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Home >>  Information Operations Center >>  Publications of John Arquilla

Interviews with John Arquilla

The Drone War Goes Global
On Point with Tim Ashbrook--NPR
July 11, 2011

U.S. airborne drones now striking in half-a-dozen countries. The world and future of drone warfare.

Lessons From the American Revolution for Today's War-Fighters
PRI's The World
July 4, 2011

John Arquilla discusses his new book “Insurgents, Raiders, and Bandits: How Masters of Irregular Warfare Have Shaped Our World”.

Death Of Bin Laden May Change Al-Qaida's Tactics
National Public Radio Interview
May 12, 2011

Osama bin Laden's death has led many experts to speculate al-Qaida's capacity to orchestrate terrorist attacks may be permanently weakened. John Arquilla, who teaches in the special operations program at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, thinks it would be unwise to write off the al-Qaida threat.

Interview with Dr. John Arquilla
Small Wars Journal
Nov. 30, 2010

How can French Encounters with Irregular Warfare in the 19th Century Inform COIN in our time?

New Rules of War with Hanson & Arquilla: Chapter 5 of 5
John Arquilla and Victor Davis Hanson suggest specific ways in which the U.S. military can better meet contemporary global challenges.

Defense: Next examines John Arquilla's ideas on Cyber Privateers
Oct. 21, 2009
Arquilla lays out a few recommendations for how defense officials should wage “Netwar” in the virtual domain.

Prof. John Arquilla testified before the House Armed Services Committee Thursday, September 18, 2008.
The Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities Subcommittee met to hear testimony on Lessons for Countering al Qa’ida and the Way Ahead. (pdf)

John Arquilla interview re: the future of military technology and hardware (2006)

“Our military today oversees spending of about a billion and a quarter dollars every day. Most of that is misspent. Over this past quarter-century, we've reinforced an old industrial-policy military with hardware that makes increasingly less sense, spending most on things that provide the least return. The principal argument for that is: ‘We have  is misspent. Over this past quarter-century, we've reinforced an old industrial-policy military with hardware that makes increasingly less sense, spending most on things that provide the least return. The principal argument for that is: ‘We have to keep the big, old-style military because we might fight a big, old-style war one day.’ But in the future the bigger you are, the harder you're going to fall to ever-more accurate weapons.”

Interview with John Arquilla and David Ronfeldt
Défense & Sécurité Internationale, issue #13, March 2006