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Course Descriptions

 

Course Descriptions

  AE4830 - Spacecraft Systems I

This course emphasizes the systems analysis of geosynchronous spacecraft and covers the analysis of GNC (orbit and attitude control), structures, propulsion, thermal and electrical power subsystems. Basic mathematical equations will be used in the preliminary design of the subsystems and the tradeoff studies involved. The differences and similarities between dual-spin and three-axis stabilized spacecraft will be covered in detail. Systems aspect of a typical mission profile will be illustrated. Throughout, emphasis will be on the spacecraft bus. Students will be engaged in problem solving during most of the laboratory period.

Prerequisites: Completion of Space Operations core-curriculum

 AE4831 - Spacecraft Systems II

In this course, students will be involved in a group project to design a spacecraft to meet mission requirements. Material presented in AE4830 as well as AE4831 will be utilized. In parallel, this course covers some or all of the following aspects of spacecraft systems: spacecraft testing, TT&C subsystem, and design of observation payloads. Differences and similarities between geosynchronous spacecraft and LEO/HEO spacecraft will be discussed. Topics include gravitational perturbation (J2 effects), gravity-gradient stabilization, and atmospheric drag effects.

Prerequisites: Completion of Space Operations core-curriculum

 CC3000 - Command Control Communication Computer and Intelligence Systems in DoD

Knowledge of current C4I systems and practice is introduced. A basic framework for understanding C4I is provided. Case studies are used as well as lessons learned from crises, field exercises and wargaming.

 CC4900 - Multi-Criteria Engineering

TBD

 CC4920 - Multi-criteria Engineering

The major goal of this course is to learn where and how to search for the best solutions for problems with contradictory criteria. This course will introduce methodology for correct statement and solution of engineering optimization problems, called the Parameter Space Investigation (PSI) method. This technique has been widely integrated into various fields of industry, science, and technology. The PSI method is implemented in the comprehensive software system MOVI (Multicriteria Optimization and Vector Identification) that will be used and distributed during the course.

 CS2900 - Introduction to Objects and Programming

This course teaches the fundamental programming concepts. The course adopts the object-first approach in teaching object-oriented programming. The use of predefined objects is explained before teaching how to define your own classes. Topics covered in the course include control structures, classes, objects, methods, visibility modifiers, strings, arrays, event-driven programming, exception handling, simple graphics, and software development and testing techniques. Although Java is used as the programming language, this course is about objects and programming.

 CS3000 - Great Principles of Computing Technology

An introduction to computing technology that underlies all of information technology (IT). Offers a holistic view of the computing field and its connections with other fields in science, business, and philosophy. Covers deep principles of information technology in the areas of computation, communication, coordination, storage, and automation. Emphasizes the historical development of these principles, why they have stood the tests of time, how they relate to one another, and how they relate to issues in other fields. Prepares students for graduate study in computing-related fields.

 CS3006 - An Introduction to Information System Security

Due to the rapid development and ubiquitous deployment of computer and information systems, and the very nature of insecurities they may hold, professionals involved with the design, development, deployment, and management of these systems now require a familiarity with information assurance and security. This course will introduce topics relevant to information assurance (IA) and computer security necessary to create a foundation of knowledge for the information management professional. The domains of knowledge to be introduced during the course include: access control systems and methodology; telecommunications and network security; security management practices; application and systems development security; cryptography; security architecture and models; operations security; business continuity and disaster recovery planning; laws, investigations, and ethics; and physical security. This course is meant to introdue the topics and will lay the foundations for further studies in any of the domains listed.

 CS3010 - Computer Systems Principles

Designed to provide computer science majors with a basic understanding of computer systems hardware. The course includes the following topics. Basic computer concepts, number systems and data representation, digital logic and Boolean algebra, storage devices and organization, basic computer organization and control, and instruction formats, addressing modes and the assembler process. No previous background in computer hardware is assumed.

 CS3310 - Artificial Intelligence

Survey of topics and methods of Artificial Intelligence. Methods include rule-based systems, heuristic search and exploitation of natural constraints, means-ends analysis, semantic networks, and frames. Emphasis is placed on solving problems that seem to require intelligence rather than attempting to simulate or study natural intelligence. Projects to illustrate basic concepts are assigned.

 CS3320 - Database Systems

This course presents an up-to-date introduction to database systems including database system architectures, data models, query languages, and design of databases.

 CS3450 - Operating Systems

A theoretical and practical treatment of operating concepts. Major course topics include concurrency, Ada tasking, virtual memory including demand paging and segmentation, dynamic linking and loading, file structures and information security. The laboratory portion of the class will give students the opportunity to write and test components of a modern operating system.

 CS3502 - Computer Communications and Networks

An introduction to the structure and architecture of computer networks. The physical, data link and network layers of the ISO model are covered, as well as some aspects of the higher layers. Several important communication protocols are studied, including the currently used models for their specifications and analysis. Local Area Networks, such as Ethernet and Token Ring, are also covered. Term papers and/or a project are an important aspect of this course.

 CS3600 - Information Assurance: Introduction to Computer Security

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the terminology, concepts, issues, policies, and technologies associated with the fields of Information and Software Assurance. It covers the notions of threats, vulnerabilities, risks and safeguards as they pertain to the desired information security properties of confidentiality, integrity, authenticity and availability for all information that is processed, stored, or transmitted in/by information systems. This is the entry point (prerequisite) for all other Computer Security Track courses.

 CS3606 - An Introduction to Information System Security

Due to the rapid development and ubiquitous deployment of computer and information systems, and the very nature of insecurities they may hold, professionals involved with the design, development, deployment, and management of these systems now require a familiarity with information assurance and security. This course will introduce topics relevant to information assurance (IA) and computer security necessary to create a foundation of knowledge for the information management professional. The domains of knowledge to be introduced during the course include: access control systems and methodology; telecommunications and network security; security management practices; application and systems development security; cryptography; security architecture and models; operations security; business continuity and disaster recovery planning; laws, investigations, and ethics; and physical security. This course is meant to introduce the topics and will lay the foundations for further studies in any of the domains listed.

 CS3640 - Analysis of DoD Critical Infrastructure Protection

The DOD relies on the correct functioning of an extensive information and control infrastructure to accomplish its mission. To assist in ensuring the survivability of assets that comprise this infrastructure, the DOD has formulated a CIP lifecycle, which includes: Analysis & Assessment, Remediation, Indicators & Warnings, Mitigation, Incident Response, and Reconstitution. This course introduces students to this lifecycle, and how the criticality and survivability of mission-critical infrastructures within the DOD are assessed.

 CS3901 - Introduction to Data Structures and Intermediate Programming

This is the second course in the programming practice sequence. One of the main goals of this course is the teaching of data structures so the students will be able develop intermediate level programs. Another goal is the teaching of modern programming techniques such as threads and advanced level object-oriented programming concepts such as inheritance and polymorphism. Topics covered in the course include recursion, file input and output, sorting and searching, threads, stacks and queues, lists, binary search trees, balanced binary search trees, and hashing.

 CS4112 - Distributed Operating Systems

An advanced treatment of operating systems concepts. Major course topics include distributed operating systems, distributed operating system architectures and concurrent programming. Other topics including secure operating systems and real-time operating systems as time permits.

 CS4130 - Wireless Mobile Computing

The objective of this course is to introduce the latest in wireless mobile computing and its applications. Instead of starting from the basics, this course will start from the top and go down as required to understand the state-of-the-art in wireless technology, mobile computing platforms, and applications. Mobile computing has enabled a large number of new applications that have impacted the life style and productivity of many. We will discuss applications on top of traditional wireless networks, in which an underlying infrastructure is assumed, as well as ad hoc mobile wireless networks, in which nodes may come and go and must form their own network infrastructure on the fly. Every two weeks we will review significant market developments in relevant areas. This will help students appreciate the market relevance of the technology covered in the course and get a better understanding of the state-of-the-art.

 CS4550 - Computer Networks II

This course covers advanced and emerging topics in computer networking. Some topics taught in CS3502 will be reviewed and studied in more detail. Other course subjects may vary from instructor to instructor and they include: multimedia networking, wireless networks, multicasting, peer-to-peer networks, quality of service, network management, network architecture, and security.

 CS4554 - Network Modeling and Analysis

The purpose of this class is to learn to formally specify and analyze network protocols, emphasizing wireless protocols, and in the process acquire a thorough understanding of these protocols. Formal protocol models such as communicating finite state machines and systems of communicating machines will be used as a tool for this purpose. Some protocols other than wireless protocols may also be covered. Several research papers from recent years will be assigned reading. Cellular networking, IEEE 802.11, Bluetooth, and wireless local loop networks will be covered as well. The class will study these protocols in the context of the network architectures and physical environments they are intended to perform in. Students should acquire an increased knowledge of formal tools, experience in protocol and system analysis, and a better understanding of protocols and networks. At the discretion of the professor, other advanced topics such as simulation and statistical analysis of networks and network protocols may be added.

  EC0820 - Capstone Project in Electrical Engineering (0-8)

Supervised project in Electrical and Computer Engineering to meet the needs of the individual student. A written report is required.

Prerequisite: Approval of project proposal by student's committee and the department chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

 EC0830 - Capstone Project in Electrical Engineering (0-8)

Supervised project in Electrical and Computer Engineering to meet the needs of the individual student. A written report is required.

Prerequisite: Approval of project proposal by student's committee and the department chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

 EC2450 - Accelerated Review of Signals and Systems

TBD

 EC3000 - Introduction to Graduate Research (1-0)

This course is designed to prepare students to undertake graduate research and to write a thesis or dissertation. The first part of the course provides an overview of (1) the NPS Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Department's research program and its faculty, (2) the NPS's Research Program and the organization and functions of the NPS Research Office, (3) NPS library electronic resources, (4) an overview of S&T planning in the DoD, and (5) guidance on the thesis process. In the second part of the course, research opportunities are presented by the faculty. A broader view of the field of electrical and computer engineering is gained through student attendance at ECE Department seminars delivered by outside speakers. In the third part of the course, students are exposed to thesis research currently being carried out in the ECE Department by attending thesis presentations delivered by graduating students.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

 EC3130 - Electrical Machinery Theory

An introduction to the analysis of magnetically-coupled circuits, dc machines, induction machines, and synchronous machines. The course will include explicit derivations of torque, voltage, and flux linkage equations, formulation of steady-state circuits, development of reference frame theory, and the basics of machine simulation as required in shipboard electric drive analysis.

Prerequisite: EC2110 (may be taken concurrently).

 EC3210 - Introduction to Electro-Optical Engineering (3-2

)An overview of the elements that comprise current electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) military systems. Topics include radiation sources (both laser and thermal), detector devices, modulators, optical elements, and propagation characteristics. Examples of the application of the concepts taught to various military EO/IR systems, such as missile seekers, laser communications, and laser designators are discussed.

Prerequisite: EC2200 (may be concurrent).

 EC3400 - Digital Signal Processing

The foundations of one-dimensional digital signal processing techniques are developed. Topics include Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithms, block convolution, the use of DFT and FFT to compute convolution, and design methods for nonrecursive and recursive digital filters. Multirate signal processing techniques are also introduced for sampling rate conversion, efficient analog to digital, digital to analog conversion, time frequency decomposition using filter banks and quadrature mirror filters. Computer-aided design techniques are emphasized. The algorithms introduced have direct applications in sonar and radar signal processing, IR sensor arrays, modern navy weapon systems, and also in voice and data communications.

Prerequisite: EC2410.

 EC3410 - Discrete-Time Random Signals

Fundamentals of random processes are developed with an emphasis on discrete time for digital signal processing, control, and communications. Parameter estimation concepts are introduced, and impact of uncertainty in parameter evaluation (estimated moments and confidence intervals) are presented. Random processes are introduced. DKLT and applications to image processing and classification problems are considered. Impact of linear transformations to linear systems is discussed. FIR Wiener, and matched filters are introduced. IIR Wiener filter introduced, time permitting. Applications to signal and system characterization in areas such as system identification, forecasting, and equalizations are considered to illustrate concepts discussed during the course.

Prerequisites: EC2410 (may be concurrent) and EC2010

 EC3500 - Analysis of Random Signals

Fundamental concepts and useful tools for analyzing non-deterministic signals and noise in military communication, control, and signal processing systems are developed. Topics include properties of random processes, correlation functions, energy and spectral densities, linear systems and mean square estimation, noise models and special processes.

Prerequisites: EC2500(may be concurrent) and EC2010, or consent of instructor.

 EC3510 - Communications Engineering

The influence of noise and interference on the design and selection of digital and analog communications systems is analyzed. Topics include link budget analysis and signal-to-noise ratio calculations, receiver performance for various analog and digital modulation techniques, and bandwidth and signal power trade-offs. Examples of military communications systems are included.

Prerequisites: EC2220 and EC3500 or EC3410

 EC3600 - Antennas and Propagation (3-2)

The principles of electromagnetic radiation are applied to antenna engineering, scattering, and propagation. The characteristics of various practical antenna types are considered including arrays and reflectors. Scattering concepts are introduced and propagation phenomena are considered. Applications include sidelobe suppression, radar target scattering and stealth approaches, HF and satellite communications.

Prerequisite: EC2650 or equivalent.

 EC3610 - Microwave Engineering (3-2)

This course provides an overview of the circuits and devices used in microwave radar communication and electronic warfare systems. The course covers network analysis using scattering parameters, transmission media, selected circuits, electron tubes, solid state devices, and monolithic integrated circuits. Circuits and devices are studied in the laboratory using both hardware and computer simulation.

Prerequisite: EC2650.

 EC3630 - Radiowave Propagation (3-2)

This course treats the effects of the earth and its atmosphere on the propagation of electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies. Topics covered include ground waves, sky waves, ducting, reflection, refraction, diffraction, scattering, attenuation, and fading. Basic theory is covered and computer models are introduced where appropriate. Emphasis is placed on determination of the transmission loss between transmitting and receiving antennas.

Prerequisites: EC2650 or consent of instructor.

 EC3700 - Joint Network Enabled Electronic Warfare I (3-2)

The fundamental electronic warfare analysis course for Electrical Engineering majors. The course considers the sensors and associated weapon systems in use by the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marines. Also, electronic warfare in joint theater, electronic warfare receiving systems, communications electronics, signal and telemetry intelligence systems, artillery, directed energy, and laser weapon systems. Active, passive, IR, and dual-mode seeker technologies are also discussed.

Prerequisite: EC2010.

 EC3710 - Computer Communications Methods

The course objective is to develop an understanding of computer communications networks with emphasis on the requirements of military environments and the U.S. Navy's combat platforms. Coverage includes the essential topics of network topology, connectivity, queuing delay, message throughput, and performance analysis. The layered network architectures, such as the seven-layer OSI model and DoD's TCP/IP protocol suite, are covered. The techniques and protocols used in these layers are discussed. Local area networking technologies such as Ethernet, FDDI and wireless Ethernet, and wide area technologies such as X.25 and frame relay are covered. Principles of networking devices (hubs, switches, and routers) are presented. Some distributed applications are presented briefly.

Prerequisites: EC2010 and EC2500.

 EC4150 - Advanced Solid State Power Conversion

Design and analysis of modern power electronic drives with particular emphasis on electric drives for present and future ship propulsion systems and variable frequency/variable speed power converters for advanced shipboard electric power distribution. Electrical and mechanical systems compatibility and electrical system interfacing topics are addressed. This course begins by examining the non-ideal aspects of power semiconductor switches and other components. In addition, dynamic performance of power electronic circuits is explored. The course includes some more advanced topics like resonant converters and active power line conditioners.

Prerequisites: EC3150 and electrical machine theory, or consent of instructor.

 EC4450 - Sonar Systems Engineering

Mathematical development and discussion of fundamental principles that pertain to the design and operation of passive and active sonar systems critical to naval operations. Topics from complex aperture theory, array theory, and signal processing are covered. This course supports the undersea warfare and engineering acoustics curricula and others.

 EC4570 - Signal Detection and Estimation

Principles of optimal signal processing techniques for detecting signals in noise are considered. Topics include maximum likelihood, Bayes risk, Neyman-Pearson and min-max criteria and calculations of their associated error probabilities (ROC curves). Principles of maximum likelihood, Bayes cost, minimum mean-square error (MMSE), and maximum a posteriori estimators are introduced. Integral equations and the Karhunen-Loeve expansion are introduced. The estimator-correlator structure is derived. Emphasis is on dual development of continuous time and discrete time approaches, the latter being most suitable for digital signal processing implementations. This course provides students the necessary foundation to undertake research in military radar and sonar systems.

Prerequisite: EC3410 or EC3500

 EC4610 - Radar Systems (3-2)

The radar range equation is developed in a form including signal integration, the effects of target cross section, fluctuations, and propagation losses. Modern techniques discussed include pulse compression frequency modulated radar, moving target indicator (MTI) and pulse Doppler systems, monopulse tracking systems, multiple unit steerable array radars, and synthetic aperture systems. Laboratory sessions deal with basic pulse radar systems from which the advanced techniques have developed, with pulse compression, and with the measurement of radar cross section of targets.

Prerequisites: EC3600.

 EC4630 - Radar Cross Section Prediction and Reduction (3-2)

This course covers the design and engineering aspects of stealth and its impact on platform and sensor design. Signature prediction methods in the radar, infrared (IR), and laser frequency bands are discussed. Radar cross section (RCS) analysis methods include geometrical optics and diffraction theory, physical optics and the physical theory of diffraction, and numerical solutions to integral and differential equations. Prediction methods for IR and laser cross sections (LCS) are also introduced. Signature reduction by shaping, materials selection, and active and passive cancellation are applied to each frequency regime. The measurement of these cross sections is also covered.

Prerequisite: EC3600 or consent of instructor.

 EC4640 - Airborne Radar Systems (3-2)

**The main objective of this course is to discuss concepts and digital signal processing techniques involved in modern airborne radars, which detect targets in presence of large ground clutter and other interferences. Radar waveforms (or modes) are treated as continuous wave (CW), high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF), medium pulse repetition frequency (MPRF), and low pulse repetition frequency (LPRF). Practical implementation and the signal processing associated with each mode will be elaborated. Advantages and limitations of each mode shall be discussed. Military applications of these modes will be discussed in the existing airborne and surface based radar systems. Concepts and algorithms are covered for digital pulse compression, MTI clutter cancellation, Doppler processing, constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection, ambiguity resolution, synthetic array radar (SAR) processing and other associated techniques and algorithms.

Prerequisite: EC4610 or equivalent.

 EC4680 - Joint Network Enabled Electronic Warfare II (3-2)

The scope of radar electronic warfare has become network-centric in order to support a coordinated multi-platform C2W by employing a distributed, networked system-of-systems. Network-centric EW compensates for most of the platform-centric limitations by achieving geometric flexibility, eliminating look-through and providing the ability to initiate coordinated jammer responses (improved jammer management through better information). Radar EW now involves a wide range of electronic combat and sensor technologies networked in a distributed system-of-systems for C2W. This course will concentrate on both platform-centric and network-centric radar electronic attack and protection concepts. The capabilities and information requirements for wideband vs. narrowband sensors, stand-off, high altitude sensors vs. stand-in low altitude sensors will be evaluated. The role of stand-in vs. escort vs. stand-off jammers in a distributed sensor grid will also be examined. Students build and test a heterogeneous EW sensor network using the Airborne Reactive EW Simulation (Ares) software package developed by NRL using the EWIRDB parameters.

Prerequisites: EC3700 and EC4610. U.S. citizenship and SECRET level clearance required.

 EC4710 - High Speed Networking

The course systematically develops the traffic characteristics of DoD and commercial broadband services (video, voice, text, and other multimedia information) and determines the need for high-speed networks with emphasis on quality of service. Queuing theory is used in the design and analysis of the various modules of a high-speed network: traffic modeling, switches, admission control, scheduling, traffic monitoring, and congestion control. Emerging trends and technologies that enable deployment of high-speed global networks for tactical, commercial, and residential use are discussed. Topics include queuing theory, traffic models, traffic management, and broadband technologies, such as ATM, Gigabit Ethernet, DSL, and cable access. Laboratory is concerned with the use of OPNET for simulation studies of various network topologies.

Prerequisite: EC3850 or consent of instructor.

 EC4745 - Mobile Ad-hoc Wireless Networks

The course presents the fundamental principles, design issues, performance analysis, and military applications of infrastructure and ad hoc wireless packet switched networks. Radio wave propagation, wireless channel characteristic, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing, transceiver design, channel coding, and other physical layer technologies are reviewed. Principles of wireless local area and wide area (cellular) networks are presented. Design and performance analysis of medium access control mechanisms - contention, reservation and scheduling - are covered. Mobile IP protocol is presented, and reactive and proactive protocols for routing in ad hoc networks are introduced. The performance of TCP over wireless networks is analyzed. Security in infrastructure and ad hoc networks is addressed. Sensor networks are introduced. Energy management is discussed. The widely used and emerging wireless networking standards are reviewed. Hardware laboratory assignments provide hands-on experience and OPNET projects allow simulation of large scale networks to complement the theory presented in the course.

Prerequisite: EC3710 or consent of instructor.

 EC4785 - Internet Engineering

This course examines the optimal design and analysis of interconnected, heterogeneous computer networks, specifically those employed by the US Navy (e.g., IT-21). A common theme throughout will be the confluence of connection-oriented and connectionless data communications and their overarching networking methodologies. The course will focus primarily on the TCT/IP suite. Techniques for segmentation and reassembly, routing, transfer agent placement, error control, throughput analysis, broadcasting, and multicasting will be examined in detail. Performance of common distributed applications will be analyzed.

Prerequisites: EC3710

 EC4900 - Topics for Individual Study in Electrical Engineering

Supervised study in selected areas of Electrical Engineering to meet the needs of the individual student. A written report is required at the end of the quarter.

Prerequisite: Consent of the department chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

 EO2402 - Introduction to Linear Systems

A course in the rudiments of linear systems for naval officers in non-electrical engineering curricula. Principles of discrete and continuous-time systems. Topics include difference equations, discrete and continuous convolution, correlation, transfer functions, and system diagrams. Transform applications in communication and control systems.

 EO3402 - Signals and Noise

A course in the rudiments of modern signal processing for naval officers in non-electrical engineering curricula. Topics include signal processing in the frequency domain using the DFT and FFT, random signals, their description and processing. Applications to signal detection, demodulation, filtering, beam forming, target tracking, and other relevant naval and military operations.

 EO3404 - Applied Signal Processing

This course introduces the fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing as applied to one dimensional acoustic signals. The course covers the fundamental theory of Signals and Systems, the application of the DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform) to problems in spectral estimation, digital filter design, detection of pulses by correlation and fundamentals of array processing. The laboratories are entirely based on processing of acoustic signals using Matlab.

 EO3516 - Intro to Communications Systems Engineering

A first course in communication sytems for the Space Systems Operations curriculum. The course considers basic electricity and electronics, signals and systems, and amplitude modulation transmission and reception.

 EO4516 - Communications Systems Analysis

The final course in communication systems engineering for the Space Systems Operations curriculum. The course considers propagation effects on signal transmission; end-to-end path calculations for wire/coax, and RF systems including terrestrial ground links and satellite communications; spread spectrum; wireless/cellular communications.

Prerequisites: EO3516

 GP3100 - Global Change and International Governance

This course addresses principles that drive globalization and how and where the military and civilians address the civil dimension in pre-conflict, conflict, and post-conflict environments. Theories of regional economic development, location and trade are applied to the contemporary process known as "globalization" and used to decipher its effects on regional and national patterns of development, employment, income distribution, political institutions, and policymaking. Specific topics of discussion are: globalization and the production of risks, climate and environmental change, division of labor, power and governance, regional and international development, risks as drivers of change, financial and information flows, and capitalism and globalization.

 GP3200 - Security and Development

This covers the basic principles that drive globalization, despite its many challenges, also brings complex security challenges including state failure, transnational terrorism, energy crisis and pandemics. These global security issues compel us to think about prevention and stability operations in new ways. The course seeks to develop analytic skills and empirical knowledge needed to assess requirements and capacities for stability, security and development, and to develop strategies for peace building. Students will gain expertise relevant to preventive engagement and counterinsurgency, and especially to civil-military operations such as humanitarian relief, peace and stability operations abroad and homeland security efforts at home. Specific areas of concentration are: stability in the global context, theories and strategies, implementation challenges, and practical applications.

 GP3300 - Introduction to Analytic Methods

GP3300 focuses on the use of analytical decision making techniques in the support of stability operations. The first part of the course focuses on the framework for analytical decision-making and accurate costing of projects. The second part of the course discusses multi-objective decision-making. In the final part of the course, we will discuss risk and the economics of stability operations.

 IO3100 - Information Operations

This course provides a survey of Information Operations (IO) along the time line of peace, to conflict, and back to cessation of hostilities. Students study the methods and elements which contribute to successful Information Operations including: Psychological operations and deception, Operational security, information assurance, and infrastructure protection, Electronic attack/protect/support, Physical attack/destruction in support of IO, Military-civilian relationship, Human cognition and decision making, Command and control structures, Legal issues, Computer and network attack, Systems engineering concepts (including modeling and simulation), Sensor and signals intelligence support to IO.

Security classification: UNCLAS.

 IS2000 - Introduction to Information Technology Management

Provide an introduction to the field of Information Technology Management and the functions and responsibilities of the information technology manager.

 IS2020 - Object Oriented Event Driven Programming Using Visual Basic .Net

IS2020 is an introductory course in computer programming using Visual Basic .Net, DoN's IT21 mandated standard, as a high level, event-driven object-oriented, programming language. Course emphasis will be on planning, program development, graphical user interfaces, rapid prototyping, program construction, data types, operations, control flow, arrays, records, file I/O, database access, and event-driven OOP structures.

 IS2502 - Network Fundamentals

IS2502 is a fundamentals course focused on the basics of computer networking. Since networking is an underpinning to our technology-driven society, understanding the basics of computer networking is important to any technology professional interested in building a solid technology understanding, and is especially important as a precursor to other courses in the Information Systems and Information Technology arenas.

 IS3200 - Systems Analysis and Design

This is a course in systems analysis and design. This survey course covers the basic concepts, models, and processes used by systems analysts to determine: 1) what is the current situation of an organization that desires to improve itself, 2) what are the problems and opportunities in this situation, and 3) what plans and specifications can be formed to feasibly address these problems or opportunities. The course covers how system analysis is performed to successfully cover these three areas of inquiry and how it connects to system design. Then, the fundamentals of information system design are discussed and applied. The class stops at the point of detailed design, for instance complete specifications of an internet web interface or database application. This topic is covered in subsequent Information Systems classes. When the course is finished, it is expected that the students understand the system development lifecycle, system analysis and design methodologies and have applied them in a team project within the class.

 IS3201 - Fundamentals of Database Management Systems

Introduction to database technology provides the basic knowledge, language, and experience to manage data electronically. Students will learn the essential activities of how to store, retrieve, manage, and control data using a relational database management system. They not only will learn how to build a database application using Microsoft Access, and but also how to deploy database technology in a larger, organizational context to support problem solving. Further, by the time students have completed the course, they will know the major steps required to manage a complex database project.

Prerequisite: None.

 IS3210 - Information and Knowledge Management Issues in Defense (4-0)

This elective course on defense knowledge and information management integrates theory with practice to help prepare current and future leaders to leverage knowledge and knowing for competitive advantage in learning organizations. Knowing refers to knowledge in action and is concerned with activities (e.g., decisions, behaviors, work) in the organization. Using emerging knowledge-flow theory as its intellectual base, the theoretical part of the course helps professionals understand: how knowledge is both critical and unique; how it builds and depends on information; and how to design effective work processes, organizations, and technologies around dynamic knowledge and information. Using application cases for group critique, the problem-based learning part of the course examines a diverse set of knowledge-based processes and organizations in operation today, and it offers both principles for and experience in identifying strengths and weaknesses. Students also select new or operational knowledge-based processes for evaluation, and work individually as consultants to assess and redesign them around knowledge flows. This course may be offered as an online course. You can view more details at the NPS online Web site.

Prerequisite: None.

 IS3301 - Fundamentals of Decision Support Systems

Principles for designing, implementing and using computer systems that support a variety of decision making situations. Surveys or analytical techniques for decision making in complex environments, involving single or multiple criteria made under certainty and uncertainty, and techniques for automated inference are examined. The latest computer-based systems, and exemplary applications in DoD, that support or involve the use of formal decision making methods and tools are covered. Group project requires the design and implementation of a decision support system for a specific problem.

 IS3302 - Fundamentals of Database and Decision Support

Database management systems and decision support systems constitute essential components of information-driven organizations. These systems are employed in a wide array of activities, ranging from combat support to logistics and administration. The course proposed here covers the essential aspects of database management and decision support systems. The course has a "how to" flavor, i.e., in addition to conveying the essential concepts and methods, we seek to familiarize students with the tools and processes.

Prerequisite: None.

 IS3502 - Computer Networks: Wide Area/Local Area (Intro to Information Systems Networks)

Architecture, standard protocols, and technological advances in computer networks, with an emphasis on internet working and interoperability. Specific topics include open network architectures (OSI vs. DoD architecture), X.25, local area networks, TCP/IP, and a variety of distributed application services built on the client-server model. Students also gain an understanding of Network Centric Warfare requirements surrounding DDN (Defense Data Network), X.400-based DMS (Defense Message System), SDNS (Secure Data Network Service), and GOSIP (Government Open System Interconnection Profile).

 IS4201 - Enterprise Database Management

An elective course that will focus on the technological infrastructure, as well as the management processes, related to the operations and maintenance of enterprise data management systems. Prerequisite: IS3201.

 IS4210 - Knowledge Superiority

This elective course on knowledge superiority integrates theory with practice to help prepare current and future leaders to leverage knowledge and knowing for competitive advantage in learning organizations. Knowing refers to knowledge in action, and is concerned with activities (e.g., decision, behaviors, work) in the organization. Using emerging knowledge-flow theory as its intellectual base, the theoretical part of the course helps professionals understand how knowledge is both critical and unique, and equips them to design effective work processes, organizations, and technologies around knowledge flows. Using real-time cases for group critique, the problem-based learning part of the course examines a diverse set of knowledge-based processes and organizations in operation today, and offers both principles for and experience in identifying strengths and weaknesses. Students also select new or operational knowledge-based processes for evaluation, and work individually as consultants to assess and redesign them around knowledge flows.

Prerequisites: IS3201 and IS3301, or IS3302, or equivalent with consent of the instructor.

 IS4301 - Data Warehousing, Mining & Visualization

This elective course is designed to provide students with the basic concepts of data warehousing, data mining, and visualization. The course emphasizes both technical and managerial issues and the implications of these emerging technologies on those issues. The course has a distinctly "real-world" and DoD orientation that emphasizes application and implementation over design and development. A state-of-the-art system/tool will be used to help students understand and apply the concepts presented in the class.

Prerequisites: IS3201 and IS3301 and IS3200, or consent of the instructor.

  MA3025 - Logic and Discrete Mathematics

MA3025 provides a rigorous foundation in logic and elementary discrete mathematics to students of mathematics and computer science. Topics from logic include modeling English propositions, propositional calculus, quantification, and elementary predicate calculus. Additional mathematical topics include elements of set theory, mathematical induction, relations and functions, and elements of number theory.

 ME4702 - Engineering Systems Risk Benefit Analysis (3-2)

This course emphasizes three methodologies, Decision Analysis (DA), Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (RPRA) and Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA). The course is designed to give students an understanding of how these diverse topics can be applied to decision making process of product design that must take into consideration significant risk. The course will present and interprets a framework for balancing risks and benefits to applicable situations. Typically these involve human safety, potential environmental effects, and large financial and technological uncertainties. Concepts from CBA and RPRA are applied for real world problems resulting in decision models that provide insight and understanding, and consequently, leading to improved decisions. Same course as OS4010.

Prerequisites: OS3104/EO4021 or equivalent course in probability, or consent of instructor.

 MN2304 - Seminar In Product Development (0-4)

This course brings both government and industry product development leaders into the academic forum for interaction with students. Guest lecturers include government and industry product development executives, program managers, laboratory and field personnel, department officials, congressional members and staff personnel. Visits to government and industry facilities. Thesis and research presentations. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

 MN3042 - Operations Management

This course provides an overview of operations in military and commercial systems. The course has three sections: (1) Creating processes, including a survey of process types, capacity planning, and service system design; (2) Controlling processes, including MRP/ERP systems and the role of information; and (3) Coordinating processes, including inventory management, purchasing, and supply chain management.

Prerequisite: None.

 MN3108 - Leadership in Product Development

A survey course providing a broad framework for the leadership of end-to-end product commercialization, to give students perspective and appreciation for the critical success factors and inhibitors to successful commercialization of complex products and systems. The format includes lectures, guest speakers, and case studies covering strategy and leadership, the front-end process, product delivery, distribution and customer support.

 MN3117 - Organizational Processes

The purpose of this course is to provide the conceptual framework and skills needed to manage and lead organizations. The focus will be on three levels of skills needed to manage modern organizations: skills needed to manage individuals, skills needed to manage teams, and skills needed to manage the organization as a whole. It focuses on the organization of the future, identifies its characteristics, and explores the implications for living in, managing, and leading such an organization. The course also focuses on skills such as negotiating, cross-cultural communication, and teamwork. It examines the creation of the structures needed within the firm and the alliances, learning, and change practices needed to maintain global performance. The course will use cases, experiential exercises, readings, discussions, and papers. Students have the opportunity to integrate conceptual material with their own experiences, beliefs, and actions.

 MN3145 - Marketing Management

This course takes a general management approach to marketing, examining (1) marketing as a process that creates and sustains customer value; and (2) the manager's role in assuring that the firm delivers products that are successful in the marketplace. The curriculum will emphasize approaches to market research (the "voice of the customer"), innovation, and creating customer value in product development, product management, and general management of marketing activities. Topics include: market oriented strategic planning, the TQM marketing process, market research, segmentation, target markets, differentiation, product management, the marketing mix, customer satisfaction, and e-commerce. Case studies are used extensively.

 MN3155 - Financial Management for Acquisition Managers

This course is a study of financial management practices and issues associated with federal government acquisition programs. The course has emphasis on (1) the resource management process flow from initiation of a new acquisition program through execution of appropriated funds (procurement and research & development accounts) for that program, (2) the congressional approval and review process unique to procurement, and (3) cost estimation, analysis and evaluation as tools for sound acquisition management decision making, and long-term investment analysis.

Prerequisites: MN2155; and MN3331 or MN3221 or consent of instructor.

 MN3156 - Finance and Managerial Accounting

The objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how managerial accounting and corporate finance are used to help organizations achieve their goals. It covers the preparation and interpretation of financial information for investors (external users) and managers (internal users) and the use of financial instruments to support system and project creation. Students will learn the relationship between managerial accounting, financial accounting, and financial management. Special emphasis will be placed upon the identification and application of techniques used by managers to measure the costs of goods or services and how selection of specific alternatives impact the value of the firm.

 MN3221 - Principles of Acquisition and Program Management I

This is the first of two courses which provides the student with an understanding of the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods within this process. The course examines management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods and functional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationships will be examined in team exercise settings. Topics, from a program management perspective, include the evolution and current state of systems acquisition management, the system acquisition life cycle, requirements analysis, systems engineering, contract management, resource management, test and evaluation, user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Case studies are used to analyze various acquisition issues. Combined with MN3222, this course provides DAU Equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, and PMT 250.

Prerequisite: None.

 MN3222 - Systems Acquistion and Program Management II

This course broadens the student's understanding of the principles of DoD systems acquisition and program management gained in MN3221 by examining program management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods, and functional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationships will be examined in exercise settings. The course structure concentrates on the activities occurring during the major milestones and acquisition phases. Cases involving key planning documents, activities and phase exit criteria are examined. DAU Equiv: ACQ 101; ACQ 201; PMT 250.

Prerequisites: MN3221 or permission of instructor.

 MN3301 - Acquisition of Defense Systems (4-0) Fall/Spring

This course introduces the principles and concepts that underlie successful defense acquisition management. The course focuses on management of the acquisition process for defense systems from the development of an initial desired capability or need through design, development, production, fielding, sustainment, and disposal. Students gain an understanding of successful acquisition as an interdisciplinary activity through contributions and applications of principles from business, management, and technical disciplines. The course also emphasizes the statutory, regulatory, and policy environment of acquisition. Numerous case studies illustrate the application of concepts and principles in actual acquisition programs. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) has granted MN3301 equivalency for ACQ 101, ACQ 201, BCF 102 and BCF 103.

Prerequisite: None.

 MN3303 - Principles of Acquisition and Contract Management

This course is an introduction to the principles of government acquisition and contracting. It presents the fundamentals of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the DoD FAR Supplement; the federal acquisition and contracting processes, including requirements determination, acquisition strategies, government contract law, ethics, contract types, contracting methods, and acquisition/contract management techniques.

Prerequisite: None.

 MN3309 - Acquisition of Embedded Weapon Systems Software

This course focuses on the key aspects of mission critical computer resources with particular emphasis on major weapon systems embedded software. The course analyzes software development, software risk management, software in the systems acquisition life cycle, software metrics, contracting methods for software, software test and evaluation, and software configuration management. Case studies, reports, software specifications and standards, and other similar documents/materials are used. The course addresses the underlying management principles involved in software acquisition. Significant software acquisition issues and problems are examined and solutions developed.

Prerequisites: MN3331 or MN3222 or MN3302.

 MN3331 - Principles of Acquisition and Program Management

This course provides the student with an understanding of the underlying concepts, fundamentals and philosophies of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process and the practical application of program management methods within this process. The course examines management characteristics and competencies, control policies and techniques, systems analysis methods and functional area concerns. Techniques for interpersonal relationships will be examined in team exercise settings. Topics, from a program management perspective, include the evolution and current state of systems acquisition management, the system acquisition life cycle, requirements analysis, systems engineering, contract management, resource management, test and evaluation, user-producer acquisition management disciplines and activities; and program planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Case studies are used to analyze various acquisition issues.

 MN3362 - Acquisition Design Verification and System Assessment

Advanced Acquisition Program. This course examines Developmental, Operational, and Joint Test & Evaluation as viewed from the Program Manager's perspective. The student will be able to distinguish the difference between the various testing types and the impact testing results will have on the decision makers thought process. Actual military and civilian test cases are used as examples for discussion purposes. Topics include the role of T&E in the Systems Engineering Process, T&E policy Structure and Oversight Mechanism, Requirements Generation, Modeling and Simulation, Alternative Acquisition Program T&E, Human systems Integration and Live Fire T&E. Integrative case studies involving managerial problem solving and decision making in the PMO environment are also used to provide application of concepts in both IPT teaming and multiple-role individual settings. Teamwork exercises are conducted to reinforce concepts and add real-world human dynamics. Upon completion, all exercises are evaluated with after-action reviews and assessments. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

 MN3363 - Acquisition Manufacturing and Quality Management

For AAAP program students. This course provides the student with knowledge and application of integrated management control processes with regard to performance, cost, and schedule, while examining higher-level and real world defense systems. Issue-oriented topic areas likely to affect Program Management Office personnel include: acquisition reform; acquisition strategy; industrial base; production and manufacturing; quality management; and risk management. Integrative case studies involving managerial problem solving and decision making in the PMO environment are also used to provide application of concepts in both IPT teaming and multiple-role individual settings. Teamwork exercises are conducted to reinforce concepts and add real-world human dynamics. Upon completion, all exercises are evaluated. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

 MN3364 - Business Financial and Contract Management

Advanced Acquisition Program. The course builds on the student's knowledge and experience in contracting, and contracting related fields, to address the more complex pre-award, award and post-award issues in the acquisition and contracting, and business and financial management arenas. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

 MN3365 - Acquisition Logistics & Program Sustainment

Advanced Acquisition Program. This course focuses on the logistics and sustainability planning for new major weapon systems in each phase of the DoD acquisition process. It links logistics and sustainability planning, in the early stages of system development, to the effects on the system's total ownership cost. The course describes sustainability planning and management through the Systems Engineering Process and supportability analyses techniques. The course addresses the following specific subject areas: Designing for Life Cycle Cost and Cost As an Independent Variable (CAIV); Logistics Supportability Elements; Supportability analyses; Logistics Open Systems; Software Support Planning; Supply Chain Management; and Post-Production Support Planning. Prerequisite: MN3331 or consent of instructor.

 MN3371 - Contracts Management and Administration

This course is a study of procurement planning, negotiation, and contract administration, including the determination of need, basic contract law, methods of procurement and fundamentals of management techniques. Topics include procurement organizations, procurement by sealed bidding and competitive negotiation, source selection, pricing, types of contracts, negotiating techniques, structuring incentives, the terms and conditions of contracts, managing contract progress, total quality management, change control, cost and schedule control, contract termination, dispute situations, and international contracting issues.

 MN3392 - Systems and Project Management

Systems and Project Management ensures progress toward objectives, proper deployment and conservation of human and financial resources, and achievement of cost and schedule targets. Topics include strategic project management, project and organizational learning, lean thinking, cost, schedule planning and control, structuring of performance measures and metrics, technical teams and project management, information technology support of teams, risk management, and process control. Course delivery consists of lectures, speakers, case studies, and experience sharing, and reinforces collaborative project-based learning and continuous improvement.

 MN3420 - Supply Chain Management (3-0)

This course is designed to provide an introduction to supply chain management (SCM). A supply chain is a network of organizations that supply and transform materials, and distribute final products to customers. Supply chain management is a broadly defined term for the analysis and improvement of flows of material, information, and money through this network of suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, and customers. The objective of SCM is to deliver the right product to the right customer at the right time. SCM emphasizes inventory-service level tradeoffs across the chain of players that, together, provide the product to a customer. Logistics has traditionally focused on materials issues within and downstream from the factory while SCM looks at the entire network of players, both up and down stream, and perhaps has more of an emphasis on information flows through the network. Logistics has traditionally been considered a more tactical topic while SCM has risen to prominence in recent years, attracting high-level attention. Ultimately, logistics and SCM activities are concerned with coordinating demand and supply. Common elements in that coordination are the management of materials (inventories), the location of materials (warehouses), and the movement of materials (transportation). As part of the coordination, an analyst must consider product and process designs as well as information flows between various players in the networks. These elements will form the basis of this course. This course is the Distributed Learning version of GB3420.

Prerequisites: MN3042, MN4043.

 MN3510 - Defense Financial Management Practice (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course is designed for MBA students and presumes the student has a foundation including the PPBE system and Congressional Authorization and Appropriation processes. This course concentrates on financial management practices within DoD as distinct from policy and budgeting theory. The course covers the actors and activities and mechanics of building and defending budgets. It covers funding mechanisms for programs and activities, addressing the proper use and management of appropriated, reimbursable, and revolving funds. Basic principles of fiscal law are explored. It then addresses financial management and stewardship topics including budgetary accounting, management of cost drivers, the relationship between comptrollership and contracting, and internal controls. Contemporary financial management issues are discussed. Exercises and case studies are used to develop the students' ability to apply financial management concepts to real life situations.

 MN4043 - Business Modeling and Analysis

This course introduces mathematical modeling for a sound conceptual understanding of the decision-making process. This course familiarizes the students with applications, assumptions, and limitations of the quantitative methods in modeling. It focuses on the development of mathematical and spreadsheet models, the verification of those models, sensitivity analysis of the solutions generated from a model, and the implementation of those solutions. Some of the topics covered include linear programming, non-linear and integer programming, simulation, and forecasting. The process of modeling and particular modeling tools are applied to business problems in finance, acquisition, logistics and manpower planning. This course is the Distributed Learning version of GB4043.

Prerequisites: None.

 MN4053 - Defense Budget and Financial Management Policy (4-0) Winter/Summer

This distance learning course analyzes the resource requirements process within the Department of Defense (DOD) and in the executive and legislative branches of the federal government. It begins with a summary of the current threat situation and potential changes to it. Once the threat is defined, the study of the resource allocation process to meet the threat begins. The course covers the resource planning and budgeting processes of the Department of the Navy, DOD and the federal government. It includes the politics of executive and congressional budgeting, and DOD budget and financial management processes and procedures including budget formulation and execution. It also includes analysis of the Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution system (PPBES) used by DOD to plan, budget and implement national defense resource management policy and programs. Other areas included are budget process and fiscal policy reform and the dynamics of internal DOD competition for resources. Executive and congressional budget processes are assessed to indicate how national security policy is resourced and implemented through the budget process. Spending for national security policy is tracked from budget submission through resolution, authorization and appropriation. Budget formulation, negotiation, and execution strategies are evaluated to indicate the dynamics of executive-legislative competition over resource allocation priorities. Supplemental appropriation patterns and current year budget execution patterns and problems are also considered.

Prerequistes: None.

 MN4307 - Program Management Policy and Control

This course provides the student with knowledge and understanding of major systems management control processes and tools, application of program management control systems and the use of computer-based management information systems with emphasis on real world, practical systems for performance, cost and schedule control. Case studies involving program management problem solving and decision making in the acquisition environment are used.

Prerequisites: MN3331/or MN3302, MN3309, MN3371, MN4602 or equivalent, SE4011 and MN3384.

 MN4310 - Cost Economics

The concept of integrated logistics support in the design and maintenance of weapon systems. Operational requirements, reliability, system maintenance concept, functional analysis, life cycle costs, logistics support analysis, systems design, test and evaluation, production, spare/repair parts management are discussed. This course also covers topics in logistics information technology, inventory management culture and commercial-sector best practices for military. Case studies include logistics life-cycle cost, reliability and readiness analysis for major weapon systems.

 MN4366 - Program Management and Leadership

This course provides the student with knowledge and understanding of major systems management control processes and tools, application of program management control systems and the use of computer-based management information systems with emphasis on real world, practical systems for performance, cost and schedule control. Case studies involving program management problem solving and decision making in the acquisition environment are used.

Prerequisites: MN3331/or MN3302, MN3309, MN3371, MN4602 or equivalent, SE4011 and MN3384; or MN3361, MN3362, MN3363, MN3364, MN3365.

 MN4379 - Operations Management

This course introduces students to problems and analysis related to the design, planning, control, and improvement of manufacturing and service operations. It will extensively utilize case studies and analytical problem sets. Topics include operations strategy, process analysis, project analysis, materials management, production planning and scheduling, quality management, computer-aided manufacturing, capacity and facilities planning, and theory of constraints applied to product development. The course will equip students with the basic tools and techniques used in analyzing operations, as well as the strategic context for making operational decisions.

 MN4410 - Logistics Engineering

TBD

 MN4450 - Logistics Strategy

DAU Equiv: LOG 304. This is the logistics capstone course. The course explores and analyzes the concepts, processes and methods of strategic planning and execution, emphasizing aggressive proactive techniques to ensure maximum logistics influence on major weapon systems acquisition as well as optimum life cycle management of fielded systems. Cultural constraints of the current logistics environment and how to succeed in it is a significant focus of the course. The course examines and analyzes key opportunities for maximum logistics influence in requirements, development, contracting, test and evaluation, reliability, and maintainability as well as financial management and communications. The course features logistics management relevance to service roles and missions. It employs lectures, guided discussions, case studies, role-playing, panel discussions, and lessons learned in the DoD acquisition environment. For the final examination project, the class is divided into teams and produces a comprehensive strategic plan for logistics for a fictitious major program. This course is the Distributed Learning version of GB4450. Prerequisite: MN4410.

 MN4602 - Test and Evaluation Management

Designed to cover Developmental, Operational and Joint Test and Evaluation, including planning concepts and procedures frequently used in test and evaluation programs. Taught from the perspective of the Program Manager, Test Project Officer and Test Engineer. Actual military cases are used for examples. Topics include the role of Test and Evaluation in Systems Engineering and Acquisition Management, DT and OT test planning, introduction to test design, conduct of tests, live fire testing, modeling and simulation, human systems integration (HIS), reporting of test results, range and resource issues, and lessons learned. Student teams will write a detailed test plan. Prerequisite: MN3302.

 MO1180 - Topics in Mathematics for Systems Analysis

Logic, elementary mathematics, combinatorics, and matrix algebra, plus a review of selected topics from single variable calculus with extensions to two variables. This course is intended for first quarter students in the distributed learning Master of Systems Analysis curriculum.

Prerequisites: Single-variable calculus

 MV3101 - Introduction to Department of Defense Modeling and Simulation

This course serves as an important overview course for all students enrolled in the MOVES curricula, in addition to other curricula at NPS. It covers the origin, evolution, breadth and importance of DoD modeling and simulation (M&S), and the utilization of M&S in DoD system acquisition life cycle. The course focuses on the functional areas of DoD M&S, which are: Training, Analysis, Acquisition, Planning, Test, and Evaluation. This course also is offered as SE3101.

Prerequisite: None.

 MV3202 - Computer Graphics Programming

An introduction to the principles of the hardware and the software used in the production of computer generated images. The objective of the course is to instruct students in 3D graphics programming. Topics include graphics programming in a window environment, basic rendering and color, transformations, font rendering, selection, lighting and hidden surface elimination. The primary focus of the course is the design and implementation of a major project involving 3D graphics.

 MV3204 - Computer Graphics Modeling using X3D/VRML

This course provides an introduction to the principles of hardware and software used for computer-generated 3D graphics via the World Wide Web. The focus of the course is authoring interactive 3D scenes and a major design project. The course is intended for MOVES and Computer Science students working in visual simulation, or students in other majors interested in the basics of 3D modeling and rendering.

 MV3500 - Internetwork Programming for Virtual Environments

An introduction to network communications in simulation applications. Topics include an introduction to the TCP/IP protocol stack; TCP/IP socket communications, including TCP, UDP, and multicast; and protocol design issues, with emphasis on Distributed Interactive Simulation and High Level Architecture. The emphasis will be on Windows and Web-browser applications.

 MV4205 - Advanced 3D Modeling using X3D/VRML

This course teaches advanced principles and practice of web-based 3D computer graphics using X3D (formerly the Virtual Reality Modeling Language, VRML). Examples and class projects are typically oriented to problems of military or scientific interest. Topics include event scripting, optimized geometry representations, prototype extensibility, X3D Earth geospatial models, humanoid animation and IEEE Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) networking.

 MV4474 - Networked Virtual Environment Systems

This course covers the design and implementation of network and software architectures for real-time, interactive 3D virtual environments (VEs). Network architecture topics include a taxonomy for networked virtual environments, distributed interactive simulation protocols (DIS and HLA), virtual reality modeling language (VRML), agent-based network protocols (Java/Telescript), proposed solutions for large-scale networked virtual environments (area of interest managers and object brokers), multicast backbone tools and developments, and virtual reality transfer protocol proposals. Software architecture topics include representative software architectures for VEs (NPSNET, DIVE, MASSIVE, etc.), commercial toolkits for VE development (WorldToolKit, Division's dvs, Performer, etc.), lag in multiprocessor virtual environments, and the HCI implications on VE network and software architectures.

  OA3401 - Human Factors in Systems Design

This course will provide an introduction to the field of human factors with an emphasis on military systems. Humans are the most important element of any military system. Consequently, the design of effective systems must take into account human strengths and limitations as well as considerations of human variability. The course surveys human factors and human-centered design and system effectiveness and safety. Topics include human cognition and performance as they are influenced by physiological, anthropometric, and environmental considerations.

 OA3411 - Introduction to Human Systems Integration

You will learn about the policies that govern HSI, the domains that comprise HSI, and the capabilities and limitations of humans in complex systems under a variety of stressful conditions.

 OA3412 - Human Systems Integration in the Acquisition Lifecycle

You will learn how HSI practitioners work with developers, designers, program managers, logisticians, and engineers to influence the entire lifecycle of a system – from concept development through the operations and support phase.

 OA3413 - Human Systems Integration Tools, Tradeoffs, and Processes

An important task for HSI practitioners is to assist acquisition program leaders in making tradeoff decisions in a resource-constrained environment. This course provides you with the theories and tools to help you help them make informed decisions.

 OA3602 - Search and Detection Theory

This course surveys and applies various tools of operational and decision analysis to naval tactical problems. Tools include game theory, cost-effectiveness, utility theory, simulation, and probability. Problems include search and patrol, mine warfare, target coverage, and reliability.

Prerequisites: Probability and statistics (OS3180, OS3104, or equivalent)

 OA4401 - Individual Performance: Sensation, Perception, and Cognition

This course provides the methods, theories, and applications of psychophysics and the physiological bases for sensory processes. The theoretical and empirical foundations for perception will be addressed, along with perceptual learning and adaptation. Cognition, decision making, and motor output will also be covered. An overview will be given of the relationship between sensory/perceptual processes and display technology including augmented displays, human-in-the-loop simulators, virtual environments, and more traditional system displays. Military applications will be a consistent referent.

 OA4402 - Training & Simulation

This course will provide an overview of learning principles, training system development and evaluation, the Instructional System Development approach, Navy training practices, and simulation traaining systems. Tradeoffs among personnel selection, training, and other domains of HSI will be addressed.

 OA4406 - Survivability, Habitability, Environmental Safety, and Occupational Health

This course will provide an overview of personnel survivability methodology in safety, health hazards, and occupational health concepts. The evaluation of new and modified military systems and equipment for safety and potential health hazards will be addressed through reviewing models, methods, and processes available to help identify and mitigate the potential harm from accidents and hostile environments. Occupational health concerns will be addressed and methods of alleviating or minimizing workplace hazards will be analyzed. Risk analysis and mitigation models also will be examined for their contribution to increased safety and operational effectiveness.

 OA4408 - Team Performance and Decision Making

This course addresses current topics and advances in the understanding of team performance, decision-making, socio-technical issues, and team performance measurement. Key issues will be covered such as verbal and nonverbal communications, shared mental models, dynamic task allocation, team training, action coordination, teamwork breakdowns, and team organizational structure.

 OA4414 - Human Systems Integration Case Studies and Applications

You will apply what you have learned in the previous three courses to evaluate historical case studies and to engage in HSI activities in typical acquisition systems.

 OA4603 - Systems Test & Evaluation

TBD

 OA4702 - Cost Estimation

Advanced study in the methods and practice of systems analysis with emphasis on cost analysis; cost models and methods for total program structures and single projects; relationship of effectiveness models and measures to cost analysis; public capital budgeting of interrelated projects; detailed examples from current federal practices.

Prerequisite: OA3103 (OS3080 satisfies this prerequisite.)

 OC2902 - Fundamentals of Geospatial Information and Services

This course will give the student an appreciation for the important facts about precision location today, from the true physical shape of the earth to the fusion of geographically labeled data in modern electronic databases. Today's military officer needs to know the fundamentals of precision location systems to operate in the battlespace of the 21st century. We have come from precise position being 60 nautical miles in the 1700's to a few meters in the 2000's. We have gone from dead reckoning on paper charts to GPS positions fed to fully automated navigation and weapons systems. The entire process of producing modern geospatially tagged items will be reviewed. This will include the scientific background of the processes and the advantages and limitations of the steps.

 OC2930 - Introduction to Oceanography for Undersea Warfare

An introduction to ocean processes and phenomena with applications to Undersea Warfare.

 OS2080 - Probability and Statistics I (3-0) Fall/Spring

Fundamentals of probability and statistics useful in military modeling. Topics include probability laws and calculation methods, conditional probability, Bayes' Theorem, discrete and continuous random variables, the binomial, geometric, Poisson, exponential, and normal distributions, expectation, variance, and covariance, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and simple linear regression. Emphasis is on understanding uncertainty and developing computational skills for military systems analysis.

Prerequisite: Single variable calculus.

 OS2100 - Probability and Statistics

An introduction. Topics include probability laws and calculation methods, conditional probability, discrete and continuous random variables, common probability distributions, introduction to modeling, expectation, variance, covariance, and rudiments of discrete time processes. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression. Emphasis is on understanding uncertainty and developing computational skills.

Prerequisite: Single variable calculus

 OS3006 - Operations Research for Cost Analysts (3-0) Summer

This course is a survey of operations research techniques. Spreadsheet analysis using Excel is applied to problem solving using methods in decision theory, linear programming, network flow, simulation, queuing, forecasting, and project management techniques. Students will practice defining a problem, formulating a model, attaining a solution and evaluating the results using operations research techniques. Subject Matter Experts in cost estimation will provide an overview and background in cost estimation. Cost estimation examples are provided as part of homework exercises.

Prerequisite: Single-variable calculus (MA1117).

 OS3080 - Probability and Statistics II (3-0) Summer/Winter

Additional topics in probability and statistics for systems analysis, including conditional probability and conditional expectation, basic analytical process models, graphical data analysis, simple and multiple regression, and basic time-series analysis. This course is a follow-on to OS2080 for Master of Systems Analysis students.

Prerequisites: OS2080

 OS3081 - Systems Analysis Cases I

This is the first course in a three-course sequence in systems analysis practice. This course focuses on learning from real defense systems analysis case histories through readings, discussion, and writing point papers. Emphasis is on understanding the pitfalls of analysis, highlighting critical assumptions, and recognition of the strengths and weaknesses of applied analytical methodologies. Case histories include actual defense studies conducted with large-scale warfare simulations, seminar wargaming, and other methodologies common in DoD studies and analysis.

Prerequistes: Graduate standing in Systems Analysis, Operations Research, or Systems Engineering; completion of courses in probability, statistics, simulation, uncertainty modeling, cost-benefit and decision analysis, and optimization.

 OS3082 - Systems Analysis Cases II

This is the second course in a three-course sequence in systems analysis practice. This course focuses on learning from participating in class discussion of decision & analysis problem cases, and writing concise systems analysis proposals. Cases are drawn from scenarios in defense planning, programming, and budgeting for weapons systems and forces. Emphasis is on systems analysis problem formulation, identification of objectives, measures of effectiveness, articulation of critical assumptions, and outlining of appropriate analytical methodologies. Special emphasis is placed on Cases that are typical of quick-turn-around, limited-resources Pentagon Programming analysis and budget-drills.

Prerequistes: OS3081

 0S3111 - Probability and Statistics for HSI and MOVES

Noncalculus-based introduction in the context. Descriptive statistics and graphical techniques. Probability rules including Bayes Rule and independence. Discrete and continuous probability distributions, expected values, quantiles, variance, covariance, correlation, expected values, and variance of linear combinations of random variables, notably the sample mean. Fundamentals of statistics in one-sample setting including the ideas of estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Use and comparison of parametric and nonparametric approaches.

 OS3112 - Statistics and Design of Experiments

This course reviews the basic concepts of data collection, data description, and graphical displays. It covers fundamentals of experimental design and analysis of categorical data. Students will learn how to set and analyze experiments using basic experimental design starting with two-sample methods and advancing to designs such as factorials, fractional factorials, and randomized block designs. Designs appropriate for human research (such as repeated measure designs) and/or large-scale simulation experiments (such as Latin hypercube designs) are included. Parametric and nonparametric approaches are compared and contrasted. Methods for analyzing categorical data are introduced: one- and two-sample inference for proportions, and contingency tables. Datasets and motivational examples are drawn from recent research relevant to HSI and/or MOVES.

 OS3180 - Probability & Statistics for Systems Engineering

This course introduces the systems engineering and analysis student to probability, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and regression. The modeling and analysis of the stochastic behavior of systems provides the context for the course. Topical coverage includes the normal, binomial, Poisson, exponential, and lognormal distributions; probabilistic measures of system performance; graphical and numerical data summaries; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests based on one or two samples; regression with one or more predictors; and single factor analysis of variance. The lab portion of the class uses spreadsheets to support the modeling and analyses. The course is delivered in block format.

Prerequisite: SE1001 or equivalent

 OS3211 - Systems Optimization

This course is an application-oriented introduction to optimization. It introduces models (linear, integer and nonlinear programs), modeling tools (sensitivity and post-optimality analysis), and optimization software and solution techniques (including heuristics). It presents many military and private sector optimization applications in production planning and scheduling, inventory planning, personnel scheduling, project scheduling, distribution systems planning, facility sizing and capacity expansion, communication systems design, and product development.

Prerequistes: Admission to graduate standing, MN3108. (Concurrent OS4680 satisfies this prerequisite.)

 OS3301 - Simulation Modeling and Analysis

OS3301 is a simulation and analytical course that provides students with a foundation in simulation theory and process modeling, random number generation concepts, basic queuing theory in process modeling, applied data analysis, an introduction into experimental design, hypothesis testing, and hands-on system simulation. Students will use these concepts in class projects to simulate systems, evaluate system performance, and compare alternative systems.

Prerequisites: OS2080.

 OS3380 - Combat Systems Simulation

This course provides an introduction to discrete and continuous time modeling of systems, especially combat systems. Students learn the fundamentals of simulation modeling and analysis, and construct increasingly sophisticated models of combat behavior. Students are introduced to Lanchester equations and other abstract models, as well as JANUS and other high-resolution, commercial combat simulation programs. Students reinforce and extend statistical skills by learning the principles for design and analysis of simulation experiments for estimation and comparison. The primary course objective is for the student to understand the enduring fundamentals of how combat models are built and used to support decision making.

Prerequisites: SE1002 and OS3180.

 OS3401 - Human Factors in System Design

This course will provide the student with the ability to evaluate and predict human performance in specified operational environments. The effects of stress factors such as noise, temperature, motion, work load, etc., on various aspects of human performance will be studied. Students will identify the control and display requirements or an EW system and design a work space to accommodate an EW data reduction/analysis system.

Prerequisite: None.

 OS3680 - Naval Tactical Analysis

Introduction to operation analysis method, measures of effectiveness, decision analysis, game theory, detection models, search and patrol, barrier patrols, optimum allocation of search assets, and weapons effectiveness.

 OS3701 - Cost Estimation I: Methods and Techniques (3-0) Fall/Spring

This course provides a broad-based understanding of the cost analysis activities involved in the acquisition and support of DoD systems. It introduces operations research techniques fundamental to the field of cost estimation. The course covers the defense systems acquisition process, time value of money, cost processes, data collection and sources, and economic analysis; it develops, uses, and analyzes cost estimating techniques commonly encountered in both the DoD and industry, including statistical and nonstatistical cost estimating relationships, inflation indices, cost improvement curves, time phasing, wrap rates, and uncertainty analysis.

Prerequisites: OS3080 or equivalent.

 OS4010 - Engineering Risk-Benefit Analysis

The ERBA course addresses risk assessment, decision and cost-benefit analysis, and fault-tree methods for describing and making decisions about the societal risks associated with large engineering projects. Various methodologies will be introduced that are useful in describing and making decisions about risks, with particular emphasis on those associated with the design of products. Students will be exposed to issues related to balancing risks and benefits in situations involving human safety, product liability, environmental impact, and financial uncertainty. Presentations will be made of major risk assessment studies and public decision processes. Topics include probabilistic risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis, reliability and hazard analysis, decision analysis, and technical risk management.

 OS4011 - Risk Benefit Analysi

This course emphasizes decision analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and cost-benefit analysis in systems analysis and systems acquisition contexts. The course is designed to give students an understanding of how these diverse topics can be applied to a decision making process that must take into consideration significant technological and financial risk. The course will present and interpret a framework for balancing risks and benefits to applicable situations. Typically, these involve large financial and technological uncertainties. Concepts are applied to real world problems resulting in decision models that provide insight, understanding and improvement of acquisition decisions.

Prerequisite: Course in probability

 OS4012 - Cost Estimation IV: Risk and Uncertainty Analysis (3-0) Winter/Summer

Risk and Uncertainty Analysis provides the foundation for an understanding of risk management as it relates to cost estimation. It addresses program risks that help ensure program costs, schedule, and performance objectives are met. Students are given an overview of how to model the cost/risk associated with a defense acquisition program. Topics covered include basic probability concepts, correlation, Cost drivers, subjective probability assessment, goodness-of-fit testing, and simulation concepts using spreadsheet-based simulation packages. Monte Carlo simulation based cost risk case reinforce the techniques taught.

Prerequisites: OS3080 and OS3701.

 OS4013 - Cost Estimation VI: Decision Analysis for Cost Estimators (3-0) Winter

This course presents an introduction to the techniques of Decision analysis. Decision analysis techniques can be used to help decision makers solve complex decision problems involving sequential decisions, major uncertainties, imperfect information, varying degrees of risk, and often multiple competing or conflicting objectives. The course includes structuring decision with influence diagrams and decision trees, modeling uncertainty with subjective probabilities, sensitivity analysis, the value of information, and modeling risk attitudes using utility theory. A fundamental understanding of probability and calculus is expected.

Prerequisites: OS3080, OS3006, and OS4702.

 OS4080 - Cost Estimation V: Cost Estimating and Analysis Cases (3-0) Summer/Winter (starting Summer 2012)

This course focuses on learning from real cost estimation case histories through readings, discussion, and writing point papers. Emphasis is on understanding the capabilities and limitations of cost estimation and analysis, highlighting critical assumptions, and recognition of the strengths and weaknesses of applied analytical methods. Case histories include actual department of defense cost studies conducted that have been considered successes and those that have been considered failures. These cases provide the lessons learned for future cost estimation and analysis studies.

Prerequisite: OS4703.

 OS4081 - Cost Estimating and Analysis Capstone I (3-4) Fall/Spring (starting Fall 2013)

This course focuses on learning from participating in a cost estimation team project. Small-teams (4-6 students) will be given an actual cost estimating analysis project drawn from actual cost problems compiled by the major systems commands and Service Cost Agencies from the departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Emphasis is on cost problem formulation, identification of objectives, measures of effectiveness, articulation of critical assumptions, and outlining of appropriate analytical methods. Class time during the quarter is used for team progress briefings and critical class discussion.

Prerequisite: OS4080.

 OS4082 - Cost Estimating and Analysis Capstone II (3-4) Winter/Summer (starting Winter 2013)

This course continues the on hands-on experience of OS4081, completing the cost estimation project. Student teams will develop the cost model and analyze alternative cost estimations of the problems presented in the previous course; they will develop and test the estimate, and then document and defend their estimate. Students provide concise written reports, which include the analytical results, and a presentation to decision makers. Class time during the quarter is used for team progress briefings and critical class discussion.

Prerequisite: OS4081

 OS4083 - Systems Analysis Cases III

This is the third course in a three-course sequence in systems analysis practice. This course focuses on hands-on experience conducting rapid quantitative systems analysis. Emphasis is on small-team (2-3 student) Systems Analysis projects and presentations. Typical projects are based on analysis proposals developed in the preceding course. Class time during the quarter is used for team progress briefings and critical class discussion. The projects culminate with a concise written report, including analytical results, and a presentation to decision-makers.

Prerequisite: OS3082

 OS4580 - Logistics Systems Analysis

This course is about military logistics systems. It includes processes employed during system acquisition, chiefly reliability and maintainability analyses, which contribute, along with other aspects of a military logistics system, to determining the operational support costs and operational availability of military systems. In-service support includes the supply system for repair parts for organizational-level maintenance and the provision of military or contractor support of depot-level maintenance. Operational logistics includes logistics planning and predicting the sustainability of deployed forces.

Prerequisites: OS3180 and SE3100.

 OS4680 - Naval Systems Analysis

Analysis process, analysis of alternatives, analysis in the systems engineering management process, multi-objective decision-making, sensitivity analysis.

 OS4702 - Cost Estimation II: Advanced Concepts in Cost Estimating (3-0) Winter/Summer

This course is the second of three sequential cost estimation courses. It provides a broad-based understanding of the cost estimating principles applied to various fields of the acquisition and support of DoD systems. It introduces topics such as Cost Estimating Relationships, non-Ordinary Least Squares methods, Software Cost Estimating, Labor Pricing, Source Selection Process, Cost Management, EVMS, and higher level Regression Applications.

Prerequisite: OS3701 or OA4702.

 OS4703 - Cost Estimation III: Applied Cost Analysis (3-0) Spring/Fall

This course is the third of three sequential cost estimation courses. It provides a broad-based understanding of the cost estimating principles applied to various fields of the acquisition and support of DoD systems. It focuses on the analysis of cost methods and topics such as Specialized Cost Estimating, Portfolio Analysis, Cost Benefit Analysis, Industrial Base Analysis, Supply Chain Management, and Labor Rates.

Prerequisite: OS4702 or OA4702.

 PD0810 - Thesis Research (0-8)

Thesis research for PD21 students.

 PH0810 - Thesis Research

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course.

 PH2514 - Introduction to the Space Environment

Plasma concepts. Solar structure and magnetic field, particle and electromagnetic emissions from the sun, the geomagnetic field, and the magnetosphere, radiation belts, structure and properties of the earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere, implications of environmental factors for spacecraft design.

Prerequisites: A course in basic electricity and magnetism.

 PH3052 - Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems

This inter-disciplinary course explores the physical principles underlying the sensor systems needed for satellites and tactical aircraft as well as limitations imposed by the atmosphere and operating environment on these systems and their communication links. Topics include: satellite orbits, the satellite environment, ionospheric interactions and atmospheric propagation, phased array and pulsed compressed radars, imaging synthetic aperture and inverse synthetic aperture radars, noise resources, thermal radiation, principles of semiconductor devices, optical and infrared imaging detector systems and their resolution limitations and bandwidth requirements.

 PH3119 - Oscillation and Waves

An introductory course designed to present mechanics to students studying acoustics. Kinematics, dynamics, and work and energy consideration for the free, damped, and driven oscillators. The wave equation for transverse vibration of a string, ideal and realistic boundary conditions, and normal modes. Longitudinal and transverse waves in bars. Transverse waves on rectangular and circular membranes. Vibrations of plates. Laboratory periods include problem sessions and experiments on introduction to experimental techniques and handling of data; the simple harmonic oscillator analog; transverse waves on a string; and transverse, longitudinal, and torsional waves on a bar.

 PH3401 - Introduction to the Sonar Equations

A discussion of each term of the sonar equations, with application to the detection, localization, and classification of underwater vehicles. Topics include ray acoustics, simple transmission loss models, tonals, spectrum and band levels, directivity index, array gain, doppler shift, and detection threshold. This course is intended primarily for students in the Undersea Warfare curriculum and is given in a "structured" PSI mode.

Prerequistes: Precalculus mathematics.

 PH3451 - Fundamental Acoustics

Development of, and solutions to, the acoustic wave equation in fluids; propagation of plane, spherical and cylindrical waves in fluids; sound pressure level, intensity, and specific acoustic impedance; normal and oblique incidence reflection and transmission from plane boundaries; transmission through a layer; image theory and surface interference; sound absorption and dispersion for classical and relaxing fluids; acoustic behavior of sources and arrays, acoustical reciprocity, continuous line source, plane circular piston, radiation impedance, and the steered line array; transducer properties, sensitivities, and calibration. Laboratory experiments include longitudinal waves in an air-filled tube, surface interference, properties of underwater transducers, three-element array, speed of sound in water, and absorption in gases.

 PH3452 - Underwater Acoustics

This course is a continuation of PH3451. Lumped acoustic elements and the resonant bubble; introduction to simple transducers; normal modes in rectangular and cylindrical enclosures; steady-state response of acoustic waveguides of constant cross section, propagating evanescent modes, and group and phase speeds; transmission of sound in the ocean, the Eikonal Equation and necessary space conditions for ray theory, and refraction and ray diagrams; sound propagation in the mixed layer, the convergence zone, and the deep sound channel; passive sonar equation, ambient noise and doppler effect and bandwidth considerations; active sonar equations, target strength and reverberation. Laboratory experiments include Helmholtz resonators, normal modes in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical enclosures, water-filled waveguide, noise analysis, impedance of a loudspeaker.

 PH4409 Engineering Acoustics Capstone Project (2-4) Summer (Same as EO4409)

The capstone project provides DL students with an opportunity to apply the principles and techniques covered in the coursework to a current problem of interest. Students will formulate a novel research question, conduct a literature review, analyze the problem using theory, experiment, and/or simulations, draw conclusions, and effectively communicate the results. This course satisfies the capstone requirement for students pursuing the non-thesis degree option. Students pursuing the thesis degree option are encouraged to use their work in this course towards their thesis.
Prerequisite: PH4454, PH4455, and EC4450 or equivalents.

 PH4454 - Sonar Transducer Theory and Design

A treatment of the fundamental phenomena basic to the design of sonar transducers, specific examples of their application and design exercises. Topics include piezoelectric, magnetostrictive and hydro mechanical effects. Laboratory includes experiments on measurement techniques, properties of transducer materials, characteristics of typical navy transducers, and a design project. A field trip to visit one or more transducer manufacturers is normally scheduled during the course.

 PH4455 - Sound Propagation in the Ocean

An advanced treatment of the subject. Topics include: reflection of spherical waves from ocean boundaries; normal mode propagation of sound; inhomogeneous wave equation and the point source in cylindrical coordinates; shallow water channel with fluid and solid bottoms; the deep sound channel and the WKB approximation; range-dependent channels; adiabatic normal modes and the parabolic equation; multi-path propagation; application to matched field processing and source localization.

  SE0811 - Thesis in Systems Engineering

Thesis course for students pursuing a systems engineering degree. Students are awarded grade of 'T' upon successful completion of their theses.

 SE3011 - Engineering Economics and Cost Estimation (3-0)

An introduction to the cost aspects of systems engineering, exploring cost from a decision-making perspective. Examines how cost is used to select alternatives and how the cost of systems can be measured. Concepts covered include economic analysis, cost behavior, cost allocation, system cost, life cycle costs, cost over time, cost estimating techniques, cost uncertainty, and cost risk.

Prerequisites: OS3180 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

 SE3030 - Quantitative Methods in Systems Engineering

This course discusses advanced mathematical and computational techniques that find common application in systems engineering. It also provides an introduction to MATLAB, a computational tool useful in obtaining quantitative answers to engineering problems. Among the topics addressed in this course are vector analysis, complex analysis, integral transforms, special functions, numerical solution of differential equations, and numerical analysis.

 SE3031 - Tools for SE Research

Tools for SE Research.

 SE3100 - Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

Introduction to systems thinking and the processes of systems engineering. The course covers requirements generation, conceptual system design, preliminary systems architecture, comparison of alternatives, and basics of test and evaluation. Three different frameworks, including the DoD standard JCIDS, are presented.

 SE3121 - Introduction to C4ISR

This course studies command and control (C2) information processing and decision making in the context of adaptive combat organizations and the C4ISR System Infrastructure that support it. Topics include: C2 decision processes [Observe-Orient-Decide-Act Loops, Problem Sensemaking (Identification) – Solution Finding and Implementation Processing], operational architectures, intelligence preparation of the Battlespace (IPB); mission success and organizational fitness.

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor.

 SE3122 - Naval Weapon Systems Technology - I (3-0)

This is the first of two courses that introduce the student to the technologies of combat systems. It starts with a brief survey of military sensor technology. It then introduces the student to effects of the propagation medium on sensor performance, the relationship between signals and noise, and the concepts of signature and signature control. The various sensor technologies involved in military applications of all kinds are presented as well as the essentials of C4ISR and the C4ISr Framework.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

 SE3123 - Naval Weapon Systems Technology - II (3-0)

The second of a two course sequence, this course introduces the student to both the effects that weapons can produce as well as the technologies needed by weapons systems to create those effects, including the control elements. It is designed to provide an early initial familiarization of the student with critical weapons concepts. Analytic techniques are presented that allow the student to evaluate the interrelationships between the combat systems.

Prerequisites: SE3122, or consent of instructor.

 SE3250 - Capability Engineering

This course presents a systems engineering approach to determining military capabilities required to execute a mission set. It introduces simulation as a method for assessing performance of a capabilities portfolio. Topics covered include current DOD and Naval practices for capabilities engineering, design and assessment of capability portfolios, and use of commercial and custom simulations to analyze capability portfolio performance.

Prerequisites: OS3180 or equivalent, and SE3100. Corequisite: SE3011.

 SE3302 - Systems Suitability

This course presents the techniques of system design and assessment for operational feasibility, including reliability, maintainability, usability (including human factors and human performance), supportability, and producability. Design methods for open architecture of hardware and software are presented. Software integration and management from a systems perspective is presented.

 SE3303 - Systems Assessment

This course begins with a discussion of cost as an independent variable. Estimation and mitigation of cost risk, technical risk, performance risk, and schedule risk are studied in detail. Test and evaluation of systems is presented from both an engineering and DoD perspective.

 SE3351 - Human Factors for Engineering Design

This course is cross-listed with OS3401. OS3401 Course Description: This course will provide an introduction to the field of Human Factors with an emphasis on military systems. Humans are the most important element of any military system. Consequently, the design of effective systems must take into account human strengths and limitations as well as considerations of human variability. The course surveys human factors, human-centered design, and system effectiveness and safety. Topics include system design in light of human cognition and performance as they are influenced by physiological, anthropometric and environmental considerations.

Prerequisite: None.

 SE3411 - SoS Program Definition and Concept Development (3-2)

Managing the integration of Large System of Systems (SoS) through a Lead Systems Integrator brings together all developers through a single, central point of communication and control to direct work activities, plan for SoS integration, organize for effective scheduling, and build the team’s commitment to successful integration and interoperability. SoS integration often poses confounding problems due to the myriad of interactions between systems and the overall meta-system. This course discusses the special problems of managing the integration of system of systems. Topics include the characteristics of the large scale SoS, program management of SoS integration, uses of SoS design and architecture for decision analysis, feasibility analysis and approaches for SoS integration, SoS contract management, and execution for SoS acquisitions.

 SE3412 - SoS Design and Development (3-2)

Difficulties arise for the Lead Systems Integrator (LSI) in managing the integration of system of systems (SoS) when a number of independently developed (or to be developed) systems (1) do not have a sound meta-systems design or effective meta-systems architecture, (2) present decision makers with confounding requirements that imply significant differences in boundaries and boundary conditions, (3) neither track nor elaborate on the implications of changes in requirements, and (4) lack a meta-schema and proper semantic structures to fulfill the needs for interoperability. This course discusses the special problems of managing and engineering system of systems from the LSI perspective. Topics include characteristics of SoS in the LSI management environment, engineering implications of SoS issues, management and engineering methodology of SoS, SoS architecture, analysis of SoS, and tools for engineering and monitoring SoS. Managing the integration of SoS through an LSI requires attention to the meta-systems implications of changes at the systems level. This course discusses the special problems of managing the integration of system of systems from the LSI perspective. Topics from the LSI perspective include the characteristics of the large scale SoS, program management of SoS integration, uses of SoS design and architecture for decision analysis, feasibility analysis and approaches for SoS integration, SoS contract management, and execution for SoS acquisitions.

 SE3413 - SoS Integration, Qualification and Lifecycle (3-2)

Challenges occur for the Lead Systems Integrator (LSI) in integrating and qualifying, through verification and validation, the multiple constituent elements of a System of Systems (SoS) in a complex resource and contracting environment.  The LSI must focus on integration strategy development and execution, technical risk management and performance analyses that are unique to SoS integration and deployment.  LSI management must also address programmatic risk management; identify leading indicators of negative emergent program behaviors and coordination of multi-program integration.  This course discusses these special problems of managing and engineering system of systems from the LSI perspective.  Topics include complexity theory in program management (PM), integrated risk management, SoS program assessment strategy, SoS governance, SoS integration design & considerations, SoS performance analysis, SoS leading indicators and reference model strategy.

 SE3810 - Systems Engineering Seminar (0-2)

This weekly seminar on topics in Systems Engineering is intended to broaden and extend knowledge horizons beyond material covered in regular classes, to provide opportunities for critical discussion of systems engineering topics, to relate course work to the real world and emphasize the implications of engineering choices on a society as a whole, and to promote good lifelong learning habits. The course will provide operational, historical, cultural, and economic contexts for the material studied in the SE curriculum. It will also promote the recognition of, critical analysis of, and planning for development and exploitation of future military capabilities. Students will be required to read, analyze, and discuss in class at least four books per quarter selected by the faculty to address an overall theme that will vary from quarter to quarter. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

 SE3900 - Topics in Systems Engineering and Analysis

This course presents topics in systems engineering and analysis that are relevant to the across-campus project or that meet special interests of the students.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

 SE3910 - System Evolution and Technology Assessment

System Evolution and Technology Assessment.

 SE4003 - Systems Software Engineering

The course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of software engineering and methods for requirements definition, design and testing of software. Specific topics include introduction to the software life cycle, basic concepts and principles of software engineering, object-oriented methods for requirements analysis, software design and development. Special emphasis is placed on the integration of software with other components of a larger system.

 SE4007 - Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

This course provides an overview of the art and science of systems engineering and an introduction to the systems approach and methodological framework for designing, implementing, managing, and reengineering large-scale systems and processes. Topics covered include the systems approach, understanding and defining customer (stakeholder) problems, eliciting and defining stakeholder requirements, defining stakeholder-driven value systems, developing alternative system concepts, and modeling and analysis of alternatives. Students will carry out projects and assignments both individually and as teams.

 SE4008 - Systems Engineering and Integration

Customer requirements modeling and subsequent system functional and architecture modeling, form the basis for engineering and integrating complex technical systems and processes. This course provides the student with the language, terminology, and concepts of system architecting and an introduction to various types of architectures and their interrelationships. Topics covered include organizational systems, architecture modeling (e.g., the Hatley/Hruschka/Pribhai Method, the Rummler-Brache Method), types and relationships of architectures and architectural frameworks (including the C4ISR Framework and the Zachman Framework), human and cultural aspects of architecting, process engineering, information engineering and architectures, and knowledge formation and distribution. Students will carry out projects and assignments both individually and as teams.

Prerequisites: SE4007.

 SE4009 - Systems Architecture for Systems Engineering

This course provides the student with an understanding of the context and framework for carrying out a systems engineering project and the system-level responsibilities of a systems engineer. Topics covered include systems architecture, systems design and development, system test and evaluation, system reliability, system maintainability, human factors and system design, system producibility and supportability, balancing live cycle cost, schedule, suitability, and performance, and systems engineering project management and control. Types of systems considered will range from small-scale to large-scale and from primarily technical to primarily social-political. Students will work in teams to complete a system engineering project to analyze, design and architect a working prototype system.

Prerequisites: SE4008 , or equivalent.

 SE4011 - Systems Engineering for Acquisition Managers (3-2) As Required

Systems engineers flow requirements down to detailed elements, integrate elements, and verify system performance. This course concentrates on the structural and technical elements of system engineering necessary in the product development domain. Multidisciplinary activities leading to requirements analysis, design trades, and integrated product-process development are complemented by current best manufacturing practices and design for cost principles. Structured methods, decision analysis, and quality engineering foundations are emphasized. Case studies from a variety of industrial contexts are presented and discussed. This course is team taught by experts from several disciplines.

Prerequisites: None.

 SE4012 - Management of Advanced Systems Engineering (4-0) As Required

This course provides the student with an understanding of architecting, Object Oriented Systems Engineering, the Unified Modeling Language, and the control of complex projects with many Systems Engineers through the use of metrics. Specific emphasis is placed on exploring the relationship between science, art, deductive processes, inductive processes, systems engineering, and acquisition management. In order to solve today's complex problems, the student will become familiar with heuristic tools. This course is equivalent to DAU SYS 301.

Prerequisites: None.

 SE4022 - Systems Architecture (4-0)

TBD

 SE4115 - Combat Systems Integration

This course presents systems engineering techniques for integrating combat systems into a common system, including technology development, system development and integration, network integration, and system of systems integration. Lectures and projects exploring engineering design tools and analysis methods to meet specified systems requirements are used. Topics include engineering analysis of interfaces for power, data, mechanical, and other attributes; engineering change management; advanced collaboration environments; technology readiness levels; and integration risk mitigation.

Prerequisites: SE3113 or equivalent.

 SE4150 - Systems Architecting and Design

The use of models, from stakeholder needs to requirements, to system functional and physical architecture, through performance specification, for the basis for architecting and designing complex technical systems. This course provides the student with the language, terminology, concepts, methods, and tools of system architecting and design, including exploring the relationship between science, art, and deductive and inductive processes. Topics covered include architecture modeling (e.g. Hatley/Hruschka/Pirbhai and Rummler-Brache Methods), architectural frameworks (including Zachman and DoDAF), object oriented modeling approaches using Unified Modeling Language (UML) and Systems Modeling Language (SysML), human and cultural aspects of architecturing and design, requirements generation and definition, and knowledge formation and distribution. Students carry out projects and assignments both individually and as teams.

Prerequisites: SE3100 and SE3250.

 SE4151 - System Integration and Development

This course provides the student with an understanding of the context and framework for planning and carrying out integration and development, including emergent behavior, manufacturing, and production of complex systems. Topics covered include systems and SoS integration and production with consideration of multiple suitability aspects, including availability, reliability, maintainability, embedded software, human factors, producibility, interoperability, supportability, emergent behavior, life cycle cost, schedule, and performance. Types of systems considered are large-scale spanning applications from purely technical to socio-technical. Students work in teams to complete a systems engineering project to analyze, integrate, and produce a working prototype system. Prerequisite: SE4150.

 SE4353 - Risk Analysis and Management for Engineering Systems

This course covers three areas in the risk field - Qualitative Risk Analysis, Quantitative Risk Analysis, and Decision Risk Analysis. Qualitative Risk Analysis presents techniques for risk identification/evaluation, risk handling, risk monitoring and risk management. Quantitative Risk Analysis includes Probabilistic Risk Assessment (RPRA) of system performance and project cost/schedule. Decision Risk Analysis gives the students an understanding of how to apply risk and cost benefit techniques in decision making when one must deal with significant risk or uncertainty. The course will present a framework for balancing risks and benefits to applicable situations. Typically these involve human safety, potential environmental effects, and large financial and technological uncertainties. Concepts are applied toward representative problems resulting in risk and decision models that provide insight and understanding, and consequently lead to more successful projects/programs with better system performance within cost and schedule. This is the same course as ME4753.

Prerequisites: OS3180/OS3104, or equivalent graduate level course in probability, or consent of the instructor.

 SE4414 - SoS Leadership in Systems Integration (3-2)

Most major DoD acquisition activities are not the development of new systems but the improvement and integration of existing legacy systems. Furthermore, this acquisition activity is made exceptionally complex because the systems need to be integrated with a "Systems-of-Systems" (SoS) approach. SoS acquisition, development, and integration require skills in system integration that exceed those required with standalone system acquisition. These skills are embodied in the role of the "Lead System Integrator" (LSI), previously a contractor, but increasingly a DoD employee. In this course we examine the roles of the LSI, where DoD acquisition skills may need to be strengthened to perform as the LSI, and discuss methods and tools to do so. This course is a capstone to SE3411, SE3412, and SE3413.

 SE4354 - Systems Test and Evaluation

This course is designed to cover principles of test and evaluation (T&E) and the roles, purposes, functions, and techniques of T&E within the systems engineering process. The course will cover all aspects of T&E throughout the life cycle of a system to include test planning, test resources, development of test requirements, selection of critical test parameters, development of measures of effectiveness and performance, test conduct, analysis of test results, and determination of corrective action in the event of discrepancies. The course will emphasize the application of T&E through all phases of system development to include modeling and simulation (M&S) activities for enhancing the T&E process, developmental test and evaluation (DT&E), live fire test and evaluation (LFT&E), and operational test and evaluation (OT&E). Principles of experiment design and statistical analysis of test results will be reviewed. The course content will be consistent with Congressional and DoD requirements and guidelines and will include case studies and lessons learned from actual defense system tests. This course also offered as OS4603.

Prerequisites: OS3180 or equivalent and SE3100.

 SE4900 - Advanced Studies in Systems Engineering

Directed study at an advanced graduate level based on textbooks, journal literature, experimental projects, or other sources. This course is designed to permit study of a selected topic at an advanced level, and which is not available for study through regularly scheduled courses.

Prerequisites: Consent of program officer, academic associate, and instructor.

 SE4930 - Model-based Systems Engineering

Model-based Systems Engineering

 SI0810 - Integrating Project

This course serves as a final synthesis of the entire SEI curriculum. It brings together as many of the elements of the curriculum as possible in a comprehensive overview of the components and underlying technologies of modern warfare. The course requires completion of the curriculum's integrating project where student teams provide solutions using project management techniques.

Prerequisites: SE3001, SE3101 and/or consent of the instructor.

 SI3400 - Fundamentals of Engineering Project Management

This course examines modern techniques of engineering project management. Specific topics include review of the systems engineering management process, risk analysis and management, scheduling methodologies, the DoD acquisition environment, management of design activities, and project control mechanisms.

 SI4021 - Systems Engineering

Systems engineers flow requirements down to detailed elements, integrate elements, and verify system performance. This course concentrates on the structural and technical elements of system engineering necessary in the product development domain. Multidisciplinary activities leading to requirements analysis, design trades, and integrated product-process development are complemented by current best manufacturing practices and design for cost principles. Structured methods, decision analysis, and quality engineering foundations are emphasized. Case studies from a variety of industrial contexts are presented and discussed. This course is team taught by experts from several disciplines.

 SI4022 - Systems Architecture for Product Development

Systems architects respond to user needs, define and allocate functionality, decompose the system, and define interfaces. This course presents a synthetic view of system architecture: the allocation of functionality and its projection on organizational functionality; the analysis of complexity and methods of decomposition and re-integration; consideration of downstream processes including manufacturing and operations. Physical systems and software systems are discussed. Heuristic and formal methods will be presented. Students are given research assignments that provide opportunities to further learn how systems architecture principles are applied in a variety of application areas. This course provides an integrative forum for PD21 students to stimulate holistic, global, and innovative thinking, and to enable critical evaluation of current modes of architecture.

Prerequisites: None.

 SS0810 - Space Systems Thesis Research

Every student conducting thesis research enrolls in this course.

 SS3011 - Space Technology and Applications

An introduction to space mission analysis with an emphasis on those space missions supporting military operations. Topics include space history, doctrine and organizations, orbital mechanics, communication line analysis, space environment, spacecraft technology, and military, civil and commercial space systems.

 SS3041 - Space Systems and Operations I

Space systems mission analysis and design. Mission characterization, mission evaluation, requirements determination, cost analysis and estimating, cost and operational effectiveness analysis.

 SS3500 - Orbital Mechanics and Launch Systems

Fundamentals: conic sections, coordinate systems and transformations, time. The two-body problem: Newton's laws and their solution, Kepler's equation. Orbital maneuvering. Orbit determination. Perturbations. Mission design. An overview of the performance and selection of launch vehicles. Launch profile and basic terminology (GLOW, mass ratio, injected weight, etc.). Ascent and payload delivery performance. Launch windows, Future launch systems.

Prerequisites: MA1113/1114 and SS3011

 SS3613 - Military Satellite Communications

MILSATCOM mission analysis, systems design, and applications. This course will cover requirements, tactical employment, system architectures, satellite design and performance, terminal design and performance, associated information systems, link budget calculations, telemetry and control and IO/IW implications. The student will be expected to create SATCOM solutions for Navy and Marine scenarios.

 SS4051 - Military Space Systems and Architectures

This course covers the system level architectural design of selected Space Systems. Emphasis is on a balanced design of all seven components of space systems: space segment, launch segment, ground segment, mission operations, C3 architecture, subject, and orbit and constellation.

Prerequisites: SS3051 and SS3001

 SW3460 - Software Methodology

The course is designed to teach students the basic concepts of software engineering and methods for requirements definition, design and testing of software. Specific topics include introduction to the software life cycle, basic concepts and principles of software engineering, object-oriented methods for requirements analysis, software design and development

Prerequisites: Ability to program in a high level language.

 SW4150 - Programming Tools and Environments

This course covers the design and implementation of tools to aid software development, including syntax-directed editors, version-control systems, language-oriented debuggers, symbolic execution vehicles, programming databases, type checkers, and automatic programming tools. These topics are discussed in the context of an integrated, language-oriented, programming environment.

 SW4500 - Software Engineering

This course covers the techniques for the specification, design, testing, maintenance and management of large software systems. Specific topics include software life cycle planning, cost estimation, requirements definition and specification, design, quality assurance, and evolution. The laboratory sessions will discuss special topics.

Prerequisites: SW3460 or consent of instructor.

 SW4540 - Software Testing

This course covers the theory and practice of testing computer software with the intent of preventing, finding and eliminating bugs in software. Planning and executing software tests are covered, including requirements-based testing, functional testing, static analysis, code reading, symbolic testing, structural testing, and advanced testing techniques. These topics are discussed in the context of a realistic development environment, illustrated using a variety of software testing tools.

Prerequisites: SW3460 (can be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

 SW4555 - Engineering Network-Centric Systems

This course covers the concepts, methods, techniques and tools for engineering the development of network centric systems. Specific topics include the evolution of client/server models to distributed objects, an introduction to and comparison of CORBA/OpenDoc and OLE/COM, intelligent software agents, application development in distributed environments, security issues in network centric computing, and DoD software system development.

Prerequisites: SW3460 or consent of instructor.

 SW4582 - Weapons Systems Software Safety

This course provides the foundation for Software Systems Safety. The courses will focus heavily on the Software Engineering aspects of the discipline, the content injects enough Systems Safety Engineering principles to ensure that the graduates fully understand their responsibility in the overall system development process.

Prerequisites: SW3460 (can be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

 SW4920 - Advanced Topics in Software Engineering

Designed to support advanced group study of a subject matter of special interest in software engineering, dependent on faculty availability. Topics will be drawn from areas not covered by other advanced courses, or be focused treatments of subjects of limited scope. This course may be lecture- or lab-oriented, with prerequisites determined by the instructor. Students may repeat this course for credit with a different topic.

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