Summer

(Same as MV4655.) This course covers the basic tools and concepts of joint combat modeling. Both the science and the art are emphasized. Topics include: the role of combat modeling in analyses, taxonomies of models, an introduction to some important models and organizations, measures of effectiveness, approaches to effectively using models to assist decision making, object-oriented approaches to designing entities to simulate, firing theory, one-on-one and few-on-few engagements, introduction to aggregated force-on-force modeling (including the basic Lanchester model and some of its derivatives), sensing algorithms, simulation entity decision making, simulating C4ISR processes, terrain and movement algorithms, verification, validation, and accreditation (VV&A), stochastic versus deterministic representations, hierarchies of models, and variable resolution modeling. The primary course objective is for you to understand the enduring fundamentals of how combat models are built and used to support decision making. This will be done, in part, through several small projects that will require students to design, implement, and analyze models. Prerequisites: Probability and Statistics (through third course in the sequence), familiarity with a programming language (Java recommended), Stochastic Models (OA3301), Calculus, and concurrent instruction in computer simulation (e.g., OA3302).

OA4656 Advanced Combat Modeling (4-1) As Required

The objective of this course is to educate and train model-builders (as opposed to model-users). The phenomena and situations that are modeled in this course range from fundamental shooting processes to force-on-force engagements, and from minefields to air-defense systems. Special attention is given to contemporary issues such as the effect of information in the presence of precision-guided weapons and UAVs, and the war against terror. The focus of the course is on analytic models that are based on probability and optimization techniques. Prerequisites: OA4655 and OA3301 (or OS3311).

OA4658 Survey of Joint Combat Models (1-0) Winter/Summer/Fall/Spring

The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to a wide variety of models that are being used throughout DoD. A broad cross section of models are envisioned to be taught—characteristics of the models will include both large and small models; analytical models as well as those for experimentation and/or training; theater-level as well as strategic- and tactical-level models; ground as well as air models. Prerequisite: None.

OA4701 Econometrics (4-0) Winter

Construction and testing of econometric models, analysis of economic time series, and the use of multivariate statistical analysis in the study of economic behavior. Prerequisite: OA3103.

OA4702 Cost Estimation (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course provides a broad-based understanding of the cost analysis activities involved in the acquisition and support of DoD weapon systems. In addition, it introduces operations research techniques fundamental to the field of cost estimation. The course covers the defense systems acquisition process, time value of money, and economic analysis; it develops, uses, and analyzes estimating techniques commonly encountered in both the DoD and industry, including statistical and nonstatistical cost estimating relationships, inflation indices, cost improvement curves, time phasing, and uncertainty analysis. Prerequisite: None.

OA4703 Defense Expenditure and Policy Analysis (4-0) As Required

A presentation of the major components of defense budgeting and policy formulation, from the standpoint of the three major institutions involved—the agency, executive, and congress. The use of quantitative models of institutional behavior is emphasized when examining both individual institutions and the interaction between them. Prerequisite: OA3103.

OA4704 Operations Research Techniques in Manpower Modeling (4-0) Fall/Spring

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the major types of manpower and personnel models for estimating the effects of policy changes on the personnel system. Topics include longitudinal and cross-section models, optimization models, data requirements, and validation. Application in the form of current military models are included. Prerequisite: OA3103 or consent of the instructor.

OA4801 Spreadsheet Modeling for Military Operations Research (3-2) As Required

Implementation of a wide variety of military operations research topics on software accessible in any typical Department of Defense (Fleet) environment. This course highlights military spreadsheet applications of operations research methods (e.g., discrete event simulation, optimization, queuing, Markov chains), discusses limitations, and demonstrates methods to supplement and customize spreadsheet analytical functions. Prerequisites: OA3103, OA3301 and OA3302.

OA4910 Selected Topics in Operations Analysis (V-0) As Required

(Variable hours 2-0 to 5-0.) Presentation of a wide selection of topics from the current literature. This course may be repeated for credit if course content changes. Prerequisites: A background of advanced work in operations research and departmental approval.

OA4930 Readings in Operations Analysis (V-0) As Required

(Variable hours 2-0 to 5-0.) This course may be repeated for credit if course content changes. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

OA5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) All Quarters

Dissertation research for doctoral students. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council. Prerequisite: Advancement to Candidacy.

OS Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<OS Courses OS2080-OS3211>

OS2080 Probability and Statistics I (3-0) Fall/Spring

Fundamentals of probability and statistics useful in military modeling. Topics include probability laws and calculation methods, conditional probability, Bayes' Theorem, discrete and continuous random variables, the binomial, geometric, Poisson, exponential, and normal distributions, expectation, variance, and covariance, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and simple linear regression. Emphasis is on understanding uncertainty and developing computational skills for military systems analysis. Prerequisite: Single variable calculus.

OS2101 Analysis of Experimental Data (4-0) As Required

Introduction to statistical analysis of measurements and experimental data. Frequency distributions, graphical representation. Populations and sampling. Principle of least squares, estimation of mean and standard deviation. Curve fitting and regression, propagation of errors. Confidence intervals, tests and contingency tables. Elementary ANOVA. Relevant probabilistic concepts introduced as needed. Prerequisite: None.

OS2103 Applied Probability for Systems Technology (4-1) Fall/Winter/Summer

A first course in probability for students in operational curricula. Topics include probability laws and calculation methods, discrete and continuous random variables, common probability distributions, introduction to modeling, expectation, variance, covariance, and rudiments of discrete time processes. Emphasis is on understanding uncertainty and developing computational skills in probability. Prerequisites: Single variable differentiation and integration at the MA1113 level and multiple integration at the MA1115 level.

OS3000 Introduction to Management Science (3-0) As Required

A survey of techniques for making decisions quantitatively. Utility theory, linear programming, decision trees, networks and graphs, games, simulation, and waiting lines. Prerequisites: OS2103.

OS3002 Operations Research for Naval Intelligence (4-0) Fall

This course provides an introduction to the approach and methods of operations research, with special emphasis on military applications of interest to intelligence. It focuses on the mathematical modeling of combat operations and considers intelligence aspects. Students develop basic skills in such modeling. Topics include: operational definitions, measurement of combat effectiveness, model validation/verification, and models versus modeling. Also included are modeling of processes of target acquisition, fire assessment (kill probabilities and target coverage), tactical decision making, and games. Prerequisite: None.

OS3003 Operations Research for Information Operations (4-0) Summer

This course is a survey of operations research techniques. Spreadsheet analysis using Excel is applied to problem solving using methods in optimization, network flow, simulation, queuing, forecasting and decision analysis. Students will practice defining a problem, formulating a model, attaining a solution and evaluating the results using operations research techniques. The relationship between operations research and information operations is explored. Students will develop and understanding of operations research techniques and their application in the information operations domain. Prerequisite: OS2103.

OS3004 Operations Research for Computer Systems Managers (4-1) Fall/Spring

A one-quarter survey of operations research techniques of particular interest to students in computer systems management. Topics covered include: optimization, network flow models, simulation, queuing, forecasting techniques, Markov chains, decision analysis, reliability, and project management techniques. Spreadsheet models and analysis tools are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: OS3101 and MA2300.

OS3006 Operations Research for Cost Analysts (3-0) Summer

This course is a survey of operations research techniques. Spreadsheet analysis using Excel is applied to problem solving using methods in decision theory, linear programming, network flow, simulation, queuing, forecasting, and project management techniques. Students will practice defining a problem, formulating a model, attaining a solution and evaluating the results using operations research techniques. Subject Matter Experts in cost estimation will provide an overview and background in cost estimation. Cost estimation examples are provided as part of homework exercises. Prerequisites: Single-variable calculus (MA1117).

OS3007 Operations Research for Energy Systems Analysts (4-0) Summer

A survey of operations research techniques with emphasis on techniques relevant to energy applications. Topics covered include optimization, stochastic modeling, simulation, and statistical methods including forecasting and system test and evaluation. Excel-based spreadsheet models are used to analyze energy systems and energy consumption logistics during wartime operations and during peacetime.

OS3008 Analytical Planning Methodology (4-0) Spring

A one-quarter survey of operations research techniques of particular interest to students in the C4I curriculum, with emphasis on model formation. Topics include linear and nonlinear programming, integer programming, networks, shop flow and project scheduling, decision analysis, queuing, and simulation. Prerequisite: MA2300.

OS3080 Probability and Statistics II (3-0) Summer/Winter

Additional topics in probability and statistics for systems analysis, including conditional probability and conditional expectation, basic analytical process models, graphical data analysis, simple and multiple regression, and basic time-series analysis. This course is a follow-on to OS2080 for Master of Systems Analysis students. Prerequisite: OS2080.

OS3081 Systems Analysis Cases I (3-0) Summer/Winter

This is the first course in a three-course sequence in systems analysis practice. This course focuses on learning from real defense systems analysis case histories through readings, discussion, and writing point papers. Emphasis is on understanding the pitfalls of analysis, highlighting critical assumptions, and recognition of the strengths and weaknesses of applied analytical methodologies. Case histories include actual defense studies conducted with large-scale warfare simulations, seminar wargaming, and other methodologies common in DoD studies and analysis. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Systems Analysis, Operations Research, or Systems Engineering; completion of courses in probability, statistics, simulation, uncertainty modeling, cost-benefit, decision analysis, and optimization.

OS3082 Systems Analysis Cases II (3-0) Spring/Fall

This is the second course in a three-course sequence in systems analysis practice. This course focuses on learning from participating in class discussion of decision and analysis problem cases and writing concise systems analysis proposals. Cases are drawn from scenarios in defense planning, programming, and budgeting of weapons systems and forces. Emphasis is on systems analysis problem formulation, identification of objectives, measures of effectiveness, articulation of critical assumptions, and outlining of appropriate analytical methodologies. Special emphasis is placed on cases that are typical of quick turn-around, limited-resources Pentagon programming analysis and budget drills. Prerequisite: OS3081.

OS3101 Statistical Analysis for Management (4-1) Winter/Summer

A specialized course covering the basic methods of probability and statistics with emphasis on managerial applications. The course includes applications of probability models, statistical inference, and regression analysis. Computation for these applications are carried out on a computer, using commercial software packages. Topics in probability include the binomial, geometric, Poisson, and normal distributions, risk, and expected value. Parametric statistical techniques include significance testing and confidence intervals, together with point estimation of model parameters. Regression analysis includes simple linear regression and multiple regression, with estimation of parameters and tests of hypothesis and confidence intervals for regression coefficients and the variance of the error term. Prerequisite: College algebra.

OS3104 Statistics for Science and Engineering (4-0) Winter/Summer

Acquaint the engineering student with the techniques of statistical data analysis with examples from quality control, life testing, reliability, and sampling inspection. Histograms and empirical distributions and random variables are introduced, along with their probability distributions and associated characteristics such as moments and percentiles. Following a brief introduction to decision making, standard tests of hypotheses and confidence intervals for both one- and two-parameter situations are treated. Regression analysis is related to least squares estimation and associated tests of hypotheses and confidence intervals are treated. Prerequisite: Calculus.

OS3105 Statistics for Technical Management (4-1) Fall/Spring

The course emphasizes management applications of probability models, statistical inference, and regression analysis. Those aspects of probability germane to distributions such as the binomial and normal are covered. Statistical inference for one and two variables is introduced in the settings of both hypothesis testing and confidence interval estimation. Students develop problem solving and numerical computation skills during laboratory periods using commercial software packages. Prerequisite: None.

0S3111 Probability and Statistics for HSI and MOVES (4-0) Fall/Spring

Noncalculus-based introduction in the context. Descriptive statistics and graphical techniques. Probability rules including Bayes Rule and independence. Discrete and continuous probability distributions, expected values, quantiles, variance, covariance, correlation, expected values, and variance of linear combinations of random variables, notably the sample mean. Fundamentals of statistics in one-sample setting including the ideas of estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Use and comparison of parametric and nonparametric approaches. Prerequisite: None.

OS3112 Statistics and Design of Experiments (4-2) Winter/Summer

This course reviews the basic concepts of data collection, data description, and graphical displays. It covers fundamentals of experimental design and analysis of categorical data. Students will learn how to set and analyze experiments using basic experimental design starting with two-sample methods and advancing to designs such as factorials, fractional factorials, and randomized block designs. Designs appropriate for human research (such as repeated measure designs) and/or large-scale simulation experiments (such as Latin hypercube designs) are included. Parametric and nonparametric approaches are compared and contrasted. Methods for analyzing categorical data are introduced: one- and two-sample inference for proportions, and contingency tables. Datasets and motivational examples are drawn from recent research relevant to HSI and/or MOVES. Prerequisites: College algebra and OS3111.

OS3113 Data Analysis for HSI and MOVES (4-1) Winter

Regression techniques using hands-on experience. Emphasis throughout is on real problems and real data. Topics covered include Simple Linear Regression, Multiple Regression, and Logistic and Loglinear Regression. Special topics include regression trees, principle components, and factor analysis. Prerequisite: None.

OS3180 Probability and Statistics for Systems Engineering (4-1) Winter/Summer

This course introduces the systems engineering and analysis student to probability, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and regression. The modeling and analysis of the stochastic behavior of systems provides the context for the course. Topical coverage includes the normal, binomial, Poisson, exponential, and lognormal distributions; probabilistic measures of system performance; graphical and numerical data summaries; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests based on one or two samples; regression with one or more predictors; and single factor analysis of variance. The lab portion of the class uses spreadsheets to support the modeling and analyses. The course is delivered in block format. Prerequisite: SE1001 or equivalent.

OS3211 Systems Optimization (4-0) Fall

This course is an application-oriented introduction to optimization. It introduces models (linear, integer, and nonlinear programs), modeling tools (sensitivity and post-optimality analysis), and optimization software and solution techniques (including heuristics). It presents many military and private sector optimization applications in production planning and scheduling, inventory planning, personnel scheduling, project scheduling, distribution systems planning, facility sizing and capacity expansion, communication systems design, and product development. Prerequisite: None.

<OS Courses OS3301-OS4703>

OS3301 Simulation Modeling and Analysis (3-1) Fall

OS3301 is a simulation and analytical course that provides students with a foundation in simulation theory and process modeling, random number generation concepts, basic queuing theory in process modeling, applied data analysis, an introduction into experimental design, hypothesis testing, and hands-on system simulation using a simulation modeling package. Students will use these concepts in class projects to simulate systems, evaluate system performance, and compare alternative systems. Prerequisites: OS2080, or OS2103 and OS3604, or equivalent.

OS3302 Quality Assurance and Reliability (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course is a technical treatment of a contractor's quality assurance program with attention to Sampling Inspection, Statistical Process Control, and Reliability. Topics include attribute and variables sampling plans, MILSTD/ANSI/ASQC and sequential sampling plans, quality control chart development and utilization, and manufacturing process capability estimation. Process management analytical tools are introduced using Minitab Quality Control software applications. Structure and implementation of quality assurance programs and quality improvement measures are discussed. Fundamentals of reliability modeling, life testing, reliability growth, estimation, and assessment are presented. Time and failure censored life-testing methods for Exponential and Weibull reliability models and Bayesian reliability estimation techniques are introduced. Best Management Practices and Program Managers Workstation are reviewed. Prerequisite: A previous course in probability and statistics.

OS3303 Computer Simulation (4-1) Fall/Spring

Design, implementation and use of digital simulation models will be covered with special emphasis on features common to USW problems. Wargaming will be discussed and a game using the digital computer will be played and critiqued by the class. Exercise planning and analysis will be treated. Basic topics are explained including computer generation of random variates, statistical design and monitoring of model progress, machine representation of dynamic data structures, model verification and validation on special purpose simulation and gaming languages. Prerequisites: OS2103 and OS3604, or equivalent.

OS3307 Modeling Practices for Computing (4-1) Fall/Spring

An applied course in modeling and understanding systems where randomness plays a significant role. Topics include basic probability and statistics, queuing models, Monte Carlo and discrete-event simulation, least squares curve fitting, and elements of statistical design of experiments. The focus will be on applications of these techniques in a computer science context. Prerequisites: Discrete Math and Introductory Programming.

OS3311 Probability Models for Military Applications (4-0) Fall/Spring

An intermediate course in probability modeling focused on military systems and combat situations. Following a review of random variables, probability distributions, expected values and variance, we will present a selection of probability models that range from elementary models that describe static and simple dynamic military (mostly combat) related situations, to Markov models that represent more complex combat situations (e.g., tactical battle) and processes (e.g., surveillance and employment of UAVs). Prerequisite: None.

OS3380 Combat Systems Simulation (3-1) Fall/Spring

This course provides an introduction to discrete and continuous time modeling of systems, especially combat systems. Students learn the fundamentals of simulation modeling and analysis, and construct increasingly sophisticated models of combat behavior. Students are introduced to Lanchester equations and other abstract models, as well as JANUS and other high-resolution, commercial combat simulation programs. Students reinforce and extend statistical skills by learning the principles for design and analysis of simulation experiments for estimation and comparison. The primary course objective is for the student to understand the enduring fundamentals of how combat models are built and used to support decision making. Prerequisites: SE1002 and OS3180.

OS3401 Human Factors in System Design (3-1) Summer

This course will provide an introduction to the field of Human Factors for Systems Engineering students with an emphasis on military systems. Humans are the most important element of any military system. Consequently, the design of effective systems must take into account human strengths and limitations as well as considerations of human variability. The course surveys human factors, human-centered design, and system effectiveness and safety. Topics include system design in light of human cognition and performance as they are influenced by physiological, anthropometric and environmental considerations. Emphasis is given to the responsibility of Systems Engineers to assure human performance and system effectiveness. Prerequisite: None.

OS3403 Human Factors in Information Warfare (3-1) Winter

This course will provide the student with the ability to evaluate and predict human performance in specified operational environments. The effects of stress factors such as noise, temperature, motion, work load, etc., on various aspects of human performance will be studied. Students will identify the control and display requirements or an EW system and design a work space to accommodate an EW data reduction/analysis system. Prerequisite: OS3604.

OS3404 Human-Machine Interaction (3-2) Fall/Winter/Spring

An introduction to the man-machine interface problems in C3. Information, display, and human communication requirements for effective C3. Applied orientation involving message handling systems, query languages, computer-to-computer communications, command and control applications programs, file transfer between host computers, etc. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Joint C4I curriculum.

OS3603 Simulation and Wargaming (3-1) Fall/Summer

This course introduces students to systemic and interactive war-game simulation models. The students will understand and play two interactive war games and will run an existing systemic combat model to conduct output and sensitivity analysis on the results. Basic topics include measures of effectiveness, Monte Carlo processes for generating simulation events, decision and utility models, high resolution versus aggregated combat models, scenario development, and analysis objectives. Prerequisites: Basic Probability, Statistics, and Data Analysis at the level of OS2103 and OS3604 or equivalent, and a working knowledge of a computer programming language.

OS3604 Statistics and Data Analysis (4-1) Fall

An introduction to statistics and data analysis for students in the operational curricula. Topics include point and interval estimation, hypotheses testing, analysis of variance, multiple regression techniques, and categorical data analysis. Emphasis is placed on decision rules and in the analysis of data sets from operational environments. Computations are done in a statistical analysis package. Prerequisite: A course in probability (OS2103 or equivalent).

OS3640 Framework for Countering Improvised Explosive Devices (2-0) Spring/Fall

The course describes the use of improvised explosive devices in contemporary warfare with emphasis on how to organize to counter an IED campaign. The course begins with descriptions of IED devices, why and how they are used, methods and technology to counter IEDs, the IED organization, how to organize to counter an IED campaign, and how to target organizations that control IED violence. A framework is developed to understand and address the many interlocking aspects of countering an IED campaign including: insurgency and civil war; recruiting, training, and financing of IED makers; data collection; geospatial analysis; crime forensics; intelligence; detainee interrogations; reconstruction; political and economic development; society and culture; information operations; training local police, security forces, and military personnel; reconciliation; and negotiations. The class will be taught in the accelerated mode with four hours per week for the first six weeks of the quarter. There will be extensive reading, weekly homework, and a short paper. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: None.

OS3661 Introduction to Modeling and Simulation in Test and Evaluation (4-0) (DL)

This course introduces the use of modeling and simulation as a complement to physical testing in support of systems evaluation. The general relationships among modeling, simulation, test, and evaluation are introduced in context of systems acquisition lifecycle management. Forms of Live, Virtual and Constructive simulation in support of test planning, test execution, and systems analysis will be described, characterized, and illustrated with real-world examples. VV&A issues and opportunities relevant to the integrated use of simulation and testing in Systems Engineering and Acquisition will be identified. Strategies to optimize the use of scarce resources in executing test and evaluation programs will be provided. Methodologies for identifying and developing test MOEs, MOPs, and test scenarios will be introduced. Appropriate statistical concepts for evaluating Performance Guarantees and Specifications will be presented. Students in groups will develop a detailed T&E and Simulation Plan for a weapons system or future systems of systems concept. Prerequisite: None.

OS3680 Naval Tactical Analysis (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course surveys and applies various tools of operational and decision analysis to naval tactical problems. Topics include basic operational and tactical problem formulation, tactical decision analysis, and the application of uncertainty models for tactical problems in search and detection and weapons effectiveness. Prerequisite: A course in calculus-based probability and statistics (OS2080, OS3104, OS3180 or equivalent) or permission of the instructor.

OS3701 Cost Estimation I: Methods and Techniques (3-0) Fall/Spring (DL)

This course provides a broad-based understanding of the cost analysis activities involved in the acquisition and support of DoD systems. It introduces operations research techniques fundamental to the field of cost estimation. The course covers the defense systems acquisition process, time value of money, cost processes, data collection and sources, and economic analysis; it develops, uses, and analyzes cost estimating techniques commonly encountered in both the DoD and industry, including statistical and nonstatistical cost estimating relationships, inflation indices, cost improvement curves, time phasing, wrap rates, and uncertainty analysis. Prerequisite: OS3080 or equivalent.

OS3703 Systems Assessment (4-0) Winter/Summer

It introduces operations research techniques fundamental to the evaluation of concepts, processes and systems. Topics include cost estimation, effectiveness estimation through the T&E process, techniques for conducting design trades, and managing the risk involved. Development of communication skills is accomplished through oral presentations and written reports. Prerequisite: A graduate course in probability and statistics or consent of the instructor.

<OS Courses OS4001-OS4703>

OS4001 Introduction to Probabilistic Modeling for HSI (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course will introduce the student to desktop modeling of humans, particularly emphasizing models that are relevant to military systems. The course will demonstrate current software tools designed around models of human stature, movement, and behavior. We will focus on the utilization of existing modeling techniques, which are useful for system design or evaluation, e.g., JACK, MicroSAINT, and SAFTE/FAST. Prerequisite: None.

OS4010 Engineering Risk Benefit Analysis (3-2) As Required

This course emphasizes three methodologies: Decision Analysis (DA), Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (RPRA), and Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA). The course is designed to give students an understanding of how these diverse topics can be applied to the decision-making process of product design, which must take into consideration significant risk. The course will present and interpret a framework for balancing risks and benefits to applicable situations. Typically, these involve human safety, potential environmental effects, and large financial and technological uncertainties. Concepts from CBA and RPRA are applied to real-world problems, resulting in decision models that provide insight and understanding, and consequently lead to improved decisions. Prerequisite: None.

OS4011 Risk Benefit Analysis (3-2) Fall/Spring

This course emphasizes decision analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and cost-benefit analysis in systems analysis and systems acquisition contexts. The course is designed to give students an understanding of how these diverse topics can be applied to a decision-making process that must take into consideration significant technological and financial risk. The course will present and interpret a framework for balancing risks and benefits to applicable situations. Typically, these involve large financial and technological uncertainties. Concepts are applied to real-world problems resulting in decision models that provide insight, understanding, and improvement of acquisition decisions. Prerequisite: OS3080 or an equivalent graduate-level course in probability modeling.

OS4012 Cost Estimation III: Risk and Uncertainty Analysis (3-0) Winter/Summer

Risk and Uncertainty Analysis provides the foundation for an understanding of risk management as it relates to cost estimation. It addresses program risks that help ensure program costs, schedule, and performance objectives are met. Students are given an overview of how to model the cost/risk associated with a defense acquisition program. Topics covered include basic probability concepts, correlation, cost drivers, subjective probability assessment, goodness-of-fit testing, and simulation concepts using spreadsheet-based simulation packages. Monte Carlo simulation based cost risk case reinforce the techniques taught. Prerequisites: OS3080 and OS3701.

OS4013 Cost Estimation VI: Decision Analysis for Cost Estimators (3-0) Winter

This course presents an introduction to the techniques of Decision analysis. Decision analysis techniques can be used to help decision makers solve complex decision problems involving sequential decisions, major uncertainties, imperfect information, varying degrees of risk, and often multiple competing or conflicting objectives. The course includes structuring decision with influence diagrams and decision trees, modeling uncertainty with subjective probabilities, sensitivity analysis, the value of information, and modeling risk attitudes using utility theory. A fundamental understanding of probability and calculus is expected. Prerequisites: OS3080, OS3006, OS4702.

OS4080 Cost Estimation V: Cost Estimating and Analysis Cases (3-0) Summer/Winter (starting Summer 2012)

This course focuses on learning from real cost estimation case histories through readings, discussion, and writing point papers. Emphasis is on understanding the capabilities and limitations of cost estimation and analysis, highlighting critical assumptions, and recognition of the strengths and weaknesses of applied analytical methods. Case histories include actual department of defense cost studies conducted that have been considered successes and those that have been considered failures. These cases provide the lessons learned for future cost estimation and analysis studies. Prerequisite: OS4703.

OS4081 Cost Estimating and Analysis Capstone I (3-4) Fall/Spring (starting Fall 2013)

This course focuses on learning from participating in a cost estimation team project. Small-teams (4-6 students) will be given an actual cost estimating analysis project drawn from actual cost problems compiled by the major systems commands and Service Cost Agencies from the departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Emphasis is on cost problem formulation, identification of objectives, measures of effectiveness, articulation of critical assumptions, and outlining of appropriate analytical methods. Class time during the quarter is used for team progress briefings and critical class discussion. Prerequisite: OS4080.

OS4082 Cost Estimating and Analysis Capstone II (3-4) Winter/Summer (starting Winter 2013)

This course continues the on hands-on experience of OS4081, completing the cost estimation project. Student teams will develop the cost model and analyze alternative cost estimations of the problems presented in the previous course; they will develop and test the estimate, and then document and defend their estimate. Students provide concise written reports, which include the analytical results, and a presentation to decision makers. Class time during the quarter is used for team progress briefings and critical class discussion. Prerequisite: OS4801.

OS4083 Systems Analysis Cases III (3-4) Summer/Winter

This is the third course in a three-course sequence in systems analysis practice. This course focuses on hands-on experience conducting rapid quantitative systems analysis. Emphasis is on small-team (2-3 students) systems analysis projects and presentations. Typical projects are based on analysis proposals developed in the preceding course. Class time during the quarter is used for team progress briefings and critical class discussion. The projects culminate with a concise written report, including analytical results, and a presentation to decision makers. Prerequisite: OS3082.

OS4580 Logistics Systems Analysis (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course is about military logistics systems. It includes processes employed during system acquisition, chiefly reliability and maintainability analyses, which contribute, along with other aspects of a military logistics system, to determining the operational support costs and operational availability of military systems. In-service support includes the supply system for repair parts for organizational-level maintenance and the provision of military or contractor support of depot-level maintenance. Operational logistics includes logistics planning and predicting the sustainability of deployed forces. Prerequisites: OS3180 and SE3100.

OS4621 Critical Infrastructure Analysis and Defense (4-0) Spring

The premise of this course is straightforward: our dependence on critical infrastructures makes us vulnerable to both deliberate and non-deliberate events that can disrupt our physical, economic, and social welfare. This course develops the literacy and competencies necessary to understand potential problems and realistic solutions for critical military and civilian infrastructure in the United States. Students gain experience in the use of "red teaming" analysis for evaluating infrastructure vulnerability through case studies on civilian and DoD/DoN systems, and through a course project. This course is restricted to U.S. students only. Prerequisites: NS3180 or OA4202 or consent of instructor.

OS4661 Advanced Modeling and Simulation in Test and Evaluation (4-0) (DL)

This course addresses advanced issues in the application of modeling and simulation as a compliment to physical testing in support of systems evaluation. It introduces pre-test simulation using experimental designs to identify the most important factors to be used in live testing scenarios. Detailed analysis methods of testing and simulation results including military and statistical significance are addressed. Additional topics include reliability modeling and life testing and various enabling architectures in distributed simulation. Applications to Analysis of Alternatives and rapid acquisitions are discussed. Various forms of simulation in support of test planning, test execution, and systems analysis are described including simulation facilities and test ranges. Students in groups will conduct a comparative analysis of competing systems using experimental design and simulation methods. Prerequisite: OS3661Introduction to Modeling and Simulation in Test and Evaluation.

OS4680 Naval Systems Analysis (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course covers the techniques for the analysis of proposed and existing systems. It includes analysis of alternatives and models in decision making, optimization in design and operations, queuing theory and analysis, Markov analysis, and selected topics to support project work. Students analyze case studies and complete a course project. Students also use spreadsheet software for modeling and analyzing design alternatives, and develop communication skills by writing reports of analyses. Prerequisites: OS2080 or OS3180, OS3380 and OS3680.

OS4701 Manpower and Personnel Models (4-0) Winter/Summer

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the major types of manpower and personnel models for estimating the effects of policy changes on the personnel system. Topics include longitudinal and cross-section models, optimization models, data requirements, and validation. Application in the form of current military models is included. Prerequisites: GB3040 and GB4043, or OA3103, or consent of the instructor.

OS4702 Cost Estimation II: Advanced Concepts in Cost Estimating (3-0) Winter/Summer

This course is the second of three sequential cost estimation courses. It provides a broad-based understanding of the cost estimating principles applied to various fields of the acquisition and support of DoD systems. It introduces topics such as Cost Estimating Relationships, non-Ordinary Least Squares methods, Software Cost Estimating, Labor Pricing, Source Selection Process, Cost Management, EVMS, and higher level Regression Applications. Prerequisite: OS3701 or OA4702.

OS4703 Cost Estimation IV: Applied Cost Analysis (3-0) Spring/Fall

This course is the third of three sequential cost estimation courses. It provides a broad based understanding of the cost estimating principles applied to various fields of the acquisition and support of DoD systems. It focuses on the analysis of cost methods and topics such as Specialized Cost Estimating, Portfolio Analysis, Cost Benefit Analysis, Industrial Base Analysis, Supply Chain Management, and Labor Rates. Prerequisite: OS4702 or OA4702.

Human Systems Integration Certificate - Curriculum 262

Program Manager

Lawrence G. Shattuck, Ph.D.

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 234

(831) 656-2473, DSN 756-2473

FAX: (831) 656-2595

lgshattu@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Human Systems Integration Certificate program is a distance learning, graduate-level, non-degree program designed to enable acquisition professionals, program managers, engineers and scientists of the DoD to effectively implement Human Systems Integration (HSI) as required by the DoD.

Students will learn the fundamentals in applying usability assessments, modeling, optimization, and decision making to demonstrate cost-benefit trade-offs for technical, cost, and schedule modifications in systems acquisition.

The program consists of four online courses taken over a 12 month period. The course content and projects address problems of interest to the DoD.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above average grades and an academic profile code of 345. Two or more pre-calculus courses with B or better average. Completion of DAU ACQ 101 and ACQ 201A.

Entry Dates

Summer quarter.

Program Length

Four quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the certificate are met by successful completion of all four courses, in succession.

Required Courses

OA3411

Introduction to Human Systems Integration

(3-0)

OA3412

Human Systems Integration in the Department of Defense Acquisition Lifecycle

(3-0)

OA3413

Human Systems Integration Tools, Tradeoffs, and Processes

(3-1)

OA4414

Human Systems Integration Case Studies and Applications

(4-0)

Cost Estimating and Analysis Certificate (DL) - Curriculum 289

Program Manager

Daniel Nussbaum, Ph.D.

Code OR/Glasgow, Room 242

(831) 656-2387, DSN 756-2387

danussba@nps.edu

Greg Mislick, Lecturer

Code OR/Glasgow Hall, Room 202

(831) 656-3113, DSN 756-3113

gmislick@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Cost Estimating and Analysis certificate program is a distance learning, graduate-level, non-degree program designed to provide cost estimating and analysis training to Navy and other DoD personnel. The program consists of four courses delivered one per quarter via distance learning over a one-year period.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree is required. Recent completion (within five years) of mathematics through single variable differential and integral calculus is considered minimal preparation. Prior course work in probability and statistics, including regression is essential for successful completion of the certificate. An academic profile code (APC) of 335 is required.

Program Length

Four quarters

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the graduate-level certificate in Cost Estimating and Analysis are met by successful completion of all four required courses.

Required Courses

OS3006

(3-0)

Operations Research for Cost Analysts

OS3701

or

OA4702

(3-0)

Cost Estimation I: Methods and Techniques, or

Cost Estimation

OS4702

(3-0)

Cost Estimation II: Advanced Concepts in Cost Estimating

OS4012

(3-0)

Cost Estimation III: Risk and Uncertainty Analysis

Certificate in Systems Analysis - Curriculum 281

Program Officer

Jeffrey F. Hyink, CAPT, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 226

(831) 656-3094, DSN 756-3094
FAX (831) 656-2595

jfhyink@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steven E. Pilnick, Ph.D.

Code OR/Ps, Glasgow Hall, Room 291

(831) 656-2283, DSN 756-2283
FAX (831) 656-2595

spilnick@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Systems Analysis Certificate program is a distance learning, graduate-level, nondegree program designed to meet the needs of the Navy and other services in the Department of Defense (DoD) for nondegree technical education in systems analysis as a basis for aiding key decisions on force requirements, weapon systems, and other defense matters. Students learn and apply modeling, optimization, simulation, and decision making under risk and uncertainty.

The Certificate Program consists of four, fully-accredited courses delivered entirely online over a one-year period. The course content and projects will challenge the student academically and address problems of interest to the Department of Defense. The courses are paced week-to-week by the instructors, but the students have great flexibility to do their course work at times of their choosing during each week.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree is required. Completion of mathematics through single variable differential and integral calculus is considered minimal preparation. An academic profile code (APC) of 335 is required.

Entry Dates

At the beginning of the spring and fall quarters, with start dates in late March/early April and late September/early October, respectively.

Program Length

Four Quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the graduate certificate in Systems Analysis are met by successful completion of all four courses.

Required Courses

Quarter 1

OS2080

(3-0)

Probability and Statistics I

Quarter 2

OS3380

(3-1)

Combat Systems Simulation

Quarter 3

OS3680

(4-0)

Naval Tactical Analysis

Quarter 4

OS4680

(4-0)

Naval Systems Analysis

Systems Engineering Analysis Program - Curriculum 308

This curriculum is described under the Systems Engineering Analysis Curriculum and Program section of this Catalog. The Department of Operations Research supports this curriculum with courses, faculty and project advisors.

Operations Analysis (Energy) - Curriculum 358

Program Officer

Walter C. DeGrange, CDR, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 254

(831) 656-3026, DSN 756-3026

FAX (831) 656-2595

wcdegran@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steven E. Pilnick, Ph.D.

Code OR/Ps, Glasgow Hall, Room 291

(831) 656-2283, DSN 756-2283

FAX (831) 656-2595

spilnick@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Operations Analysis (OA) curriculum was founded by the Navy in 1951, in order to retain, develop, and promulgate the methods of Operations Research (OR) that were used so successfully in World War II. OR is the science of helping people and organizations make better decisions. More formally, it is the development and application of mathematical models, statistical analyses, simulations, analytical reasoning, and common sense to the understanding and improvement of real-world operations. Improvement can be measured by the minimization of cost, maximization of efficiency, or optimization of other relevant measures of effectiveness. Practitioners are called on to advise military and civilian decision makers on the allocation of scarce resources, the selection of new equipment and processes, and the optimal deployment of given resources to achieve required missions.

The Energy Option applies targeted education in Energy technology and policy with the discipline of OA to enable the graduate to focus on Energy-related analysis concerning such issues as:

Mathematics, probability, statistics, economics, human factors, and optimization supply the theoretical background for analyzing alternative choices in tactical and strategic warfare, and in planning, budgeting, and procurement of systems and forces. The student learns computational methods and develops skills to identify relevant information, formulate decision criteria, and select alternatives. This education enhances performance in all duties throughout a military career including operational billets, technical management assignments, and policy-making positions.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of mathematics through single variable differential and integral calculus with above-average grades is considered minimal preparation. Students without these quantitative prerequisites will be accepted in cases where their undergraduate records indicate that they are exceptional students and there are other indicators of potential. An academic profile code (APC) of 325 is required. Waivers may be obtained with a one-quarter refresher.

Entry Date

Operations Analysis (Energy) is a seven-quarter course of study (eight quarters including JPME) with an entry date in September. If required, students attend one-quarter mathematics "refresher'' prior to entering the OA curriculum. This refresher sequence begins in July for the September start dates. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curricular program as well as Service Intermediate-level PME and Phase I Joint PME credit.

Master of Science in Operations Research

The Master of Science in Operations Research degree requires:

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as an Operations Analysis – Energy Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 3213P and JPME Phase I education certification for students whose orders include the extra quarter for JPME. The community manager for the OA subspecialty and major area sponsor of the curriculum is the Director of the Chief of Naval Operations, Assessment Division (OPNAV N81). The subject matter expert for the Energy Option is OPNAV N45, the Director of the Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division.

Typical Course of Study (OA Energy Option- with JPME)

Quarter 0 (Refresher, if needed)

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus

MA1114

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus II

MA1025

(4-0)

Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning

OA1600

(2-2)

Introduction to Operations Analysis I

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 1

MA3042

(4-0)

Linear Algebra

MA1118

(4-0)

Multivariable Calculus

OA3101

(4-1)

Probability

OA2801

(4-1)

Computational Methods for Operations Research

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 2

OA3201

(4-0)

Linear Programming

OA3102

(4-2)

Statistics

OA3301

(4-0)

Stochastic Models I

PH3700

(4-0)

Fundamentals of Energy

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 3

OA4202

(4-0)

Network Flows and Graphs

OA3103

(4-1)

Data Analysis

OA3302

(4-0)

Simulation Modeling

MN4970

(4-0)

Energy Economics

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 4

OA4201

(4-0)

Nonlinear Programming

OA4106

(3-1)

Advanced Data Analysis

OA4333

(4-0)

Simulation Analysis

OS3007

(4-0)

OR for Energy Systems Analysts

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 5

OA4655

(4-0)

Introduction to Joint Combat Modeling

OA4801

(3-2)

Spreadsheet Modeling for Operations Research

OA3900

(5-0)

OA (Energy) Experience Tour (3 weeks)

OA46xx

(4-0)

Energy Logistics in Warfare Operations

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 6

OA3304

(4-0)

Decision Theory

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

 

(V-V)

JPME

OA0810

(0-8)

(Energy) Thesis Research

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 7

 

(V-V)

JPME

 

(V-V)

JPME

OA4301

(4-0)

Stochastic Models II

OA0810

(0-8)

(Energy) Thesis Research

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 8

OA4602

(4-0)

Joint Campaign Analysis

OA4656

(4-0)

Advanced Combat Modeling

 

(V-V)

JPME

OA0810

(0-8)

(Energy) Thesis Research

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Operations Analysis (Energy) - Curriculum 358
Subspecialty Code: 3213P

Operations Analysis Core ESRs

  1. Basics: The graduate will possess the mathematical and computer programming skills required to support graduate study in operations research and have the ability to use computers as a tool to aid in analysis.
  2. Optimization: The graduate will be able to formulate and solve a wide variety of optimization problems and also be conversant with the major uses of such models in DoD and the private sector.
  3. Stochastic Modeling: The graduate will be able to formulate and solve problems involving stochastic processes (processes with uncertainty over time) and also be familiar with the major applications of such models.
  4. Simulation: The graduate will be able to construct and utilize simulations of combat and other processes that evolve in time, and will be able to deal with statistical issues associated with the need for replication.
  5. Analysis of Military Operations: The graduate will be familiar with U.S./allied and potential enemy capabilities, doctrine, tactical and logistical support concepts. The graduate will be able to model and analyze military operations using operations analysis techniques, and be able to develop new tactical concepts based on theory and exercise reconstruction and analysis.
  6. Systems Analysis: The graduate will understand the basic principles of systems analysis as a basis for making key decisions on force requirements, weapon systems, and other defense problems.
  7. Practice: The graduate will have gained experience working on all aspects of an analytical study, and will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent analytical studies and proficiency in presenting the results both orally and in writing.

Energy ESRs

  1. The graduate will have the ability to apply Energy principles as well as knowledge from Operations Analysis to the development and implementation of cost-effective energy technology development and acquisition programs throughout DON and DOD.
  2. The graduate will be able to analyze the strengths and weaknesses as well as cost and logistics implications of new energy technical proposals and suggest alternatives which recognize the potential impact on DOD/DON programs and objectives.
  3. The graduate will understand and be able to apply a range of Operations Analysis techniques (e.g., risk assessment and impact analysis) to RDT&E programs for platforms, systems and equipment that produce or consume energy.
  4. The graduate will have the ability to use and understand Energy systems in operations and logistics problem solving and cost analysis efforts specifically as they relate to existing and proposed DON/DOD Energy programs.
  5. The officer will be capable of understanding and evaluating the utility of Energy systems, technology, and programs currently employed by DON/DOD. Probability, Statistics, and Data Analysis: The graduate will be well-versed in the fundamentals of probability, statistics and data analysis for application to modeling, simulation, and analysis of military decision problems.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Energy Subject Matter Expert is Director, Energy and Environmental Readiness Division (N45), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Operations Analysis sponsor is Director, Assessment Division (N81), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. ESR approval authority is Director, Total Force Training and Education (N15), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. (OA-E Curriculum Review conducted 21 February 2013.)

Operations Analysis - Curriculum 360

Program Officer

Jeffrey F. Hyink, CAPT, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 226

(831) 656-3094, DSN 756-3094

FAX (831) 656-2595

jfhyink@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Ronald D. Fricker, Jr.

Glasgow Hall, Room 275

(831) 656-3048, DSN 756-3048

FAX (831) 656-2595

rdfricke@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Operations Analysis (OA) curriculum was founded by the Navy in 1951, in order to retain, develop, and promulgate the methods of Operations Research (OR) that were used so successfully in World War II. OR is the science of helping people and organizations make better decisions. More formally, it is the development and application of mathematical models, statistical analyses, simulations, analytical reasoning, and common sense to the understanding and improvement of real-world operations. Improvement can be measured by the minimization of cost, maximization of efficiency, or optimization of other relevant measures of effectiveness. Practitioners are called on to advise military and civilian decision makers on the allocation of scarce resources, the selection of new equipment and processes, and the optimal deployment of given resources to achieve required missions.

Mathematics, probability, statistics, economics, human factors, and optimization supply the theoretical background for analyzing alternative choices in tactical and strategic warfare, and in planning, budgeting, and procurement of systems and forces. The student learns computational methods and develops skills to identify relevant information, formulate decision criteria, and select alternatives. This education enhances performance in all duties throughout a military career including operational billets, technical management assignments, and policy-making positions.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of mathematics through single variable differential and integral calculus with above-average grades is considered minimal preparation. Students without these quantitative prerequisites will be accepted in cases where their undergraduate records indicate that they are exceptional students and there are other indicators of potential. An academic profile code (APC) of 325 is required. Waivers may be obtained with a one-quarter refresher.

Entry Date

The Operations Analysis course of study (eight quarters including JPME) begins with entry dates in March and September. In general, students attend a one-quarter mathematics “refresher” prior to entering the OA curriculum. This refresher sequence begins in January or July, for the March or September start dates, respectively. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curricular program as well as Service Intermediate-level PME and Phase I Joint PME credit.

Master of Science in Applied Science

Students with acceptable academic backgrounds may enter a program leading to a degree in Applied Science with a major in Operations Research. The program of each student seeking this degree must contain a minimum of 20 quarter-hours in operations research at the graduate level, including work at the 4000 level. Additionally, the program must contain a minimum of 12 graduate quarter-hours in an approved sequence of courses outside the Department of Operations Research. A total minimum of 12 quarter-hours at the 4000 level, plus an acceptable thesis, is required. This program provides depth and diversity through specially arranged course sequences to meet the needs of the Navy and the interests of the individual. The Department Chairman's approval is required for all programs leading to this degree. Applications to include this degree in dual master's programs will not be approved.

Master of Science in Operations Research

The Master of Science in Operations Research degree requires:

Doctor of Philosophy in Operations Research

The department offers the Doctor of Philosophy in Operations Research degree. The program begins with advanced course work guided by the student's doctoral committee and leading to qualifying examinations in optimization, statistics, and stochastic processes as well as completion of a minor field of study outside of operations research. The primary emphasis then shifts to the student's research program, culminating in the Ph.D. dissertation.

An applicant to the Ph.D. program who is not already a student at NPS should submit transcripts of previous academic and professional work, plus results of a current Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test, to the Director of Admissions, Code 01C3, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943-5100. Detailed admission procedures may vary depending on the individual's location and position. However, in all cases, the student must fulfill the general school requirements for the doctoral degree. Residency for this program generally requires three years beyond completion of a master's degree.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as an Operations Analysis Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 3211P and JPME Phase I education certification for students whose orders include the extra quarter for JPME. The community manager for the OA subspecialty is the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Assessment Division (OPNAV N81).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Defense Resources Management OPNAV Analyst

JCS Analyst Director, OPS Research: SACLANT

Assistant Staff OPS and PLANS: COMCARGRU Staff OPS and PLANS: COMTHIRDFLT

BUPERS OSD Analyst

OPS Analyst: Naval War College Instructor: NPS

Cost Analyst Warfare Analyst

Typical Course of Study (Naval Warfare Option)

Quarter 1

MA1118

(4-0)

Multivariable Calculus

MA3042

(4-0)

Linear Algebra

OA2801

(4-1)

Computational Methods for Operations Research

OA3101

(4-1)

Probability

Quarter 2

OA3102

(4-2)

Statistics

OA3201

(4-0)

Linear Programming

OA3301

(4-0)

Stochastic Models I

OA3304

(4-0)

Decision Theory

Quarter 3

OA3103

(4-1)

Data Analysis

OA3302

(4-0)

Simulation Modeling

OA4202

(4-0)

Network Flows and Graphs

OA4301

(4-0)

Stochastic Models II

Quarter 4

OA4201

(4-0)

Nonlinear Programming

OA4106

(3-1)

Advanced Data Analysis

OA4333

(4-0)

Simulation Analysis

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

Quarter 5 (First eight weeks)

OA3602

(4-1)

Search Theory and Detection

OA4655

(4-0)

Introduction to
Joint Combat Modeling

OA4801

(3-2)

Spreadsheet Modeling for
Military Operations Research

(Last three weeks)

Experience Tour/Thesis Research

Quarter 6

OAXXXX

 

Elective

OA4602

(4-0)

Joint Campaign Analysis

OA4656

(4-0)

Studies in Defense and Military OR

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 7

OAXXXX

 

Elective

OA3401

(3-1)

Human Factors in Systems Design

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for
Operations Analysis Students

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Operations Analysis - Curriculum 360
Subspecialty Code: 3211P

  1. Basics: The graduate will possess the mathematical and computer programming skills required to support graduate study in operations research and have the ability to use computers as a tool to aid in analysis.
  2. Probability, Statistics, and Data Analysis: The graduate will be well-versed in the fundamentals of probability, statistics and data analysis for application to modeling, simulation, and analysis of military decision problems.
  3. Optimization: The graduate will be able to formulate and solve a wide variety of optimization problems and also be conversant with the major uses of such models in DoD and the private sector.
  4. Stochastic Modeling: The graduate will be able to formulate and solve problems involving stochastic processes (processes with uncertainty over time) and also be familiar with the major applications of such models.
  5. Simulation: The graduate will be able to construct and utilize simulations of combat and other processes that evolve in time, and will be able to deal with statistical issues associated with the need for replication.
  6. Analysis of Military Operations: The graduate will be familiar with U.S./allied and potential enemy capabilities, doctrine, tactical and logistical support concepts. The graduate will be able to model and analyze military operations using operations analysis techniques, and be able to develop new tactical concepts based on theory and exercise reconstruction and analysis.
  7. Systems Analysis: The graduate will understand the basic principles of systems analysis as a basis for making key decisions on force requirements, weapon systems, and other defense problems.
  8. Practice: The graduate will have gained experience working on all aspects of an analytical study, and will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent analytical studies and proficiency in presenting the results both orally and in writing.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Curriculum sponsor is Director, Assessment Division (N81), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. ESR approval authority is Director, Total Force Training and Education (N15), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. (OA Curriculum Review conducted 21 February 2013.)

Joint Operational Logistics - Curriculum 361

Program Officer

Walter C. DeGrange, CDR, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 254

(831) 656-3026, DSN 756-3026

FAX (831) 656-2595

wcdegran@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steven E. Pilnick, Ph.D.

Code OR/Ps, Glasgow Hall, Room 291

(831) 656-2283, DSN 756-2283

FAX (831) 656-2595

spilnick@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This program provides education in mathematics, probability and statistics, physical science, economics, logistics, and computer science. These disciplines supply the theoretical background for planning and analysis of naval and joint logistics.

The course of study develops skills in computational capability, identifying relevant information, generating decision criteria, and selecting alternatives. This education enhances performance in all duties throughout a military career, including operational billets, technical management assignments, and policy-making positions.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Completion of mathematics through single variable differential and integral calculus with above-average grades is considered minimal preparation. Students without these quantitative prerequisites will be accepted in cases where their undergraduate records indicate that they are exceptional students and there are other indicators of potential. An academic profile code (APC) of 325 is required. Waivers may be obtained with a one-quarter refresher.

Entry Date

Joint Operational Logistics (JOL) is a seven-quarter course of study (eight quarters including JPME) with entry dates in March and September. If needed, students attend a one-quarter mathematics “refresher” prior to entering the JOL curriculum. The refresher sequence begins in January or July, for the March or September start dates, respectively. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Operations Research degree are met en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curriculum.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as an Operational Logistics Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 3212P. The community manager for this subspecialty is CNO N4, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Fleet Readiness and Logistics).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Joint Chiefs of Staff: Joint Logistics Planning, Mobility Analyst

OPNAV: Operational Logistics Analyst, Logistics Assessment

Fleet Forces Command: Ordnance Planning Analyst

Commander Pacific Fleet: Logistics Plans Officer

Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe: Logistics Plans Officer

TRANSCOM: Operations and Plans Officer, Sealift Analyst

Afloat Staffs: Logistics Planning Officer

Typical Course of Study (with JPME)

Quarter 0 (Refresher, if needed)

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus I

MA1114

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus II

MA1025

(4-0)

Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning

OA1600

(2-2)

Introduction to Operations Analysis I

Quarter 1

MA1118

(4-0)

Multivariable Calculus

MA3042

(4-0)

Linear Algebra

OA2801

(4-1)

Computational Methods for Operations Research

OA3101

(4-1)

Probability

Quarter 2

OA3102

(4-1)

Statistics

OA3611

(4-0)

Principles of Operational Logistics

OA3201

(4-1)

Linear Programming

OA3301

(4-0)

Stochastic Models I

Quarter 3

OA3103

(4-1)

Data Analysis

OA4202

(4-0)

Network Flows and Graphs

OA4301

(4-0)

Stochastic Models II

OA3302

(4-0)

Simulation Modeling

Quarter 4

OA4106

(3-1)

Advanced Data Analysis

OA4333

(4-0)

Simulation Analysis

OA3501

(4-0)

Inventory I

OA4201

(4-0)

Nonlinear Programming

Quarter 5 (First eight weeks)

OA4613

(4-0)

Energy Logistics in Warfare Operations

OA4655

(4-0)

Joint Combat Modeling

OA4801

(3-2)

Spreadsheet Modeling for
Military Operations Research

(Last three weeks)

Experience Tour/Thesis Research

Quarter 6

OA4611

(4-0)

Joint and Combined Logistics

OA4656

(4-0)

Studies in Defense and Military OR

OA3304

(4-0)

Decision Theory

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 7

OA4xxx

(4-0)

Elective

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

NW3275

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Operations - Part 1

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 8

OA4602

(4-0)

Joint Campaign Analysis

NW3285

(4-0)

National Security Decision Making

NW3276

(2-2)

Joint Maritime Operations - Part 2

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Operational Logistics - Curriculum 361
Subspecialty Code 3212P

  1. Basics: The graduate will possess the mathematical and computing skills to support quantitative analysis.
  2. Modeling Uncertainty: The graduate will be well-versed in probability and statistics and their application to operations research (OR) problems.
  3. Optimization: The graduate will be able to formulate and solve a wide variety of optimization problems and also be conversant with the major uses of such models in DoD and the private sector.
  4. Stochastic Modeling: The graduate will be able to formulate and solve problems involving stochastic processes (processes with uncertainty over time) and be familiar with the major applications of such models.
  5. Simulation: The graduate will be able to construct and utilize discrete event and Monte Carlo simulations of combat and other processes, particularly logistics-themed, which evolve in time and space, and will be able to deal with analysis issues associated with stochastic simulation models.
  6. Analysis of Military Operations: The graduate will be familiar with U.S., allied, and potential enemy capabilities, and will be able to model and analyze joint military operations using OR techniques. The graduate will also be able to develop and evaluate new tactical and logistic concepts for a variety of operations ranging from humanitarian assistance/disaster relief to combat.
  7. Joint Logistics: The graduate will understand naval and joint logistics systems; joint planning systems; military and commercial transportation systems of all types; supply systems; maintenance, engineering, and health services; and the use of analysis in all aspects of planning for the logistics support of joint forces.
  8. Systems Analysis: The graduate will understand the basic principles and applications of system analysis, as a basis for making key decisions on force requirements, weapon systems, and other defense problems.
  9. Joint Military Operations, Strategy and Planning: Graduates will be prepared to transition from specialized technical duties to assignments that require a broad understanding of national policy and strategy, resource allocation and management, and joint and combined operations.
  10. Joint OL Practice: The graduate will have gained experience working on all aspects of an analytical study in the field of joint operational logistics. Specifically, the graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent analytical studies, and proficiency in presenting the results both orally and in writing.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Curriculum sponsor is Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics (N4), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. ESR approval authority is Director, Total Force, Training and Education (N15), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. (Joint OL Curriculum Review conducted 28 July 2010.)

Human Systems Integration - Curriculum 359 (DL), Curriculum 362 (RES)

Curriculum 359 (DL)

Program Officer

Lawrence G. Shattuck, Ph.D.

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 234

(831) 656-2473, DSN 756-2473

FAX (831) 656-2595

Lgshattu@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Diana K. Kim

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 221

(831) 656-3134, DSN 756-3134

FAX (831) 656-2595

dkkim@nps.edu

Curriculum 362 (RES)

Program Officer

Walter C. DeGrange, CDR, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 254

(831) 656-3026, DSN 756-3026

FAX (831) 656-2595

wcdegran@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Lawrence G. Shattuck, Ph.D.

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 234

(831) 656-2473, DSN 756-2473

FAX (831) 656-2595

Lgshattu@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Human Systems Integration (HSI) is an interdisciplinary program that emphasizes human considerations as a priority in systems design and acquisition, to reduce life cycle costs, and improve total system performance. HSI has been divided into several distinct domains that include human factors engineering, manpower, personnel, training, human survivability, health hazards, system safety, and habitability. HSI is based on the understanding that people (operators, maintainers, and support personnel) are critical elements of the system and that a human-centered design perspective promotes system effectiveness, safety, and cost savings. This degree will provide students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to be effective leaders in the assessment, design, testing, and management of a total human machine system throughout its life cycle.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades is required. Students without these quantitative prerequisites will be accepted in cases where their undergraduate records indicate that they are exceptional students and there are other indicators of potential. An academic profile code (APC) of 335 is required for the resident program, and 345 for the distance learning program.

Entry Date

Human Systems Integration is an eight-quarter course of study (including Joint Professional Military Education (JPME)) with entry in the Fall Quarter. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Master of Human Systems Integration

The degree of Master of Human Systems Integration (HSI) requires:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 40 quarter-hours of graduate-level courses with:
    1. At least 20 quarter-hours of 4000-level courses, and
    2. Human Systems Integration core courses and a series of supporting courses, including coursework in HSI domains, Systems Engineering, Defense Acquisition, Cost Estimation, and Probability and Statistics, all of which are set in a matrix approved by the Chairman, Department of Operations Research.
  2. Students are required to demonstrate mastery of Human Systems Integration practice through satisfactory completion of a two-quarter capstone project approved by the Chairman, Department of Operations Research. The quarter-hours earned in the Capstone project are applied towards satisfying the minimum graduate level quarter-hours for the degree.

Master of Science in Human Systems Integration

The degree of Master of Science in Human Systems Integration requires:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 40 quarter-hours of graduate-level courses with:
    1. At least 20 quarter-hours of 4000 level courses.
    2. An elective sequence approved by the Chairman, Department of Operations Research.
  2. Submission of an acceptable thesis on a subject previously approved by the Chairman, Department of Operations Research.

Subspecialty (RES)

Navy P- Code: 4600P

Typical Course of Study- Curriculum 359 (DL)

(Distance Learning)

Quarter 1

OA3411

(3-0)

Introduction to HSI

MN3301

(4-0)

Acquisition of Defense Systems

Quarter 2

OA3412

(3-0)

HSI in the DoD Acquisition Lifecycle

SE3100

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

Quarter 3

OA3413

(3-1)

HSI Tools, Tradeoffs, and Processes

OA3401

(3-1)

Human Factors in System Design

Quarter 4

OA4414

(4-0)

HSI Capstone Seminar

OS3111

(3-1)

Probability and Statistics for HSI & MOVES

Quarter 5

OA4401

(4-0)

Individual Performance & Personnel Considerations

OS3112

(4-2)

Statistics and Design
of Experiments

Quarter 6

OA4406

(3-1)

Survivability, Habitability, Environmental Safety, and Occupational Health

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

Quarter 7

OA4402

(3-1)

Training & Simulation

OA4408

 

(3-1)

Macroergonomics and Organizational Behavior in Human Systems Integration

Quarter 8

OA4603

(4-0)

Test & Evaluation

OA4415

 

(4-0)

HSI Case Studies & Applications (Capstone Part 2)

Typical Course of Study- Curriculum 362 (RES)

(Navy, Marine Corps)

(* if the Summer refresher is not taken)

Summer Refresher

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus I

MA1114

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus II with Matrix Algebra

GB3012

(3-0)

Communications for Managers

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

Quarter 1

OA3411

(3-0)

Introduction to HSI

OS3111

(3-1)

Probability and Statistics for HSI & MOVES

OA3401

(3-1)

Human Factors in System Design

SE3100

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

Quarter 2

OA3402

(3-1)

Research Methods for Performance Assessment

OS3113

(4-2)

Data Analysis for HSI and MOVES

MN3331

(5-1)

Systems Acquisition & Program Management

SI3400

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Engineering Project Management

Quarter 3

OA3412

(3-0)

HSI in the DoD Acquisition Lifecycle

OS3112

(4-2)

Statistics and Design
of Experiments

OA4407

(3-1

Anthropometry and Biomechanics

SE3302

(3-2)

System Sustainability

Quarter 4

OA4406

(3-1)

Survivability, Habitability, Environmental Safety, and Occupational Health

OA4603

(4-0)

Test & Evaluation

OA4109

(4-2)

Survey Research Methods

SE3303

(3-2)

System Assessment Strategy and War

NW3230*

(4-2)

Strategy and War

Quarter 5

OA3413

(3-1)

HSI Tools, Tradeoffs, and Processes

MN4115

(4-0)

Foundations of Education and Learning in DoD Organizations

OA4401

(4-0)

Individual Performance & Personnel Considerations

NW3285

(4-0)

National Security Decision Making

Quarter 6

OS4701

(4-0)

Techniques in Manpower Modeling

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

OA4408

 

(3-1)

Macroergonomics and Organizational Behavior in Human Systems Integration

MV4002

(4-1)

Simulation and Training

Quarter 7

MN3111

(4-0)

Analysis of Human Resource Management

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for Operations Analysis Students

NW3275

 

(4-0)

 

Joint Maritime Operations -
Part 1

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for Operations Analysis Students

Quarter 8

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for Operations Analysis Students

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for
Operations Analysis Students

OA4414

(4-0)

HSI Capstone Seminar

NW3276

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Operations -
Part 2

Typical Course of Study

(Army, International, Civilians, Air Force)

Summer Refresher

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus I

MA1114

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus II with Matrix Algebra

GB3012

(3-0)

Communications for Managers

Quarter 1

OA3411

(3-0)

Introduction to HSI

OS3111

(3-1)

Probability and Statistics for HSI & MOVES

OA3401

(3-1)

Human Factors in System Design

SE3100

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

Quarter 2

OA3402

(3-1)

Research Methods for Performance Assessment

OS3113

(4-2)

Data Analysis for HSI and MOVES

MN3331

(5-1)

Systems Acquisition & Program Management

SI3400

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Engineering Project Management

Quarter 3

OA3412

(3-0)

HSI in the DoD Acquisition Lifecycle

OS3112

(4-2)

Statistics and Design
of Experiments

OA4407

(3-1)

Anthropometry and Biomechanics

SE3302

(3-2)

System Sustainability

Quarter 4

OA4406

(3-1)

Survivability, Habitability, Environmental Safety, and Occupational Health

OA4603

(4-0)

Test & Evaluation

OA4109

(4-2)

Survey Research Methods

SE3303

(3-2)

System Assessment Strategy and

Quarter 5

OA3413

(3-1)

HSI Tools, Tradeoffs, and Processes

MN4115

(4-0)

Foundations of Education and Learning in DoD Organizations

OA4401

(4-0)

Individual Performance & Personnel Considerations

Quarter 6

OS4701

(4-0)

Techniques in Manpower Modeling

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

OA4408

 

(3-1)

Macroergonomics and Organizational Behavior in Human Systems Integration

MV4002

(4-1)

Simulation and Training

Quarter 7

MN3111

(4-0)

Analysis of Human Resource Management

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for Operations Analysis Students

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for Operations Analysis Students

Quarter 8

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for Operations Analysis Students

OA0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research for Operations Analysis Students

OA4414

(4-0)

HSI Capstone Seminar

Provisional Learning Outcomes

Human Systems Integration - Curriculum 359 (DL)

The goal of the distance learning program is to educate eligible personnel within the federal government and defense contractor organizations in the discipline of Human Systems Integration (HSI). Graduates of this program will possess the skills necessary to function as practitioners of HSI.

  1. SYSTEMS APPROACH:  Graduates will be able to positively influence the activities the Program Management (PM), Systems Engineering (SE), and Test & Evaluation (T&E) communities as they function within the Department of Defense (DoD) Acquisition Lifecycle.
  2. HSI DOMAIN KNOWLEDGE:  Graduates will demonstrate a basic knowledge of all HSI domains:  Human Factors Engineering, Manpower, Personnel, Training, Environmental Safety and Occupational Health, Survivability, and Habitability.  Graduates will be familiar with the primary approaches and techniques used by each HSI domain.
  3. HUMAN PERFORMANCE:  Graduates will be able to apply their knowledge of the cognitive and physiological capabilities and constraints on human performance in operational settings.  Graduates will be able to assess factors that affect human performance such as attention, memory, workload, situation awareness, stress, fatigue, and human error.
  4. IMPLEMENTING HSI TRADEOFFS:  Graduates will be able to conduct elementary tradeoffs across HSI domains, as well as tradeoffs involving engineering, acquisition, and T&E disciplines.  They will be able to articulate the impacts and risks associated with those tradeoffs to technical and non-technical audiences.
  5. ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES:  Graduates will be able to conduct fundamental quantitative and qualitative research in both field and laboratory settings within the context of the defense acquisition process.
  6. MODELING and SIMULATION:  Graduates will be familiar with basic modeling and simulation (M&S) techniques to explore tradeoffs across HSI domains and tradeoffs involving engineering, acquisition, and T&E disciplines.

Provisional Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Human Systems Integration - Curriculum 362 (RES)

The goal of this curriculum is to educate Naval Officers of the United States Navy in Human Systems Integration. The delivery method is an in-resident course at the Naval Postgraduate School. Human Systems Integration (HSI) acknowledges that the human is a critical component in any complex system. It is an interdisciplinary approach that makes explicit the underlying tradeoffs across the HSI domains, and other engineering disciplines, logistics, acquisition, and T&E, optimizing total system performance while minimizing total ownership costs. The graduate of this program will possess the skills necessary to function as a practitioner in HSI.

HSI DOMAIN KNOWLEDGE: Graduates will possess a thorough background in all HSI domains: Human Factors Engineering, Manpower, Personnel, Training, Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health, Survivability, and Habitability. Graduates will understand the basis for the decisions made by individual domain specialists and will be familiar with the primary approaches and techniques used by each of the HSI domains.

  1. ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Graduates will be able to perform tradeoff analysis across domains and other engineering disciplines, logistics, acquisition, and T&E, and to conduct empirical analysis within the domains of human systems integration. They will be able to apply, at the right place and at the right time, these analytical methods and tools in both field and laboratory settings within the context of the defense acquisition process.
  2. MODELING and SIMULATION: Graduates will be able to apply Modeling and Simulation (M&S) techniques to explore HSI domain tradeoffs and tradeoffs within other engineering disciplines, logistics, acquisition, and T&E. They will demonstrate the ability to apply M&S techniques within and across the HSI domains to facilitate the development, T&E, operations, and sustainment of military systems.
  3. HUMAN PERFORMANCE: HSI maintains that the human is a critical component in any complex system. Graduates will understand the basis of both individual and team performance in military settings including human information processing, perception, cognition, decision making, and motor control. Graduates will understand current theory and practice in assessing cognitive factors that affect human performance such as attention, memory, situation awareness, stress, fatigue, and motivation. Graduates will understand current scientific knowledge of factors affecting human performance and human error.
  4. SYSTEMS APPROACH: Graduates will comprehend the principles and practices of the fields of PM, SE, and logistics, and T&E as related to the DoD Acquisition Lifecycle. Knowledge of HSI influences on PM, SE, and logistics, and T&E will enable graduates to positively influence the DoD Acquisition Lifecycle at appropriate times and in the right manner.
  5. IMPLEMENTING HSI TRADEOFFS: Graduates will learn techniques to develop domain level trades, trades within other engineering disciplines, logistics, acquisition, and T&E, impacts, and risk assessments, and the ability to negotiate and communicate to both technical and non-technical audiences. Graduates will understand the political, organizational, social, and economic issues associated with integrating human-machine systems into organizational cultures and environments.
  6. JOINT PROFESSIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION: Students will be encouraged to complete the Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) program. This sequence of courses develops an understanding of warfighting within the context of operational art. Topics include: national military capabilities and command structure, joint and service doctrine, joint planning and execution, and joint multinational forces and integration at the operational level of war. JPME includes coursework in wargaming designed to develop an appreciation of the art of war.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Approved as l ESRs; N15 letter "REPORT OF CURRICULUM REVIEW OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION (362) AND CERTIFICATE IN HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION (262)."

Master of Systems Analysis - (DL) - Curriculum 363

Program Officer

Jeffrey F. Hyink, CAPT, USN

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 226

(831) 656-3094, DSN 756-3094

FAX (831) 656-2595

jfhyink@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steven E. Pilnick, Ph.D.

Code OR/PS, Glasgow Hall, Room 291

(831) 656-2283, DSN 756-2283

FAX (831) 656-2595

spilnick@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Master of Systems Analysis (MSA) program is a distance learning, graduate degree program, designed to meet the needs of the Navy and other services in the Department of Defense (DoD) for technical graduate education in systems analysis as a basis for aiding key decisions on force requirements, weapon systems, and other defense matters. Students acquire foundation skills and hands-on experience in all aspects of analytical studies, which includes the skills to formulate problems, use the analytical process to design study requirements, highlight critical assumptions, recognize strengths and weaknesses of applied analytical methodologies, and evaluate study recommendations.

This program is especially tailored to students whose career pattern will not allow them to get away for a full-time, graduate education program. The entire degree program can be completed at the student's current duty station. This program consists of a blend of approximately 50% web-based, online instruction, and 50% synchronous distance learning, mainly video-tele-education (VTE). The web-based instruction is paced week-to-week by the instructors, but the students have great flexibility to do their course work at times of their choosing during each week. The synchronous classes, mainly VTE, meet at a scheduled time, once per week, during the workday, with the agreement of the student's current command. Some of the synchronous classes use a web-based interface known as Elluminate Live in lieu of VTE.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree is required. Completion of mathematics through single variable differential and integral calculus is considered minimal preparation. An academic profile code (APC) of 335 is required.

Entry Dates

The MSA is an eight-quarter course of study with start dates in late March/early April and late September/early October. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Master of Systems Analysis

The Master of Systems Analysis degree requires:

Program Description

The MSA program is a 24-month, part-time program. Students take two courses per quarter, for eight quarters. The curriculum consists of four blocks. Two of the blocks comprise stand-alone, web-based sequences. One is a four-course sequence leading to a Certificate in Systems Analysis, the second online sequence is a track approved by the student's service sponsor in a particular defense systems area in which systems analysis may be applied. The other two blocks round out the master's program with additional systems analysis core courses and a sequence of systems analysis case studies and projects that are an approved equivalent of a master's thesis. All students who successfully complete the distance-learning course of study will receive:

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum is designed to qualify an officer as an Operations Research Analysis Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 3210P. The curriculum sponsor is Director, Assessment Division (N81), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

OPNAV staff

JCS staff

Fleet staff

Type Commander staff

Battle Group staff

OSD staff

Typical Course of Study (Navy URL Track)

Quarter 1, Spring/Fall

OS2080

(3-0)

Probability and Statistics I (SA Cert)

MO1180

(3-2)

Topics in Mathematics for
Systems Analysis

Quarter 2, Summer/Winter

OS3380

(3-1)

Combat Systems Simulation
(SA Cert)

OS3080

(3-0)

Probability and Statistics II

Quarter 3, Fall/Spring

OS3680

(4-0)

Naval Tactical Analysis (SA Cert)

OA4702

(4-0)

Cost Estimation

Quarter 4, Winter/Summer

OS4680

(4-0)

Naval Systems Analysis (SA Cert)

OS3211

(4-0)

Systems Optimization

SA Certificate Award

Quarter 5, Spring/Fall

OS4011

(3-2)

Risk Benefit Analysis

MN4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy (DRM track)

Quarter 6, Summer/Winter

OS3081

(3-0)

Systems Analysis Cases I
(MSA Thesis Equivalent)

MN3510

(3-0)

Defense Financial
Management Practice (DRM track)

Quarter 7, Fall/Spring

OS3082

(3-0)

Systems Analysis Cases II
(MSA Thesis Equivalent)

MN3221

(3-0)

Systems Acquisition and
Program Management I (DRM track)

Quarter 8, Winter/Summer

OS4083

(3-2)

Systems Analysis Cases III
(MSA Thesis Equivalent)

MN3222

(3-0)

Systems Acquisition and
Program Management II (DRM track)

Graduation week at NPS

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Master of Systems Analysis (MSA) - Curriculum 363
Subspecialty Code: 3210P

  1. Systems Analysis: The graduate of this curriculum will understand and be able to apply the basic principles of systems analysis as a basis for aiding key decisions on force requirements, weapon systems, and other defense matters. The following specific Educational Skill Requirements support this high-level objective.
  2. Basics: The graduate will possess the mathematical skills required to support graduate study in systems analysis.
  3. Uncertainty Fundamentals: The graduate will be well versed in uncertainty fundamentals for systems analysis, including applications of probability, statistics, data analysis, and modeling uncertainty.
  4. Simulation: The graduate will be able to construct and utilize Monte Carlo simulations of combat and other processes that evolve in time, and will be able to deal with statistical issues associated with the need for replication.
  5. Tactical Analysis: The graduate will be able to apply operations analysis methods to tactical and operational problems, including tactical decision analysis, search and detection, and weapons effectiveness.
  6. Cost Analysis: The graduate will understand the methods and practice of cost analysis including various cost models, with particular emphasis in the relationship of effectiveness models and measures to cost, and applications in cost-benefit analysis.
  7. Risk-Benefit Analysis: The graduate will be able to apply the principles of probabilistic risk assessment in the context of systems analysis decision problems. This includes a framework for balancing risks and benefits, and analysis under conditions of large financial and technological uncertainties.
  8. Optimization: The graduate will be able to formulate and solve a wide variety of optimization problems with particular emphasis on applications in optimum allocation of scarce resources and multi-year capital budgeting.
  9. Practice: The graduate will have gained experience in all aspects of analytical studies, including review, critique, and oversight of the work of others, as well as participation in the conduct of an analytical study. Review, critique, and oversight include the ability to highlight critical assumptions, recognize strengths and weaknesses of applied analytical methodologies, and evaluate study recommendations. Practice in the design and conduct of an analytical study includes the skills to formulate problems, use the analytical process to define study requirements, and apply appropriate analytical methodologies. Practice also includes demonstrating proficiency in presenting results both orally and in writing.
  10. Systems Analysis Context: The graduate will have completed an approved option sequence in Defense Resource Management, or another approved option sequence in a particular defense systems area in which systems analysis may be applied.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Curriculum sponsor is Director, Assessment Division (N81), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. ESR approval authority is Director, Total Force Training and Education (N15), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. (MSA Curriculum Review conducted 21 February 2013.)

Master of Cost Estimating and Analysis (MCEA) - (Distance Learning) - Curriculum 379

Program Manager

Daniel Nussbaum, Ph.D.

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 242

(831) 656-2387, DSN 756-2387

FAX (831) 656-2595

danussba@nps.edu

Greg K. Mislick, LCOL, USMC (Ret.)

Code OR, Glasgow Hall, Room 202

(831) 656-3113, DSN 756-3113

FAX (831) 656-2595

gmislick@nps.edu

Program Officer and Academic Associate

Kevin J. Maher, CDR, USN (Ret.)

Code OR/Mk, Glasgow Hall, Room 227

(831) 656-2691, DSN 756-2691

kjmaher@nps.edu

Program Description

The Master of Cost Estimating and Analysis (MCEA) is a 24-month, distance learning graduate degree program designed to increase the accuracy and proficiency of DoD cost estimates and cost estimators. This curriculum is sponsored by Naval Sea Systems Command as a joint effort between NPS and the Air Force Institute of Technology. Students will learn cost estimating techniques commonly used in both DoD and industry, and acquire foundation skills and hands-on experience in all aspects of cost estimation, including shipbuilding, aircraft, software, and many other areas. Students take two courses per quarter for eight quarters. Case studies and a capstone project will complete the program. This program blends web-based, online instruction, with video tele-education (VTE), and is especially tailored to students whose careers will not allow them to get away for a full-time graduate education program. While web-based courses are paced week-to-week by the instructors, students have the flexibility to do their coursework at times of their choosing during each week. The VTE classes meet at a pre-determined time, once per week for three hours during the workday.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree is required. Recent completion (within five years) of mathematics through single variable differential and integral calculus is considered minimal preparation. An academic profile code (APC) of 235 is required. For applicants with an undergraduate GPA below 2.7, a waiver will be considered depending on work experience and attaining a minimum GRE score of 550.

Entry Dates

The MCEA program is an eight-quarter course of study with start dates in late March. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Manager for this curriculum.

Degree

The Master of Cost Estimating and Analysis is a professional degree awarded for completing a curriculum focused on the practice of the profession rather than the more general arts or sciences behind the profession. It is analogous to the professional focus of an MBA (Master of Business Administration) compared to the more academic focus of an MS (Master of Science) in Management Science.

The Master of Cost Estimating and Analysis degree requires:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 40 quarter-hours of graduate-level courses with:
    1. At least 15 quarter-hours of 4000-level courses.
    2. Cost Estimating and Analysis core courses and a series of supporting courses in Probability, Statistics, Defense Acquisition, Financial Management, and Systems Engineering, all of which are set in a matrix approved by the Chairman, Department of Operations Research.
  2. Students are required to demonstrate mastery of Cost Estimating and Analysis practice through satisfactory completion of a Capstone Project approved by the Chairman, Department of Operations Research. The quarter-hours earned in the Capstone project are applied towards satisfying the minimum graduate level quarter-hours for the degree.

Required Courses

Quarter 1, Spring

OS2080

(3-0)

Probability and Statistics I

MN3301

(4-0)

Acquisition of Defense Systems

Quarter 2, Summer

OS3080

(3-0)

Probability and Statistics II

OS3006

(3-0)

Operations Research for Cost Analysts

Quarter 3, Fall

MN4053

(4-0)

Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy

OS3701/ Cost 510 (AFIT)

(3-0)

Cost Estimation I: Methods and Techniques

Quarter 4, Winter

MN3510

(3-0)

Defense Financial Management Practice

OS4702/ Cost 520 (AFIT)

(3-0)

Cost Estimation II: Advanced Concepts in Cost Estimating

Quarter 5, Spring

OS4012/ Cost 610 (AFIT)

(3-0)

Cost Estimation III: Risk and Uncertainty Analysis

OS4703/ Cost 530 (AFIT)

(3-0)

Cost Estimation IV: Applied Cost Analysis

Quarter 6, Summer

SE4012/ SENG610 (AFIT)

(4-0)

Management of Advanced Systems Engineering

OS4080/ Cost 620 (AFIT)

(3-0)

Cost Estimation V: Cost Estimating and Analysis Cases

Quarter 7, Fall

SE4011/ SENG520 (AFIT)

(3-2)

Systems Engineering for Acquisition Managers

OS4081/ Cost798 (AFIT)

(3-4)

Cost Estimating and Analysis Capstone I (MCEA Thesis Equivalent)

Quarter 8, Winter

OS4013/ Cost630 (AFIT)

(4-0)

Cost Estimation VI: Decision Analysis for Cost Estimators

OS4082/ Cost798 (AFIT)

(3-4)

Cost Estimating and Analysis Capstone II (MCEA Thesis Equivalent)

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)

Master of Cost Estimating and Analysis (MCEA) - Curriculum 379

  1. Basics: The graduate will possess the mathematical skills required to support graduate study in Cost Analysis/Cost Estimating.
  2. Cost Analysis: The graduate will understand the methods and practice of cost analysis including various cost models, with particular emphasis in the relationship of effectiveness models and measures to cost, and applications in cost-benefit analysis.
  3. Statistics and Probability: The graduate will have a firm understanding of statistics and probability analysis and be able to apply that knowledge in the development of cost estimating relationships. The graduate will also be able to correctly interpret statistical measures of any data set.
  4. Uncertainty Fundamentals: The graduate will be well versed in uncertainty fundamentals for cost analysis, including applications of probability, statistics, data analysis, and modeling uncertainty.
  5. Simulation: The graduate will be able to construct and utilize Monte Carlo simulations in cost estimates of cost and schedule drivers, and will be able to deal with statistical issues associated with estimating costs of programs with limited financial resources.
  6. Rates Development: The graduate will be able to construct a rate-set for direct labor, overhead, general and administrative costs, and inflation. The graduate will also be able to construct costs for various contract types, such as cost-plus, fixed-fee plus incentive, etc.
  7. Cost-Benefit Analysis: The graduate will be able to apply the principles of probabilistic cost assessment in the context of resource allocation problems. This includes a framework for balancing costs and benefits, and analysis under conditions of large financial and technological uncertainties.
  8. Optimization: The graduate will be able to formulate and solve a wide variety of optimization problems with particular emphasis on applications in optimum allocation of scarce resources and multi-year capital budgeting.
  9. Systems Engineering and Analysis: The graduate of this curriculum will understand and be able to apply the basic principles of systems analysis as a basis for aiding key decisions on force requirements, weapon systems, and other defense matters.
  10. Practice: The graduate will have gained experience in all aspects of analytical studies, including review, critique, and oversight of the work of others, as well as participation in the conduct of an analytical study. Review, critique, and oversight include the ability to highlight critical assumptions, recognize strengths and weaknesses of applied analytical methodologies, and evaluate study recommendations. Practice in the design and conduct of an analytical study includes the skills to formulate problems, use the analytical process to define study requirements, and apply appropriate analytical methodologies. Practice also includes demonstrating proficiency in presenting results both orally and in writing.
  11. Cost Analysis Context: The graduate will have completed an approved option sequence in Naval Sea Systems, Air Force Systems, Naval Air Systems, or another approved option sequence in a particular defense systems area in which systems analysis may be applied.
  12. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Certification: The graduate, through program course work, will have satisfied all DAU academic requirements for Level III Certification in Cost Estimating.

Curriculum Sponsor and ESR Approval Authority

Curriculum sponsor is Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command and Commander, Naval Air Systems Command