Cyber Academic Group

Chair

Clark Robertson, Ph.D.

Professor

Spanagel Hall room 437A

831-656-2081, DSN 756-2081

irvine@nps.edu

David L. Alderson, Associate Professor (2006), Ph.D., Stanford University, 2003.

Pablo Breuer, CDR, USN, Military Lecturer (2015), M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2008.

Raymond J. Buettner, Jr., Associate Professor (1999), Ph.D., Stanford University, 2003.

Karen Burke, Research Associate Professor (2003), M.S., Southern Illinois University, 1979.

Richard S. Cote, Senior Lecturer (2001), M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2000.

Rudy Darken, Professor (1996), Ph.D., George Washington University, 1995.

Duane T. Davis, Research Assistant Professor (2012), Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.

Dorothy Denning, Distinguished Professor (2002), Ph.D., Purdue University, 1975.

Chris Eagle, Senior Lecturer (1997), M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1995.

John D. (JD) Fulp, Senior Lecturer (2001), M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1996.

Shelly P. Gallup, Research Associate Professor (1999), Ph.D., Old Dominion University, 1998.

Ted Huffmire, Assistant Professor (2007), Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 2007.

Wade Lee Huntley, Senior Lecturer (2009), Ph.D., University of California at Berkley, 1993.

Cynthia E. Irvine, Distinguished Professor and Chair (1994), Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 1975.

Scott Jasper, Center for Civil Military Relations (2002), M.A., Naval War College, 1998, M.B.A., San Jose State University, 1988.

John McEachen, Professor (1996), Ph.D., Yale University, 1995.

Luqi, Professor (1986), Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1986.

Eric McMullen, LCDR, USN, Military Lecturer, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2013.

Thuy Nguyen, Faculty Associate-Research (2002), B.A., University of California at San Diego, 1982.

Alan Shaffer, Senior Lecturer (2016), Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2009.

Mantak Shing, Associate Professor (1988), Ph.D., Univer-sity of California at San Diego, 1981.

Pantelimon Stanica, Professor (2006), Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo, 1998.

Zachary Staples, CDR, USN, Director, Center for Cyber Warfare (2013), M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2003.

Preetha Thulasiraman, Assistant Professor (2012), Ph.D., University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, 2010.

Dan Verheul, CAPT, USN, Associate Military Professor (2012), M.A., Florida State University, 1986, M.A., Marine Corps Command and Staff College, 1999.

Lonnie Wilson, Professor Emeritus (1979), Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1973.

Brief Overview

Cyberspace is now a primary warfare area. Establishing US Tenth Fleet/Fleet Cyber Command, combined with the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance (N2N6) forms an enterprise able to address the opportunities and challenges for Cyber Systems and Operations (CSO) within the Navy’s vision for the Information Dominance Corps (IDC). Reflecting a growing cognizance of the importance of cyber operations, other elements of the U.S. military and U.S. Government, such as the Department of Homeland Security, have created similar or complementary organizations. Optimization of the military and U.S. Government value of cyber for future operations will require leaders who both understand how to defend our networks from penetration and employ cyber capabilities to ensure an advantage in future operations. Essential to this objective is a cadre of officers able to address the broad range of cyber operations: computer network attack, defense, and exploitation; cyber analysis, operations, planning and engineering; and cyber intelligence operations and analysis.

The Cyber Academic Group (CAG) is an interdisciplinary association of faculty and academic professorships representing six different academic disciplines. Established by the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) on 23 September 2011, The Cyber Academic Group has responsibility for oversight and management of the Cyber Systems and Operations curriculum. Instruction in this interdisciplinary programs is carried out by the members of this academic group and by faculty primarily from the following academic departments: Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Information Sciences.

Cyber Systems and Operations (CSO) (DL & Res) - Curriculum 326/327

Program Officer

Eric McMullen, LCDR, USN

Code CY, Glasgow East, Room 309

831-656-7980, DSN 756-2239

elmcmull@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Duane T. Davis

Code CY, Glasgow East, Room 212

831-656-2239, DSN 756-2239

dtdavi1@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The CSO curriculum uniquely prepares Officers with the educational background, problem solving, and critical thinking skills to serve in challenging Cyberspace Operations and Cyber Warfare key leadership, operational planning, systems management, and Cyber capability employment positions within the military. The program couples the factors of decision-making, operational warfare context, and technical specialization based in the disciplines of computer science, electrical engineering, and emerging Cyber academic programs. The CSO curriculum includes emphasis on means to support the Information Dominance pillars of Assured Command and Control, Battlespace Awareness, and Integrated Fires. The program directly supports Navy, USMC, and DOD goals of operating the network as a warfighting platform, delivering warfighting effects through cyberspace, creating shared situational awareness, and aiding in maturing of Cyber Mission Forces.

The CSO curriculum requires students to choose one of three available tracks following completion of the first instructional quarter. The systems and operations, computation, and engineering tracks augment a common CSO core that is administered by the Cyber Academic Group and the Computer Science, Information Sciences, and Electrical and Computer Engineering Departments. Each track is managed independently to meet all sponsor-approved educational skill requirements and culminates in the award of a degree appropriate to the track.

Requirements for Entry

This curriculum is open to officers of the U.S. Armed Forces and civilian employees of the U.S. Federal Government. A baccalaureate degree, or the equivalent, with grades resulting in an APC of at least 334, basic computer programming capability, and a general understanding of computer architectures and operating systems is required for direct entry. Applicants with demonstrated proficiency but failing meet any of these requirements may be admitted to the program but will be required to participate in the introductory quarter (Quarter 0). A TOP SECRET clearance is required with eligibility for SCI access.

Entry Date

Cyber Systems and Operations is a seven-quarter resident course of study with entry dates in March and September. DL program duration will depend upon the number of simultaneous courses taken. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer for this curriculum. An introductory quarter (Quarter 0) is available in July and January for students with non-technical backgrounds.

Degree

Students completing the CSO core matrix and track shall be eligible for the following degrees:

Systems and Operations Track (administered by the Information Sciences Department)

Master of Science in Cyber Systems and Operations

Computation Track (administered by the Computer Science Department)

Master of Science in Computer Science

Engineering Track (administered by the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department)

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering

or

Master of Science in Engineering Science (with emphasis in Electrical Engineering)

Degree Requirements

Degree requirements associated with the Computation and Engineering tracks are available under their host departments’ degree descriptions.

Program Length

Seven Quarters with JPME.

Typical Course of Study -- Fall Entry

Quarter 0

CS2020

4-2

Introduction to Programming

EC2700

4-1

Introduction to Cyber Systems

MA1113

4-0

Single-Variable Calculus

MA2025

4-1

Logic & Discrete Math

CS4924

(1-0)

CS & CSO Seminar

Quarter 1

CY3000

(3-0)

Introduction to Cyber Systems and Operations

CS3040

(4-2)

Low Level Programming I

CS3600

(4-2)

Introduction to Computer Security

EC3730

(3-2)

Cyber Network & Physical Infrastructures

CS4924

(1-0)

CS & CSO Seminar

Quarter 2

EC3760

(3-2)

Information Operations Systems

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and War

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CS4924

(1-0)

CS & CSO Seminar

Quarter 3

CY3690

(4-1)

Network Security

CY4900

(1-0)

CSO Research Topics

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

Quarter 4

CY4901

(1-0)

CSO Research Methods

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

Quarter 5

NW3275

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Operations 1

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CY9999

 

CSO Track Requirement

CY0810

(0-8)

Thesis

CS4924

(1-0)

CS & CSO Seminar

Quarter 6

EC3740

(3-2)

Reverse Engineering

CY4750

(3-2)

CSO Group Capstone

NW3276

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Operations 2

CY0810

(0-8)

Thesis

CS4924

(1-0)

CS & CSO Seminar

Quarter 7

CY4400

(3-0)

Cyber Mission Planning

NW3285

(3-2)

Theater Security Decision Making

CY0810

(0-8)

Thesis

CY0810

(0-8)

Thesis

CS4924

1-0)

CS & CSO Seminar

Curriculum Major Area Sponsor

DCNO for Information Dominance (N2/N6).

Educational Skill Requirements

1. Cyberspace Operations (CO) Foundations. Graduates of the CSO program will: have acquired knowledge of Cyber Warfare and Cyberspace Operations concepts and methodologies; demonstrate a proficient application of the technical dimensions of Cyberspace Operations; and be able to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate management, engineering, and operational approaches to solve complex problems within cyber warfare. This foundation must provide graduates who possess the educational skills to:

2. Technical Foundations. Graduates will be able to apply critical thinking, fundamental mathematical, computer science, and engineering concepts underpinning Cyberspace Operations in an operational context. In particular, graduates will be able to employ Cyberspace Operations concepts to solve operationally relevant problems. This education will be founded in the following technical areas: computer architecture; operating systems; virtualization; networking, mobile, and wireless technologies; cyber physical systems and industrial control systems; computer and network security; computer programming; reverse engineering and digital forensics; data analytics; probability; statistics; and signals operations.

3. Military Application. Officers will be able to analyze cyber requirements within military operations and synthesize and evaluate courses of action that include the use of Cyber capabilities within the full range of military capabilities (kinetic to non-kinetic). These skills will be reinforced through the use of the Joint Operational Planning Process, Joint Targeting Cycle, Joint Doctrine on Cyberspace Operations, and related operational concepts. The officer is to build skills for the effective application of cyber capabilities, effects, and be able to integrate Cyberspace Operations within operational planning and execution processes. In particular, the Officer will be able to develop, compare, and evaluate courses of action incorporating Cyberspace Operations and identify targets and processes against which cyber capabilities can be employed to achieve operational effects in support of operational objectives.

4. Organizational Construct and Policy Context. The officer will be able to describe the administrative and operational structures and command relationships of the organizations and commands that operate within the cyberspace domain. The officer must have foundational understanding of the application of DOD / DON policies, related strategies, authorities, and the Law of Armed Conflict in the execution of Cyberspace Operations, Cyber Warfare, and associated capabilities. The officer will be able to illustrate the employment of these organizational relationships and policy, strategy, authorities, and legal context in an operational environment (i.e., Cyberspace Operations implications from U.S. law, National Security Strategy, DOD Cyber strategies, DOD and related policies, Rules of Engagement, etc.)

5. Comprehension of the Cyberspace Environment. The officer will understand the characteristics of friendly, neutral, and adversary Cyber environments and likely methodologies for adversary employment of cyber capabilities (e.g., infrastructure, prevalent technologies, policy limitations or deterrence, etc.). The officer will understand the parameters of Cyberspace Situational Awareness methodologies for attribution, collateral damage effects, and operational risk of Cyberspace Operations. Further, the officer will understand architecture and design principles that underpin cyberspace as well as demonstrate the ability to analyze specific cyber system implementations to identify vulnerabilities and potential attack vectors. The officer must also understand operational implications when the environment shifts from a permissive to a contested environment.

6. Relationship to other Warfare Areas. The officer will understand and illustrate the relationships, overlaps, and interdependencies between cyberspace and traditional warfare areas to include air, surface, undersea, amphibious, strike, and expeditionary warfare. Further, the officer will also demonstrate understanding of the relationships and interdependencies between cyberspace and space and Electromagnetic Maneuver Warfare. In particular, the officer will be able to describe alternative approaches to conducting Cyberspace Operations within an Anti-Access/Area Denial scenario.

7. Independent Research. The officer will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research and investigation through the completion of a thesis or capstone project which meets the requirements of the conferred degree. Thesis or capstone work will be conducted in a framework that exercises the practice of innovation, critical thinking, problem solving, and real-world applicability. Where possible, the topic of the thesis or capstone project will support operational focus areas defined by the mission area sponsor. Further, the officer will be able to present research goals and results in both written and oral form.

8. Joint Professional Military Education (JPME). Per community requirements, the officer will have an understanding of warfighting within the context of operational art to include: strategy and war, theater security decision making, and joint maritime operations. Completing the Naval War College four-course series leading to Intermediate Level Professional Military Education and JPME phase I certification fulfills this requirement.